What Do Europeans Think About Muslim Immigration? | Chatham House

New research points to significant and widespread levels of public anxiety over immigration from mainly Muslim states.

The Chatham House article is most interesting: it appears that, once again (as is very often – not always, but very often – the case), the ordinary people of Europe have more sense than their alleged “leaders.” To wit:

Drawing on a unique, new Chatham House survey of more than 10,000 people from 10 European states, we can throw new light on what people think about migration from mainly Muslim countries. Our results are striking and sobering. They suggest that public opposition to any further migration from predominantly Muslim states is by no means confined to Trump’s electorate in the US but is fairly widespread.

In our survey… respondents were given the following statement: ‘All further migration from mainly Muslim countries should be stopped’. They were then asked to what extent did they agree or disagree with this statement. Overall, across all 10 of the European countries an average of 55% agreed that all further migration from mainly Muslim countries should be stopped, 25% neither agreed nor disagreed and 20% disagreed.

Majorities in all but two of the ten states agreed, ranging from 71% in Poland, 65% in Austria, 53% in Germany and 51% in Italy to 47% in the United Kingdom and 41% in Spain. In no country did the percentage that disagreed surpass 32%.

In case that wasn’t clear enough, let me restate: in none of the ten European countries surveyed (Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Spain and the UK) did more than a third disagree with the statement that “All further migration from mainly Muslim countries should be stopped.” The others were either in favor of stopping Islamic immigration, or neutral on the idea.

There is the obligatory observation that there is

“a clear education divide. Of those with secondary level qualifications, 59% opposed further Muslim immigration. By contrast, less than half of all degree holders supported further migration curbs.”

The question that this does not ask, still less answer, however, is whether this supposedly greater support for immigration among those with academic degrees is a function of being “better educated,” per se, or being more thoroughly indoctrinated by the left-leaning academic establishment. I suspect the latter!

This article is a year old, of course; I am only just now seeing it. But somehow, I doubt that attitudes have changed much. If anything, they may have hardened.

Granted that I am basing this observation primarily off of Facebook and YouTube, which tend to point to the more extreme ends of the spectrum: but there is, it seems to me, a simmering frustration on the part of many Europeans over the social-engineering projects of those who seem to consider themselves their “betters.”

The European political establishment seems to be feeling it, too, as they appear to be doubling down on their use of legal enforcement to suppress nationalistic and anti-immigrant sentiments. The problem, of course, is that when you put a lid on a simmering pot, the pressure builds, and you need to add more and more weight to keep the lid on. When it finally blows, it can be quite messy…