The Challenge of Dawa: Political Islam as Ideology and Movement and How to Counter It | Hoover Institution

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The purpose of this report is to suggest the basis for a new anti-dawa strategy, designed to check the advance of political Islam as an ideology and a movement.

In the first part, I describe the constitution of political Islam: the foundational principles, terminology, and objectives of Islamist ideology. In the second part, I analyze the infrastructure of political Islam, in particular the institutions and techniques of dawa. In the third part, I propose a number of policies that I believe will, if properly implemented, halt the spread of political Islam in the United States and perhaps also abroad. [The quotes here cited are from the executive summary of the longer report.]

Source: The Challenge of Dawa: Political Islam as Ideology and Movement and How to Counter It | Hoover Institution

It should be (but is not always) self-evident that Islam exists in an adversarial relationship to Christianity and to the West – both Western Christendom, as it historically has existed, and also the more secular West of Enlightenment philosophy and socio-political thought. Make no mistake, the end-game of Islam is world dominance: the conversion of the entire world to the Dar al-Islam – “the Realm of Submission to Allah.”

Although militant extremists seek to advance this ideology through violence, the perhaps greater danger is posed by those who are not overtly violent, but who seek to advance their ideology through dawa. Linked is an excellent discussion of this concept and its implication:

Dawa as practiced by radical Islamists employs a wide range of mechanisms to advance their goal of imposing Islamic law (sharia) on society. This includes proselytizing but extends beyond that. In Western countries, dawa aims both to convert non-Muslims to political Islam and to instill Islamist views in existing Muslims. The ultimate goal of dawa is to destroy the political institutions of a free society and replace them with the rule of sharia law.

Dawa is to the Islamists of today what the ‘long march through the institutions’ was to twentieth-century Marxists. It is subversion from within—the abuse of religious freedom in order to undermine that very freedom… dawa is rooted in the Islamic practice of attempting to convert non-Muslims to accept the message of Islam. As it is an ostensibly religious missionary activity, proponents of dawa enjoy a much greater protection by the law in free societies than Marxists or fascists did in the past.

“Worse, Islamist groups have enjoyed not just protection but at times official sponsorship from government agencies duped into regarding them as representatives of ‘moderate Muslims’ simply because they do not engage in violence.”

This is, it should be apparent, a dangerous misconception! Read on for more details.

Note: Ayaan Hirsi Ali is an internationally-recognized, Somali-born scholar of, and convert / refugee from, Islam – unfortunately, she converted to atheism, not Christianity, but her critique of Islam is no less on-point for that – and an international activist for women’s rights. For more information on her and her work, visit the AHA Foundation.

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Author: The Anglophilic Anglican

I am an ordained Anglican clergyman, published writer, former op-ed columnist, and experienced outdoor and informal educator. I am also a traditionalist: religiously, philosophically, politically, and socially. I seek to do my bit to promote and restore the Good, the True, and the Beautiful, in a world which has too-often lost touch with all three, and to help re-weave the connections between God, Nature, and humankind which our techno-industrial civilization has strained and broken.

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