Mother and Daughter Country Sweethearts Aprons

Source: Mother and Daughter Country Sweethearts Aprons

It saddens me that so few women wear aprons these days. It may seem a small thing, in a world in which so many terrible things are happening (this very day, a radical Islamic terrorist from Uzbekistan ran down and killed at least eight people in Manhattan with a truck, while shouting “Allahu akbar!”), but it is both a symbol and a thing itself.

Aprons are attractive and feminine, as well as being useful for keeping a woman’s clothes clean (and if they have pockets, carrying needful items for sewing, cooking, or wiping the tears of a sobbing child). But they are also a uniform, of a sort: the uniform of a woman who takes caring for her home and family seriously – a priority, not just one among many possible tasks, that she may, or may not, do if she has time.

And if she has a daughter, and they are wearing a matching mother-daughter set like this one, she is both setting an example and encouraging solidarity and emulation on the part of the rising generation. That is something which has always been important, but now that it is no longer taken for granted, no longer a given, is perhaps more vital than ever!

A woman who puts on an apron is girding herself for battle with entropy, chaos, and dissolution. She is taking a stand against disorder on the domestic front, and in so doing, she is also taking a stand against disorder in the wider world. That may sound excessively cosmic, but I think there is real truth to it. So I am happy to see these! Hope they encourage more women to “put on the uniform,” and take up the fight.

 


 

(The others on the page are lovely, too. The only thing I wish is that the pictures showed an actual mother with her daughter! Although I suspect she’s probably the one taking said pictures…)

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Halloween: An Orthodox Christian Perspective

Source: Halloween: An Orthodox Christian Perspective | DAIMONOLOGIA

Good morning, all, and wishing everyone who celebrates a joyful Eve of All Saints (All Hallows Eve), Hallowe’en, or Samhain! Yes, I said Samhain. Let us be clear, shall we, that while there are indeed some Pagan – or at least folkloric – roots to Halloween, it is not Satanic in origin. Although the Evil One and his minions can infect, warp, and twist this as they can many other things, let’s not hand him a victory by conceding the field uncontested, shall we? And Pagan does NOT equal Satanic, unless you want to claim that all of our pre-Christian ancestors were so: a notion I vigorously deny, decry, and protest!

Leaving nutcases like Anton LeVey and his followers out of it, there are two basic roots of Halloween, as we have it today: the pre-Christian Celtic, and the Christian. The latter is clear and historical; the former is more suggestive, based on linguistics, mythology, and folklore.

With respect to the Celtic root, Samhain is the Irish Gaelic name for this holiday, apparently derived from “samh” = summer and “fuin” = end. In Gaul (ancient Celtic France, before the invasion of the Germanic Franks, and the conversion to Christianity), it was Samonios, or Trinuxtion Samonii, “the Three Nights of Summer’s End.” This comes from the Coligny Calendar, IIRC, and because the Celts tended to start things on their eves (days were reckoned as beginning at sunset of the day before), it is generally believed that Samhain (Samonios) was the “Celtic New Year.”

The word “Samhain” is used today in modern Irish to refer to the month of November: it is NOT the name of the “Celtic God of the Dead,” that is Annwn (and he was not evil either). As a holiday (holy day), it marked the boundary between the season of warmth and light, and that of cold and dark, and corresponded to Beltane (May Day), its opposite on what some have called “the Wheel of the Year.” It was a liminal time, being neither (quite) Summer, nor (yet) Winter.

The ancient Celts were fond of these “boundary” times and places, which are neither one thing nor the other – dawn and dusk, for instance, which are neither day nor night, or the sea-shore, which is neither land nor ocean – and appear to have considered them to be “thin spots,” where the “veil between the worlds” (our ordinary physical-sensory world, and the “Otherworld” of spirit and the sacred) was permeable. Thus, at both Samhain and Beltane, spirits – both the spirits of the dead, and spiritual beings such as fairies – were thought to be able to cross between the Otherworld and this one.

Some were benevolent, some baneful, and some neutral: that Samhain had a darker cast to it than Beltane is understandable given that, Beltane is the beginning of the season of warmth, light, and growth (“Summertime, when the livin’ is easy,” to borrow a line from the American musical “Porgy and Bess”), whereas Samhain is the beginning of the season of cold, dark, and decay, a time of danger and potential death in an agricultural society. But again, while such considerations are unpleasant and frightening to humans, they are not evil, unless one considers the natural cycle of birth, life, death, decay, and rebirth (new life springing forth from, and nourished by, the detritus of the preceding year) to be evil.

Still, no one likes to die, or have one’s loved ones die, and in pre-modern cultures, Winter was a time when death – by disease, starvation, exposure to the elements, etc. – was an all-too-likely outcome. So many of the customs and traditions which developed around Samhain were, in origin, human efforts to come to terms with this aspect of existence. Many of our Halloween traditions today remain, from a psychological perspective, ways to deal with – even to defy and laugh in the face of – those things which most frighten us.

And then of course there is the second stream, the second major taproot, of Halloween, and the one which gives it its name: the Christian Feast of All Saints, or in England, All Hallows. This is described in more detail in the attached essay (which tends to deny or minimalize the Celtic root), so I will not go into as much detail, but basically: this is the feast (actually a triduum of feasts) celebrating all the saints (the “holy ones” of God), known and unknown, and including both those notable figures of extraordinary sanctity which we typically think of as “saints,” and also those whose holiness is known but to God – ordinary Christians, living out our lives to the best of our ability, as God gives us grace.

This began in Rome in the 8th century of the Christian era, and whether by chance or design, mirrored the three days of Samonios: the Eve of All Saints (All Hallows Eve) on October 31st, the Feast of All Saints (All Hallows) on November 1st, and the Feast of All Souls, on November 2nd, for the rest of us. 🙂 What is lacking is a clear-cut connection that would indicate a specific intention to “Christianize” Samhain; but in the all-encompassing design of Divine Providence, I do not think the parallelism is coincidental!

So these are the two “roots” of Halloween: the pre-Christian Celtic, and the Christian. What is notably lacking in this history is any reference to evil. That was, as the linked essay makes clear, largely a modern invention. True, the holiday has always had a close connection with death; but with the death which leads to rebirth: either in the naturally-inspired, “wheel-of-the-year” sense of the ancient Celtic feast, or in the rebirth to life eternal of the Christian faith (the dates of the deaths of saints are often referred to as their “heavenly birthdays”).

Of course, one may do as one wishes with this day – celebrate or avoid. But let us at least be fair and accurate to the history, and to the spiritual significance of this date. After all, for those of us who are Christians, our God is among other things the God of Truth. We do Him no honour by making up fables, or by lending the Evil One more influence than he actually possesses!

How Catholics Can Get Protestants Back To Their Reformation Roots

Protestant churches will claim a Reformation view of justification, but what it means has no bearing on their worship practices. Not so with Catholics.

Source: How Catholics Can Get Protestants Back To Their Reformation Roots

An interesting article! Definitely some things worth pondering in here. As classical Anglicans, of course, St. Bede’s, and the jurisdiction of which we are part (the United Episcopal Church of the United States) have not slipped so far over the edge as have some of the more extreme Protestant types! We have retained much that the “non-denominational” churches, and even some of the “mainline” Protestant ones, have abandoned. But a good reminder and reinforcement, nonetheless.

Twilight of Europe: Hundreds of European Languages Facing Extinction

European governments are calling for “diversity” at the expense of native European diversity. And this is literally a cultural genocide.

Source: Twilight of Europe: Hundreds of European Languages Facing Extinction

Another interesting essay from Carolyn Emerick.

I remember back in the late 1980s and early 1990s, when I was in college and, later, grad (divinity) school, how incensed my mostly progressive classmates and I were at the threat being posed by globalization to the rich variety of languages and dialects found among the indigenous populations of Africa, Asia, Oceania, and Central and South America. The villains in these stories were generally American, European, or generically Western corporations, governments, or both.

While this was and remains a real issue, Ms Emerick points out that the same thing is happening, but with much less fanfare, outrage, or even awareness, among the people, languages, and dialects of Europe. Once again, globalization is the culprit, but this time, it is not Europeans going out into the world that are causing the problems, but the rest of the world pouring into Europe.

For us in the U.S., the leveling and conforming effect of American culture – while not entirely bad, when utilized to build a reasonably cohesive, unified society – and the standardizing effect of modern media and marketing, have combined to blunt and minimize our awareness of the distinctiveness, particularity, and vibrancy of various European cultures, languages, dialects, and their associated customs and traditions.

The result has been to lend an element of “truthiness” to the false narrative that “white people have no culture,” and we must therefore import “diversity” from elsewhere in the world. And it is sadly true that, all too often, Walmart, cable TV (and increasingly the internet), and professional sports seem to be the limit of many Americans’ cultural experience.

The reality, however, is that Europe and Europeans are replete with cultural and linguistic diversity! But it is a diversity which is under threat. With respect to Britain, the major focus of The Anglophilic Anglican, Ms Emerick notes that

“The United Kingdom is home to many forms of Celtic language as well as dozens of dialects of English, many of which have close roots to the original speech of the first Anglo-Saxons. 

“But, instead of making an effort to preserve this important cultural heritage, the U.K. government is making concessions for illegal immigrants and using taxes of hard working British people to pay for foreigners who live off their taxes and refuse to work.

“These unemployed migrants then reproduce in vast numbers. But native Britons will consistently tell you that they cannot afford to have more children. What is going on here? Native Europeans are being taxed for their own demographic replacement.”

This is, to say the least, problematic! And that is putting it very gently. One must ask oneself, what is the rationale, what is the reasoning, what is the sense in this apparent drive to self-immolation on the part of many in Europe?

If it is to gain cheap workers – which I’m sure was at least part of the initial impetus – it has been demonstrated repeatedly that most of those coming in from Africa and Middle East have little desire to work; they are there to live off the European social safety net… which will shortly be strained to the breaking point, if it is not already.

And if it is to atone for Nazism, colonialism, or any other real or imagined evil of the 19th and 20th centuries, one must inquire, how much self-flagellation is enough? How much is too much?

With immigrants responsible for a vastly disproportionate amount of crime – including rape and sexual grooming for prostitution – to the point of over-stretching the police forces of several European countries, and insisting on special considerations in every area from law to cuisine from their erstwhile hosts, how much of this orgy of cultural masochism – even cultural suicide – can Europe endure?

Because unlike the immigrants, Europeans have no other homeland. They cannot return to their home countries, for they are there already. Their backs are to the wall. If Europe does not remain hospitable to Europeans, they will be homeless indeed… and 40 or 50,000 years of European ethnic and cultural evolution and development will be ended.

Is it worth it, for the false promise of pseudo-“diversity” and a mockery of “multiculturalism,” in a continent which has, historically, embodied the terms? Europe has a plenitude of diversity – linguistically, culturally, ethnically. This is a fact which needs to be celebrated, not suppressed!

But as with all other areas of problem-solving, the first step is to admit that we have a problem, in the first place…

“Have Heart; For We are on the Cusp of Great Cultural Revolution”

Our culture has been under intense attack by a cabal of globalist elites. Western Cultural Revolution starts NOW.

Source: Have Heart; For We are on the Cusp of Great Cultural Revolution

“The times in which we are living are more polarizing than ever in recent memory. Thus, people are separated by extremes, reactivity, and heated emotion.  But, at the same time, a Great Awakening is under way, and it is important to highlight some important points, re-calibrate, and focus our directive moving forward.”

A provocative essay, yes, but interesting, and worthy of consideration. Much of what Ms Emerick says rings true. I have said for some time and in a variety of fora that the contemporary push for “diversity” and “multiculturalism” is actually anti-diversity and will lead, eventually, to a drab and oppressive monoculture.

True diversity, and true multiculturalism, is about protecting and preserving the particularity and distinctiveness of individual cultures – and those primarily in their historic and geographic context – not attempting to forcibly blend all cultures and ethnicities into one drab, muddy mess, like indiscriminately mixing the colours on an artist’s palette.

One goes to a buffet to enjoy the variety of foods presented: one does not generally dump them in a blender at the end, and sip the resulting slurry through a straw. The same holds true with cultures and ethnicities, which should be a vibrant tapestry, woven from bright colours and distinctive strands, not a coarsely-woven stretch of burlap with no discernible pattern.

And of course, as a person of European – primarily North-Western European – heritage myself, I am most concerned with what I see as a concerted and vigorous effort to dilute, disparage, and do away with the history, cultural distinctives, and even the ethnic particularities of the people of the West: Europeans, both at home in their European homeland, and abroad, in the great European diaspora which includes the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa.

Fortunately, as Ms Emerick points out, more people across the world – and especially the Western world – are beginning to wake up to the importance of preserving one’s own people, and their history and cultural heritage. Of course, that only makes the forces of destruction and suppression more hysterical and violent in their attempts to force their ideology on the rest of us. Like ISIS chiseling away at or blowing up priceless and irreplaceable antiquities, they want to do as much damage as possible in the time they have left.

Their tactics range from the use of slurs like “far right” (which to them, describes anyone to the right of hard-Left), “Nazi” or “fascist,” “racist,” “xenophobic,” and many more, to vandalism and destruction or removal (sometimes by governmental bodies that should know better) of statues, monuments, plaques, and other iconography, renaming of streets, schools, etc., to outright physical attacks.

The most extreme of the latter thus far has been the mass shooting in Las Vegas by a left-wing activist, against people he apparently figured were “safely” conservative. But of course, the riots in Ferguson, Baltimore, and elsewhere also fall into this category. And attacks on monuments and other iconography have moved – as I have long expected and predicted – from Confederate icons to the likes of Francis Scott Key, “Teddy” Roosevelt, and even George Washington.

The only bright side to this is that the more aggressive and extreme these attacks become, the more people will wake up to the danger we are all collectively in by this attempt to re-write history and suppress anyone who stands against the dangerous ideology of radical globalism and demographic blending. To quote Ms Emerick again:

“​A cabal of globalist elites has a very dark future in store for us, and it is their agenda that has been guiding our media and education for several decades now. But, we are NOT willing to go like sheep to the slaughter. We are NOT willing see the cultures of our ancestors washed away. ALL of the people of this world have a right to protect and preserve their cultural heritage. …

“We in the West have an incredible legacy to be proud of.  While these cultural Marxists sneer at “old white men,” instead we must look to our glorious past and remind everyone of the greatness that our Folk have been capable of. While the globalists push destruction of our culture, we must face it by celebrating our culture with more gusto than ever before. When they misrepresent our history, we must tell our OWN story with pride.”

To which I can only say, Amen!

Evola: “Capitalism just as subversive as Marxism…”

Capitalism just as subversive as marxism

I have not read much Evola – just a few quotes here and there – but I agree with this. Economics, while important for survival (the word means, literally, “household management” – Greek oikos + nomos), is a means to an end: one which is too-often treated as if it were an end in itself.

The high and ultimate things – religion, e.g., the proper relationship between God and Man, and philosophy, including ethics and morality, e.g., the quest for a right relationship between and among humans, as well as something like Aldo Leopold’s “land ethic” – must come first, and serve as the basis for the practical, instrumental considerations which follow, including economics.

By placing economics at the forefront and letting our values flow from there, I believe, we as a society are currently putting the cart before the horse!

You will note that these “high and ultimate things” are closely interrelated, not separate and distinct: I have spoken and written elsewhere about the importance of re-weaving the connections between and among God, Nature, and Humankind – that is to say, adopting a truly holistic view of the world (cosmos) and our place within it.

Economics has a role in this process, and it is an essential one. But it is or should be a supporting role, not a lead role. An analogy might be architecture, in which support structures such as pillars, arches, etc., are absolutely essential to the construction and support of a building – and which ones are chosen is far from irrelevant! – but they are not the purpose of the building.

This is where we have gone wrong in our treatment of economics, in my opinion, whether capitalist or Marxist in orientation. And this is, I think, the point of the Evola quote, above.

The Ancestor Effect: Thinking about our roots boosts intellect and confidence

We all know that giving thanks [for our ancestral heritage] is something we “should” be doing. But recently a clinical study reported that thinking positively about our family roots boosts emotional confidence and even intelligence.

Source: The DreamTribe – The Ancestor Effect: Thinking about our roots boosts intellect and confidence

The 2010 study, published in the European Journal of Social Psychology, comprised four studies that pitted those who think about their roots versus those who don’t before taking a battery of problem solving and intelligence tests… Results indicated that both groups that looked back performed significantly better on the problem-solving test than the control…

So keep your ancestors close at hand. Every day, think about the people who are responsible for putting you on the planet. Consider their hard work throughout the ages, their resilience in tough times, and their ingenuity. Even a simple five-minute meditation in the beginning of the day can instill confidence that spills over into your decision making and your ability to deal with the problems that arise today.

Making space in your home can focus this daily meditation and remind you of your roots when you go about your daily life. Find a photograph of a family member who has passed on and who you particularly admire. Frame it and keep it visible in a part of the house you see every day. Make it a daily ritual to give thanks by spending a moment looking at this photograph or some other object from the past. Even better, set up a shelf for ancestral remembrances and spend a minute a day looking upon it and thinking of those who came before.

Roots matter. Rootedness matters. Some of us knew this instinctively, intuitively. But it’s still nice to see studies confirming it!


[The photograph is from a recreated Midsummer celebration at The Viking Way – a very immersive way to get in touch with one’s roots!]