The German National Anthem (Deutschlandlied) | Germany Tourism and Travel / Everything about Germany

Source: The Germany National Anthem (Deutschlandlied) – Germany Tourism and Travel by Everything about Germany

The site notes that although “nationalism is unfairly, and incorrectly, linked to Nazism (the U.S., for instance, has been heavily nationalistic since its birth, and has been the most ardent defender of true liberty and justice for all), Germany itself has a long, rich history outside of the Hitler era.” Indeed!

In fact, the Deutschlandlied itself was written at a time of considerable liberal, even revolutionary, ferment, as German liberal nationalists pushed for unification of the many German kingdoms, principalities, and duchies (at a time when the nation-state was seen to be more liberal and progressive than ancient kingdoms). In fact, the line that seems the most grossly militaristic –

“Germany, Germany, over all: over everything in the world!”

– actually represents a plea for Germans of all states, from Prussia to Bavaria, to place their common unity above merely local concerns. But this is hardly the first song to be misunderstood, when heard out of context! Of course, some of the places listed as being part of “Greater Germany” are part of other countries, now. But territorial borders were a good deal more flexible, in the mid-19th century…

In any case, it’s difficult not to like a song that contains affirmations of

“German women, German loyalty,
German beer, and German song!”

English translation (variations exist):

Germany, Germany over all
Over everything in the world!
When it comes to protecting and defending,
Our unity unites us.
From the Maas to the Memel,
From the Etsch to the Belt:
Germany, Germany over all
Over everything in the world!
Germany, Germany over all
Over everything in the world!

German wives and fidelity,
German wine and melody,
Shall all persevere in the world.
Their fair and ancient tone,
Resounds in us our noble goal
Throughout our entire lives.
German women, German loyalty,
German beer, and German song!
German women, German loyalty,
German beer, and German song!

Unity, justice, and liberty
For the Fatherland!
Let us all strive for that,
In brotherhood with heart and hand!
Unity, justice, and liberty
Are the foundation for happiness:
Bloom in the radiance of this happiness,
Flourish, O Fatherland!
Bloom in the radiance of this happiness,
Flourish, O Fatherland!

A tale of two eras – Fr. Robert Hart | The Continuum

Image result for fr robert hart

For the last few years I have made it clear that Anglicans cannot use the words “Catholic” and “Protestant” to mean two opposite and irreconcilable positions, or even to mean mutually exclusive  positions. For us a good Protestant (in the Anglican sense) has to be a good Catholic, and vice versa…

Source: The Continuum: A tale of two eras

“What really separates English Reformation theology and the Oxford Movement is simply time. It is not a matter of disagreement. Time created its own emergencies, needing doctrinal clarification…

“The strength of Anglicanism today is that we have the restoration of Evangelical truth in our foundation, and we have the fullness of Catholic faith, worship and sacramental practice. We did not obtain this great inheritance by excluding any portion of the Faith of the Universal Church, but by possessing it all.

“One need of our era is to correct the misperceptions of Schools X and Y, and refuse to be pressured into losing part of our wealth by taking unnecessary losses through false choices.”

In my opinion, this essay by Fr. Robert Hart expresses very effectively and persuasively (*) what I believe is the proper balance in the Anglican tradition as truly Reformed Catholic: that is, occupying – dare I say? – an appropriate “Via Media” between the extreme High-Church Anglo-Catholic and extreme Low-Church Evangelical positions.

My recommendation? As I have written many times in this blog, borrowing a line from one of our more famous Prayer Book Collects: “read, mark, learn and inwardly digest“!


(* Despite what, Fr. Hart’s disclaimer / explanation in the comments notwithstanding, I cannot help but think is a slight caricature of the late-medieval, pre-Reformation English Church (I tend to take a more irenic view of Eamon Duffy’s evidence and interpretations)… but only slight.)