Male Physical Decline: Masculinity Is Threatened | National Review (… with some thoughts on what to do about it)

Studies suggest that young American males are physically weaker than previous cohorts.

Source: Male Physical Decline: Masculinity Is Threatened | National Review

I see this just in shaking hands with my male driver education students: many of them – too many of them – have the limp, “cold fish” handshake we used to associate with “girly men,” even when they are not obviously effeminate. Not all, thankfully! But many, especially among (I am sorry to say) my fellow Caucasians. And as this article points out, grip strength is just one marker of physical (and perhaps cultural) decline, but it’s a significant one. It is certainly a traditional marker of masculinity.

Is it any wonder that more Caucasian women are starting to heed the blandishments of a socially-engineering media (and their fellow-travelers in the academic and political worlds), and beginning to choose potential mates from other cultures, that are doing a better job of hanging onto the markers of masculinity than we often are?

It doesn’t have to be this way. It is a choice we make, and we can make other choices. For example: David French’s childhood was a mirror of my own… although I never liked Shannara, it was too obviously a rip-off of Tolkien. 😉 And while I did not change the family cars’ oil-filters on weekends, I did mow the lawn, rake the leaves, help with the gardening and pruning, shovel snow off the driveway, clean the gutters, clean the bathrooms, and do much else that contributed directly to the smooth running of the household.

I may not always have liked it, but I did it! And in the process, I learned both practical skills and the art of self-discipline – that sometimes it’s necessary to do things we may not enjoy, if it contributes to the common or long-term good – as well as exercised my body in the process.

I also, when not building plastic models, reading WW II books (or the Tolkien and McCaffrey French mentions), or playing D&D, was outside – hiking (even if I didn’t call it that, then), sledding, building forts, clearing trails, playing war, building and launching model rockets, exploring streams and marshes, playing pick-up games of tackle football, and yes, shooting: originally slingshots, then “graduating” to Daisy BB guns, Crossman air-rifles, and eventually .22s.

I was a Boy Scout, later in a “High Adventure” Explorer Post, where I did still more hiking, backpacking, canoeing, and much else. From my reading, I developed an interest in survival, and traditional skills, that continues today. I learned to make cordage, form pots from river clay, start fires with flint and steel (and later bow-drill), build a debris shelter, use a Dutch oven, and eventually (as an adult) to tan a deer-hide and shape a working bow out of a hickory stave. I learned how to cook over an open campfire – and how to clean up, afterwards.

In short, I learned to be a boy, which is the crucial first step in learning to be a man. Continue reading “Male Physical Decline: Masculinity Is Threatened | National Review (… with some thoughts on what to do about it)”