The charge of the Winged Hussars: the lifting of the Siege of Vienna

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Some further details on the lifting of the Siege of Vienna:

On this day in history, September 12, 1683, the combined forces of the Holy Roman (German) Empire and the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (the Holy League), under the overall command of King Jan III Sobieski of Poland, moved into position to engage the Ottoman Turkish besiegers outside the walls of Vienna. Fierce clashes followed. Imperial / Holy League forces made headway against the Ottoman invaders, but were unable to conclusively defeat them.

At around 3:00 in the afternoon, King Jan began to move his cavalry into position. As they came out of the woods and began to form up, they were greeted with enthusiastic cheers by the allied troops. An hour later, about four o’clock, the Polish Winged Hussars launched an attack which battered the Turkish lines, causing great consternation and forcing the Turkish general to retreat to a more favorable position. Infantry forces continued the fight against the Ottomans.

At six o’clock came the final blow. In the largest cavalry charge in history, King Jan Sobieski launched 18,000 cavalry, led by his 3,000 Winged Hussars, against the Ottoman lines. They clove through the Turks like the proverbial “hot knife through butter,” breaking and scattering them completely and driving them from the field. As the attack crested, the Austrian defenders of Vienna sallied from their city to join in, adding the crowning blow.

The siege of Vienna had been broken, and the decades to follow would see the Muslim Turks driven almost completely out of Christian Europe. After the battle, King Jan III Sobieski (who would receive the title Defensor Fidei – “Defender of the Faith” – from Pope Innocent XI) reportedly announced, in an intentional modification of Julius Caesar’s famous phrase, “Veni, vidi, Deus vicit” — “I came, I saw, God conquered.”

Footnote: the Lithuanians have not been mentioned. That’s because King Jan left his kingdom almost completely undefended, bringing his entire army to the relief of Vienna! As a result, the Hungarians decided to take advantage of the situation and try to take Polish territory. The Lithuanians, also marching toward Vienna, turned aside to counter-attack the Hungarians. They were successful in driving them back, but it meant that the Lithuanian army did not arrive at Vienna until several days after the siege had been broken.

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Glories of the West: Europe’s rise… and decay

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“Europe’s rise is written in the terms of Christianity & Monarchy, Europe’s decay in the terms of Republicanism, Progressivism, & Godlessness.”

— Erik von Kuehnelt-Leddihn

The Glories of the West: the beauty of European women

This is Europe – dirndl-wearing maidens

The beauty of European women is striking, and so is their variety! There is more than a little irony in the fact that globalists and Leftist claim that the reason for their desire to replace Europeans (and people of European descent in America, Australian, South Africa, and elsewhere) with non-European immigrants is a quest for “diversity.”

I have spoken before to the point that if their desire was truly for diversity and multiculturalism, they would do all they could to foster diverse cultures and peoples in their own historic and geographic context, not seek to mix them up all over the world (but of course, mostly in what have historically been European-majority lands).

But just consider this one point: they claim they want “diversity.” European women (and men, too, of course) have a stunning diversity of hair and eye colours. Even of the two lovely young women in this picture, one is a dark blonde, the other a light brunette; it’s hard to tell from the pic, but I suspect their eye colors differ, as well.

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In the name of “diversity,” the Leftist lunatics want to import an ever-increasing number of people who, other characteristics aside, are uniformly characterized by black hair and brown eyes. Where is the diversity in this, I ask you? From Scandinavia to Sicily, from Ireland to Illyria, Europe has all the diversity it needs. And so do the rest of us!

The Glories of the West: Scots Highlanders! Royal Regiment of Scotland

After [duty as] the Queen’s honour guard outside Balmoral Castle & Estate this week, the guard from Balaklava Company, the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, led by The Highlanders – 4 SCOTS Pipes & Drums, both of The Royal Regiment of Scotland, return to barracks through Ballater in Royal Deeside.

Glories of the West: Music Of Cathedrals and Monasteries – Plainsong & Gregorian Chant

Three hours of what is to my mind the most glorious and holy form of sacred music ever composed: the Gregorian chant, other forms of plainsong, and medieval motets of the Age of Faith, when European Christendom was at its height, and maintained an essential unity which transcended the often bitter and violent bickering of rival kingdoms. The “Peace of God” in musical form!


If three hours of this celestial music is not enough for you, here is another excellent assortment, by the Tudor Consort:

Note that many of these are not in fact Gregorian chants, but polyphony. They are, nonetheless, both beautiful and holy – although not, to my mind, possessed of the simple and profound purity of true plainsong, particularly in the Gregorian mode.

Te Deum – 5th Century Monastic Chant (Solemn)

This form of Christian chant – Gregorian chant – is, of course, of unquestionably Western provenance! As the notation on the linked YouTube page notes,

“Monks of the one of the Abbeys of the Solesmes Congregation sing this beautiful chant. The Te Deum is attributed to two Fathers and Doctors of the Church, St. Ambrose and St. Augustine, and is one the most majestic chants in the Liturgy of the Church. It is sung in traditional seminaries and monastic houses at the Divine Office and for Double feasts of the First Class, The Nativity, Easter, Corpus Christi, Epiphany, Pentecost and those which have an Octave. The solemn Te Deum is sung on all occasions of public [liturgical] rejoicing, in Traditional Catholic Churches.”

And in English translation, it is sung (or recited, in the Office of Morning Prayer) in not a few traditional Anglican churches, as well!


Nota Bene: The Abbey of Solesmes, under Dom Prosper Guéranger, was largely responsible for the rebirth and liturgical restoration of Gregorian Chant, in the 19th and early 20th centuries, and remains the mother-house of a Benedictine community to this day (with several interruptions along the way!). For more information, check out this fascinating brief account of its history, or the Abbey’s own history page.


Here is the Te Deum in traditional English translation:

Te Deum laudamus.

WE praise thee, O God; we acknowledge thee to be the Lord.
All the earth doth worship thee, the Father everlasting.
To thee all Angels cry aloud; the Heavens, and all the Powers therein;
To thee Cherubim and Seraphim continually do cry,
Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God of Sabaoth;
Heaven and earth are full of the Majesty of thy glory.
The glorious company of the Apostles praise thee.
The goodly fellowship of the Prophets praise thee.
The noble army of Martyrs praise thee.
The holy Church throughout all the world doth acknowledge thee;
The Father of an infinite Majesty;
Thine adorable, true and only Son;
Also the Holy Ghost the Comforter.

THOU art the King of Glory, O Christ.
Thou art the everlasting Son of the Father.
When thou tookest upon thee to deliver man, thou didst humble thyself to be born of a Virgin.
When thou hadst overcome the sharpness of death, thou didst open the Kingdom of Heaven to all believers.
Thou sittest at the right hand of God, in the glory of the Father.
We believe that thou shalt come to be our Judge.
We therefore pray thee, help thy servants, whom thou hast redeemed with thy precious blood.
Make them to be numbered with thy Saints, in glory everlasting.

O LORD, save thy people, and bless thine heritage.
Govern them and lift them up for ever.
Day by day we magnify thee;
And we worship thy Name ever, world without end.
Vouchsafe, O Lord, to keep us this day without sin.
O Lord, have mercy upon us, have mercy upon us.
O Lord, let thy mercy be upon us, as our trust is in thee.
O Lord, in thee have I trusted; let me never be confounded.

Here is an English-language plainsong (chant) version:

The Glories of the West: Viehscheid im Allgäu

More from those “culture-less” Europeans! A traditional celebration of transhumance, the Viehscheid (cattle drive) in Allgäu (also celebrated elsewhere in Bavaria and throughout the Alps, including Austria and Switzerland) is a centuries-old tradition that celebrates the ceremonial return of the cattle (and their herders), in the Autumn, from the mountain pastures where they have spent the summer months, grazing on the rich grass of the Alpine meadows.

Transhumance, form of semi-nomadic pastoralism, is organized around the migration of livestock (such as cattle, goats, or sheep) between mountain pastures in warm seasons and lower altitudes the rest of the year. The herd-folk, who accompany their cattle to higher elevations during the warm season, typically have permanent homes, and families, in the valleys. The return of the cattle and their herders is therefore an occasion of great celebration, both for those who have been away all summer, and those who have been anxiously awaiting their return in the valleys below!

In the Allgäu region, no less than 30,000 cows and calves spend their summer in the mountains, before being driven down into the valley with great ceremony and celebration in the Autumn. It is time when all dress in their best trachten (traditional clothing, in its original form dating to the mid-to-late 1800s, and nowadays typically worn on festive occasions), and even the cattle are bedecked with bells, flowers, and greenery to celebrate the occasion!

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