While I understand, and even (to a point) sympathize with, those who choose –  for a number of ethical and health-related reasons – to adopt a vegetarian diet, I object to those who attempt to force that lifestyle on the rest of us.

So I found the lower two responses to the upper billboard quite amusing! I tend to fall into the second (lower right) category, although a) I wouldn’t be trying to “bang a hot vegan chick,” and b) it wouldn’t take an economic crisis for me to enjoy a nice dish of hassenpfeffer!


Nota Bene: While I view vegetarianism – especially ovo-, lacto-, and piscato-vegetarianism – as legitimate dietary preferences, I have more issues with veganism, for several reasons.

First, from a physiological and health viewpoint: we are, biologically, anatomically, and ecologically, predatory omnivores. We have more in common, in that regard, with bears or raccoons than we do with horses, cows, or sheep.

That is simple reality, as can be determined from observation of our stereoscopic (hunter, not prey) vision, our dentition (mix of carnivorous and herbivorous teeth), and our digestive system, which is clearly designed to digest both animal proteins and fats, and plant matter – but not exclusively the latter.

By attempting to adopt a plant-only diet, with no supplementation from animal foods at all, we are denying our nature (some would say, our God-given nature). That rarely if ever ends well.

In this context, it is perhaps worth noting that while there have been successful vegetarian societies, historically, there has been no known successful vegan society. That may be because there are nutrients essential not only to our health, but to our reproduction, that come only from animal sources.

Secondly, vegans are more likely to be ideological extremists than are vegetarians who also supplement with dairy, eggs, or fish. And as I indicated above, it is one thing to recognize that someone may choose a particular lifestyle or diet; it is another to have them trying to force that choice on you!

Author: The Anglophilic Anglican

I am an ordained Anglican clergyman, published writer, former op-ed columnist, and experienced outdoor and informal educator. I am also a traditionalist: religiously, philosophically, politically, and socially. I seek to do my bit to promote and restore the Good, the True, and the Beautiful, in a world which has too-often lost touch with all three, and to help re-weave the connections between God, Nature, and humankind which our techno-industrial civilization has strained and broken.

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