Pope says indigenous people must have final say about their land | Environment | The Guardian

Francis echoes growing body of international law and standards on the right to ‘prior and informed consent’

Source: Pope says indigenous people must have final say about their land | Environment | The Guardian

“Last week… Francis, the first Pope from Latin America, struck a rather different note – for indigenous peoples around the world, for land rights, for better environmental stewardship. He said publicly that indigenous peoples have the right to ‘prior and informed consent.’ In other words, nothing should happen on – or impact – their land, territories and resources unless they agree to it.”

I agree completely – but I wonder if it has occurred to him that such rights also extend to indigenous Europeans…?

 

French Senate says Notre-Dame must be restored exactly how it was | The Local

French Senate says Notre-Dame must be restored exactly how it was

French Senators have stipulated that Notre-Dame cathedral must be restored exactly how it was before the devastating fire that tore through the Paris landmark.

Source: French Senate says Notre-Dame must be restored exactly how it was – The Local

The Senate of France gets it right! Now let’s hope the Assemblée Nationale follows suit:

“On Monday evening, the French Senate approved the government’s Notre-Dame restoration bill – but added a clause that it must be restored to the state it was before the blaze, striking a blow to the government which had launched an international architecture competition to debate ideas on the restoration…

“The Senate has now approved the restoration bill already passed by the French parliament to allow work on the structure to be completed in time for the Paris Olympics in 2024 – but requires that the restoration be faithful to the ‘last known visual state’ of the cathedral, in an attempt to check the government, which has launched an international architectural competition soliciting designs for renovation.”

Unfortunately,

“Because of the changes imposed, the bill cannot now pass directly in to law, so the Senate and the Assemblée nationale will now attempt to come to an agreement on a version of the bill that will become law.”

Praying that the National Assembly concurs! Dieu sauve la France! Et que Dieu sauve Notre Dame!

“What REALLY Happened Yesterday in Oldham” | Tommy Robinson

Hey, Tommy Tommy! Tommy, Tommy, Tommy, Tommy Robinson!

I cannot guarantee that you’ll be able to see this video. At the least, there will be an “offensive content” screen to click through, and most of its features will be disabled. But at least I was able to view it, and hopefully you will be, too.

Robinson was campaigning for a slot as an MEP – Member of the European Parliament – in this weekend’s elections; sadly, that campaign was not successful.

But whether you like him or not, whether you agree with him or not, this video – showing the local police doing absolutely zilch while armed Islamic thugs, many of them brought in from out-of-town, throw bricks, rocks, bottles, and even scissors at his supporters, including women and children, gathered for a campaign rally – shows all too clearly the situation in Britain at present.

Dear God in heaven, what has happened to “England’s green and pleasant land”…?

 

European elections results: Far-right and pro-Green parties win votes | Metro News

Italy's Matteo Salvini, France's Marine Le Pen and Nigel Farage

Europe saw a coming-of-age moment for the eurosceptic far-right movement in the European elections results 2019.

Source: European elections results: Far-right and pro-Green parties win votes | Metro News

Four days of voting for national representatives to the European Parliament ended Sunday with major gains by nationalist / populist parties (“far right” = eurosceptic, opposed to globalism, mass migration, and other aspects of the Left-wing agenda).

Italian Deputy Prime Minister, Interior Minister, and de facto popular leader Matteo Salvini “told RAI state television that his League [Lega, formerly Lega Nord, the Northern League], Marine Le Pen’s National Rally and Nigel Farage’s Brexit Party together should control 90 seats and that other populist parties could bring the number to at least 150.”

Meanwhile, in Britain, former UKIP leader Nigel Farage’s weeks-old Brexit party won 28 seats, against 16 for the Liberal Democrats. Traditional powerhouse Labour took only 10, and the once-mighty Conservative Party, known as the Tories, four. Even the Greens beat the Tories, with seven!

Although the linked article notes that “Despite making gains, the vote was hardly the watershed anticipated by Europe’s far-right populists” [see above…] “who have vowed to dilute the European Union from within in favour of national sovereignty,” it was a very definite wake-up call – indeed, a hard slap in the face – to traditional “centrist” parties.

An interesting point is that the other major gainers were Leftist parties, including the Greens; clearly, much of Europe’s population is tired of “business as usual.” With the sloppy center on record as refusing to make alliance with the nationalist / populists, it will be fascinating – to say the least – to see where European politics goes from here!

Rogation Sunday and Rogationtide

 

Rogationtide – My Book of the Church's Year
From My Book of the Church’s Year, by Enid M. Chadwick. London: Mowbrays (no date).

So, what is Rogation Sunday, and Rogationtide (a.k.a., the Rogation Days), anyway…? The lovely Anglican blog, “Full Homely Divinity,” explains:

“The week of the Sixth Sunday of Easter [note: for those of us using the traditional calendar, the Fifth Sunday after Easter] is busy with processions and outdoor activities. The week begins with prayers and celebrations that focus on stewardship of creation and culminates in the great (but lately much-neglected) Feast of the Ascension of our Lord into heaven on the fortieth day of the Paschal Feast.

“The Rogation Days, the Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday before Ascension Day, originated in Vienne, France (not Vienna, Austria), in 470 after a series of natural disasters had caused much suffering among the people. Archbishop Mamertus proclaimed a fast and ordered that special litanies and prayers be said as the population processed around their fields, asking God’s protection and blessing on the crops that were just beginning to sprout.

“The Latin word rogare means ‘to ask,’ thus these were ‘rogation’ processions. In an agricultural society, closely connected with the soil and highly vulnerable to the uncertainties of nature, this was an idea that took root quickly, and the custom spread around Europe and over to Britain. The Sunday before the Rogation Days came to be considered a part of Rogationtide (or ‘Rogantide’) and was known as Rogation Sunday.”

Thus, the blessing of crops, and from that, a more general sense of exercising good, due, and proper stewardship of Creation, is an important part of this day, and this Tide.

Furthermore, there developed in England the concept of “the beating of the bounds,” in which the Rogation Procession made its way around the bounds of the parish, reaffirming a sense of place, and instructing the young in the geography of home, and significant locations, sites, and features within those bounds. Because those boundaries were sometimes transgressed, it also provided an opportunity to reconcile with one’s erring neighbors.

Another excellent blog, “The Homely Hours,” notes,

“George Herbert gave the following reasons to observe the Rogation Days, that are still practical for us today: 1) [asking] a blessing of God for the fruits of the field; 2) Justice in the preservation of the bounds; 3) Charitie, in living, walking and neighbourliy accompanying one another, with reconciling of differences at that time, if they be any; 4) Mercie, in relieving the poor by a liberal distribution of largess which at that time is or oght be made.

The author of that blog, Amanda, further recounts, “I remember the first time I participated in our church’s Rogation Day ‘Beating of the Bounds.’ I was deeply impressed by the way that the Rogation Days took seriously the life of the body in the world.”

So should we all!

The conundrums of being an English Royalist…!

Ah, the conflicts… 😏

Image may contain: 1 person, suit and text

Glossary:

thew : Old English thēawcustom, usage; cognate with Old High German thau (later dau), discipline.

witanegemot : advisory council to the king, which also “elected” each new king by acclamation – none could be king without consent of the Witan.

eardland : homeland, native land or region; probably descended from a Proto-Indo-European root meaning “plough-lands” (cf. “ard,” a primitive plough).

The German National Anthem (Deutschlandlied) | Germany Tourism and Travel / Everything about Germany

Source: The Germany National Anthem (Deutschlandlied) – Germany Tourism and Travel by Everything about Germany

The site notes that although “nationalism is unfairly, and incorrectly, linked to Nazism (the U.S., for instance, has been heavily nationalistic since its birth, and has been the most ardent defender of true liberty and justice for all), Germany itself has a long, rich history outside of the Hitler era.” Indeed!

In fact, the Deutschlandlied itself was written at a time of considerable liberal, even revolutionary, ferment, as German liberal nationalists pushed for unification of the many German kingdoms, principalities, and duchies (at a time when the nation-state was seen to be more liberal and progressive than ancient kingdoms). In fact, the line that seems the most grossly militaristic –

“Germany, Germany, over all: over everything in the world!”

– actually represents a plea for Germans of all states, from Prussia to Bavaria, to place their common unity above merely local concerns. But this is hardly the first song to be misunderstood, when heard out of context! Of course, some of the places listed as being part of “Greater Germany” are part of other countries, now. But territorial borders were a good deal more flexible, in the mid-19th century…

In any case, it’s difficult not to like a song that contains affirmations of

“German women, German loyalty,
German beer, and German song!”

English translation (variations exist):

Germany, Germany over all
Over everything in the world!
When it comes to protecting and defending,
Our unity unites us.
From the Maas to the Memel,
From the Etsch to the Belt:
Germany, Germany over all
Over everything in the world!
Germany, Germany over all
Over everything in the world!

German wives and fidelity,
German wine and melody,
Shall all persevere in the world.
Their fair and ancient tone,
Resounds in us our noble goal
Throughout our entire lives.
German women, German loyalty,
German beer, and German song!
German women, German loyalty,
German beer, and German song!

Unity, justice, and liberty
For the Fatherland!
Let us all strive for that,
In brotherhood with heart and hand!
Unity, justice, and liberty
Are the foundation for happiness:
Bloom in the radiance of this happiness,
Flourish, O Fatherland!
Bloom in the radiance of this happiness,
Flourish, O Fatherland!

A tale of two eras – Fr. Robert Hart | The Continuum

Image result for fr robert hart

For the last few years I have made it clear that Anglicans cannot use the words “Catholic” and “Protestant” to mean two opposite and irreconcilable positions, or even to mean mutually exclusive  positions. For us a good Protestant (in the Anglican sense) has to be a good Catholic, and vice versa…

Source: The Continuum: A tale of two eras

“What really separates English Reformation theology and the Oxford Movement is simply time. It is not a matter of disagreement. Time created its own emergencies, needing doctrinal clarification…

“The strength of Anglicanism today is that we have the restoration of Evangelical truth in our foundation, and we have the fullness of Catholic faith, worship and sacramental practice. We did not obtain this great inheritance by excluding any portion of the Faith of the Universal Church, but by possessing it all.

“One need of our era is to correct the misperceptions of Schools X and Y, and refuse to be pressured into losing part of our wealth by taking unnecessary losses through false choices.”

In my opinion, this essay by Fr. Robert Hart expresses very effectively and persuasively (*) what I believe is the proper balance in the Anglican tradition as truly Reformed Catholic: that is, occupying – dare I say? – an appropriate “Via Media” between the extreme High-Church Anglo-Catholic and extreme Low-Church Evangelical positions.

My recommendation? As I have written many times in this blog, borrowing a line from one of our more famous Prayer Book Collects: “read, mark, learn and inwardly digest“!


(* Despite what, Fr. Hart’s disclaimer / explanation in the comments notwithstanding, I cannot help but think is a slight caricature of the late-medieval, pre-Reformation English Church (I tend to take a more irenic view of Eamon Duffy’s evidence and interpretations)… but only slight.)

How Did Lewis and Tolkien Defend the Old West? | The Imaginative Conservative

https://anglophilicanglican.files.wordpress.com/2019/05/screen-shot-2016-07-11-at-10.20.02-am.png

“I look East, West, North, South, and I do not see Sauron. But I see that Saruman has many descendants. We Hobbits have against them no magic weapons. Yet, my gentle hobbits, I give you this toast: To the Hobbits. May they outlast the Sarumans and see spring again in the trees.”

— J.R.R. Tolkien

Source: How Did Lewis and Tolkien Defend the Old West? | The Imaginative Conservative

Would you better understand, not only those great authors, thinkers, and defenders of Western Christendom (note: “Old West,” here, does not mean “cowboys and Indians”), C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien, but also the world we live in, how we got here, and where it may lead, should we continue on our present trajectory? Then read this essay! Long, but worth it.


N.B. – There are a few, mostly minor, issues of spelling and/or proofreading in this rather lengthy essay (doubtless I have many in my own writings, as well). Most are minor, and easily forgiven (the youngest companion of Frodo, in the Fellowship of the Ring, was Pippin, not “Pippen”), but one at least is significant:

The favorite haunt of the Hobbits was “a well-farmed countryside,” not “a well-armed countryside.” They did indeed turn out to be fairly well-armed, at the last, but with hunting arms, not weapons of war. Hobbits were, as Tolkien notes, not a warlike people!