Hillary Clinton: Conservatives Were Right on Mass Migration | The American Conservative

Progressives melt down after the Democratic doyenne denounces open borders here and in Europe.

Source: Hillary Clinton: Conservatives Were Right on Mass Migration | The American Conservative

“Amidst the hurly-burly of politics these days, it can be hard to notice when your side has won a victory. Yet that’s what’s just happened for conservatives on immigration: they’ve won. Okay, it’s not a final victory, nor even a crushing victory, but, even so, it’s a win.

“We know this because Hillary Clinton, arguably still the biggest name in Democratic politics, has just said that conservatives were right. She has conceded the essence of the rightist—and, by the way, centrist—critique of the open-borders approach to immigration.”

As my late father would have said, “even a stopped clock is right twice a day!” The Left is apparently apoplectic; but Ms Clinton is indeed correct. As this piece notes,

“On November 22, Clinton said in an interview with The Guardian, ‘I think Europe needs to get a handle on migration because that is what lit the flame.’ Continuing in that vein, she damned German Chancellor Angela Merkel with faint praise: ‘I admire the very generous and compassionate approaches that were taken particularly by leaders like Angela Merkel, but I think it is fair to say Europe has done its part, and must send a very clear message—‘we are not going to be able to continue provide refuge and support’—because if we don’t deal with the migration issue it will continue to roil the body politic.’ In other words, when Merkel opened the German border in 2015, she was being nice, but misguided.”

She may be couching it in terms of the immigration issue dangerously stirring the political pot, but that is still a striking admission on the part of Ms Clinton. Interesting, the other Obama-era Secretary of State, John Kerry, has also weighed in on the issue:

“in yet another Guardian interview, former Democratic presidential nominee John Kerry went further: ‘Europe is already crushed under this transformation that is taking place due to migration.’

“Indeed, Kerry went even further than that; he directly linked the open borders issue to the demography of Africa, albeit choosing to argue through the prism of climate change. As he said, ‘Imagine what happens if water dries up and you cannot produce food in northern Africa. Imagine what happens if Nigeria hits its alleged 500 million people by the middle of the century… you are going to have hordes of people in the northern part of the Mediterranean knocking on the door. I am telling you. If you don’t believe me, just go read the literature.'”

Once again, a pretty remarkable admission, coming from another of the poster children of the contemporary Left! The essay goes on to note,

“Undeniably, a new hard-nosed pessimism about population flows is creeping into the discussion, even among the Davos Men. In September, tycoon-turned-philanthropist Bill Gates said, perhaps somewhat awkwardly, that African population growth was ‘the elephant in the room.'”

The irony in this is that the current African population explosion is the direct result of the copious agricultural and medical aid which Western – American and European – countries have provided to Africa since the 1970s. It could be argued that the West has helped to facilitate its own possible demise. Had we been as proactive in promoting birth control in “developing” countries as we were in promoting other advances, we might not now be in this situation!

In related news, the climate for the United Nation’s Global Compact for Safe, Orderly, and Regular Migration has cooled markedly. The Compact, “an international amnesty lawyer’s dream,” the goal of which is arguably to legalize illegal immigration – which emerged from the UN General Assembly in 2016, with the hearty endorsement of the Obama administration, the German government, and, of course, George Soros – is widely and justly reviled by those who care about national sovereignty and protection of territorial and demographic integrity.

But now, two years later, the Trump administration has announced that it will not sign the document, and has been joined by Israel, Australia, and a half-dozen European countries including Austria, Hungary, and Slovakia. Governments in these countries have voiced several objections, among other things asserting that the compact mixes up the rights of asylum-seekers with those of economic migrants. The Compact is scheduled to be adopted at a December inter-governmental conference in Marrakesh, Morocco. It will be interesting to see what happens!

In any case, as the linked article notes, “the threaded issues of nationalism, national security, and national sovereignty are bigger than any one incident — or any one nation. That is, the desire of countries to determine their own destiny, out from under some utopian international regime, has been awakened, and is unlikely to go back to sleep any time soon.” And that, I think, is as it should be.

Advertisements

Tony Esolen on sexual hedonism

“The sexual equivalent to the rejection of culture is a crass and mechanistic hedonism, seeking the pleasure of the day for its own sake… So one body preys upon another, and the last thing in the mind of either “partner” – note the business term – is that what they are doing should partake of time long past and time to come. The man is planting seed that contains within itself unnumbered generations, and the woman bears the egg, the haven for that seed, to be penetrated by it and fertilized, so that what begins from that moment is a new human life, a new instantiation of the divine image, a new dweller in time, oriented to eternity. That is in fact what is happening, but the hedonist denies it. He says that the child-making thing is not for making children.”

— Dr. Anthony Esolen, professor of English Renaissance and classical literature at Thomas More College of Liberal Arts, in Nostalgia: Going Home in a Homeless World

QOTD: The difference between a terrorist and a warrior

“That is how you tell the difference between a terrorist and a warrior. A warrior makes themselves a human shield to protect the innocent. A terrorist uses the innocent as a human shield to protect themselves.”

— Mark Balzer (prior service, US Navy)

“Military guys” standing strong, and protecting their fellow-students – at the risk of their own lives. Because that’s what military guys do.

Source: John Gray- Journalist & Writer | November 28, 2016 at 3:25 PM

From two years ago:

“Lost in all the chaos at Ohio State University today was something that most people probably missed. About an hour into it, when everyone was ‘sheltering in place’ all over campus, CNN took a phone call from a young woman who was locked inside a classroom right near where the suspect was hurting people. She said she was a graduate student and she and many others were huddled together scared and not sure what was happening outside. Then she said something made me tear up.

“She said casually to the TV anchor over the phone, ‘But we happened to have a few ‘military guys’ in my class and the minute we got the text message alert of an ‘active shooter on campus’ they moved the rest of us away from the door and then all of them stood guard right by the door.’ She said they were standing there as she spoke making certain if a shooter or someone with a knife or whatever calamity tried to come through that door, they would be the first thing he’d see and they’d stop it and protect the other students or die trying.

“These guys weren’t armed, I’m guessing they weren’t in uniform, they were just students who happened to have military training. Those ‘military guys’ instantly put themselves on the clock and assumed the position to protect those unarmed, vulnerable students.

“I thought that was impressive. I thought that was brave. I thought that was oh so very American.

“I also thought you’d want to know.”

I teared up, too, reading this – two years ago, and again today. God bless them! Guess this is what the Left calls “toxic masculinity.” Seems to me we could use a lot more of it.


Here’s another account of the incident:

“As a suspect carried out a savage attack at Ohio State University on Monday, members of the U.S. military in one classroom heroically stood by the door to protect others, a student told CNN.

“‘We have quite a few military men in our class, who are actually all standing by the doors, keeping us safe,’ OSU student Molly Clarke said. ‘I’m feeling pretty good about that.'”

And here are my comments, from when I posted this on my Facebook page:

As Fred (“Mister”) Rogers used to say, “look for the helpers.” Smiling through tears… God bless these “military guys,” who stood up and moved forward to guard and protect their fellow students! And from the comments I’ve read and other posts I’ve seen, this was not the only class where that happened. Other OSU students with military or police training also stood forward to defend their fellow students. And I’ll bet they didn’t ask who they had voted for, first!

I know I wasn’t going to post political stuff, but this has to be said: this, folks, is why I have zero – ZERO – respect for those who take a knee or sit through the National Anthem, trample the Flag, or otherwise disrespect either our country or its symbols. Don’t like something? Fine. Work to change it, using our Constitutional processes. Freedom of speech? Fine, speak out against the things you don’t like, but don’t demonize those with whom you do not agree.

You are free to disagree, in fact [principled] dissent is part of what has made our nation great. But do not disrespect the symbols of our country, or the men and women who have fought and died – and continue to be willing to do so – to protect you and your right to disagree. Not if you expect me to have an ounce of respect for you, or what you stand for! Again, God bless those who put their lives on the line to protect others: at OSU, and daily throughout this nation and the world.

50 Years of Effete and Infertile Liturgical Culture Is Enough – Crisis Magazine

“There is only one thing to do: for the future of the Church, we must build again, drawing on those cultural accomplishments that are timeless, in the service of Christ, who is the same yesterday, today, and tomorrow, in saecula saeculorum.”

— Dr. Anthony Esolen

Source: 50 Years of Effete and Infertile Liturgical Culture Is Enough – Crisis Magazine

From the incomparable Anthony Esolen​:

“I am struck by the strange inability of the council fathers to do the very thing they were urging the Church to do, which was to take stock of the times. Again and again, they instruct bishops and priests to adapt the life of the Church, including her places and manner of worship, to the times and to the characters of the various peoples of the world.

“What they missed, and what was right in front of them to be noticed, was that modernism as an ideology, with mass entertainment and mass education as its main engines, was obliterating cultures everywhere. Romano Guardini had written of this loss in The End of the Modern World.

“It was therefore the task of the Church not to be enculturated in a vacuum, which would be akin to emptying herself of her peculiar character, but to be herself and thereby to form culture, i.e., to bring culture once again to people who were rapidly losing their hold on all cultural memory.”

He is speaking of the Roman Catholic fathers of the Second Vatican Council, but his words apply equally to most “mainstream” churches in this day, including mainstream Anglican ones. He continues,

“This did not happen. It would have required profound meditation upon the meaning of culture, by churchmen steeped in the learning of three thousand years of Jewish and Christian arts and letters, and of the Greco-Roman matrix wherein the Church, by the providence of God, was brought to birth. However, schools and universities were abandoning that learning by throwing it overboard as ballast.”

I have commented more than once, in more fora than one, on our collective tendency to throw out the baby with the bathwater! So it is good to hear a scholar with the eminence of Dr. Esolen confirming my intuition. Here he is again:

“I am aware that the Church has often had to prune back an excessive exuberance in the arts, so that the visible would not overmaster the invisible… [however,] we now have the worst of both worlds.”

In other words, mainstream contemporary churches have given up “the glory that was Greece and the grandeur that was Rome” – by which I mean both culturally, as representing the core of Western civilization and, if by Greece is understood Eastern and by Rome Western Catholic Christianity, theologically and spiritually – for a doctrinally and aesthetically diluted and diminished form of Christianity which fails to uphold “the faith once delivered to the saints” (Jude 1:3), and which embraces vapid kitsch in what passes for liturgical art, music, and architecture.

In traditional Anglicanism, there is another challenge to be met: on the one hand a too-eager, overly enthusiastic embrace of Anglo-Catholicism to the point of seeking to become Rome without the Pope; and on the other, an Anglo-Calvinistic insistence on “Anglicanism as established,” which can almost make an idol of liturgical starkness and simplicity, and which theologically and spiritually threatens to thrust the Anglican tradition into Protestant sectarianism, rather than its true identity as a distinctive expression of the Church Catholic.

It is not as easy as one might suppose to maintain a healthy and fruitful “via media” (middle way) between extremes, “not as a compromise for the sake of peace, but as a comprehension for the sake of truth,” in the words of a Collect for the commemoration of the gifted Anglican divine and champion of that via media, Richard Hooker! Yet it is a task worth undertaking even if we often fall short of its accomplishment. As the great conservationist Aldo Leopold put it, “In these higher aspirations the important thing is not to achieve but to strive.”

The alternative is more of the same, the period and ethos which since Vatican II has transformed (and often not for the better) not only the Roman Catholic Church, but most of the Churches of the West; a period in which, as Dr. Esolen expresses it,

“we have endured fifty years of lousy church buildings, lousy music, lousy art, banal language, lousy schooling, dead and dying religious orders, and an unfaithful faithful whose imaginations are formed more by Hollywood than by the Holy One. We have been stuck in cultural and ecclesial neutral, i.e., rolling backward and downhill… neuter, effete and infertile.”

It is ironic indeed that a movement which was intended to make the Church more “relevant” to contemporary people and culture has had precisely the opposite effect: the more it attempts to ape popular culture, the less relevant it becomes.

For the relevance of the Church has always been in its critique of popular culture, pointing toward things which are higher, timeless and eternal: and ultimately, of course, to God the Three in One, Who is their Source – the perfection of Goodness, Truth, and Beauty, of which our attempts at the same are always but pale reflections. Yet that does not mean we shouldn’t strive toward the higher things, quite the contrary:

“There is only one thing to do: for the future of the Church, we must build again, drawing on those cultural accomplishments that are timeless, in the service of Christ, who is the same yesterday, today, and tomorrow, in saecula saeculorum [unto ages of ages].

Blackburn Cathedral is Muslim territory after Islamic call to prayer | ‘Rebel Priest’ Dr Jules Gomes, Columnist for Republic Standard

When an Imam recited the Adhan in the consecrated space of Blackburn Cathedral the night before Remembrance Day, he was claiming it as Islamic territory.

Source: Blackburn Cathedral is Muslim territory after Islamic call to prayer | ‘Rebel Priest’ Dr Jules Gomes, Columnist for Republic Standard

This is absolutely appalling. How can we – by which I mean Western society in general, and Christians (or people claiming to be Christian) in particular, not, I hope and pray, readers of this blog – be so blind, and so foolish?

Evening Prayer for The Sunday Next Before Advent, 2018

Evening Prayer (Vespers) for The Sunday Next Before Advent, 2018, according to The Book of Common Prayer 1928.