Poppy Day is cancelled by the police amid budget cuts

Campaigners have blasted forces for breaking the decades-old tradition, but senior officers say they have no choice because of Government budget cuts.

Source: Poppy Day is cancelled by the police amid budget cuts

Budget cuts??? How about they cut the budget for taking in and settling pseudo-“refugees” and economic migrants instead? Priorities, people. Priorities!!!

“Jock Bryson, 82, who runs the town’s Royal British Legion poppy appeal, said: ‘I feel disgusted that people went to war and gave their lives and now, all of a sudden, the police are saying they are not going to help us this year.’”

Shameful.

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Homing in – review of “The Story of England” by Michael Wood | Derek Turner

Source: Homing in – review of The Story of England by Michael Wood | Derek Turner

An interesting review – generally sympathetic toward, but not blind to the faults of, what sounds like an interesting book:

The Story of England – A Village and Its People Through the Whole of English History. Michael Wood, London: Penguin, 2011, 440 pp.

From Turner’s review:

“The place is Kibworth, an outwardly unremarkable assemblage of three settlements – Kibworth Beauchamp, Kibworth Harcourt, and Smeeton Westbury – nine miles southeast of Leicester. It was chosen because it is close to the geographic centre of England and because, since 1270, parts of the township have been owned by Merton College, Oxford. Centuries of busy bursars have therefore kept voluminous records on their every transaction with their outlying asset. Such completeness is rare and, when combined with other evidence, BBC money, the author’s imaginativeness, and the interested involvement of residents, allows an unusually intimate glimpse into the private life of a place inhabited continuously for at least 2,000 years. Kibworth is ’emphatically England in miniature’ – a representative locus whose triumphs and travails mirror those of the rest of the country, and which will share England’s fate, for better or worse.”

The review itself is worth a read, and I strongly suspect the book – reviewer’s caveats duly noted and accepted – is, too.

Christianity in Europe is dying out, says Russian Orthodox leader | Interface Institute

Metropolitan Hilarion has called Christians to unite in fighting the imminent death of Christianity in Europe. He also stated that Christians in the region “must keep on defending their values and heed the cries of the persecuted and suffering believers” throughout the world.

Source: Christianity in Europe is dying out, says Russian Orthodox leader | Interface Institute

Metropolitan Hilarion called for unity between and among Christians:

“Christians in Europe must strive to defend their values ​​on which the continent has been built for centuries, and listen to the lamentations and sufferings of Christians from all over the globe,” he continued.

Multiculturalism Is Splintering the West

Multiculturalism is leading to the “partition,” the separation of European societies.

Source: Multiculturalism Is Splintering the West

Anyone who claims to be surprised by this is either lying, or has had their head in the sand for years. As I have commented more than once, in this and other fora, a proper multiculturalism is a recognition of the rights of diverse peoples to pursue their own destinies within their respective historical, cultural, and geographic spheres, both honouring and preserving the distinctiveness of cultures (while allowing for trade and legitimate cultural exchange). “Multiculturalism” defined as the enforced mingling of cultures cannot be anything but divisive and damaging, especially to the “host” (imposed-upon) cultures.

In the field of ecology, one often speaks of invasive aliens: plants and animals that move (or are brought) into an area to which they are not native, and in which they often choke out the indigenous flora and fauna, ultimately leading to a decrease of diversity in the ecosystem – even though their presence may have appeared, temporarily, to increase its diversity. Examples abound, and include multiflora rose, autumn olive, Japanese stiltgrass, water hyacinth, and the infamous kudzu in the plant kingdom, and starlings, European sparrows, nutria, mute swans, and Asian carp in the animal kingdom.

Why are we not able to comprehend that this principle applies equally to human ecosystems?

Following National Anthem Protests, the NFL is No Longer the Most Popular Sport in America | Tribunist

As the controversy surrounding the national anthem protests continues to divide football fans, the NFL now has a new challenge it must come to grips with: not being country’s favorite sport. A recent poll showed that the number of people who view the league positively has dropped significantly and that shift has allowed baseball to claim the top spot.

Source: Following National Anthem Protests, the NFL is No Longer the Most Popular Sport in America | Tribunist

I have avoided dwelling on the “taking a knee” protests at American football games, with the exception of this post on October the 1st, but I thought it would be worth mentioning that these protests are indeed having an effect – just not the one intended!

As reported by the Daily Mail, a Winston Group survey [shows] that the favorable ratings for the NFL have fallen from 57 percent at the end of August to 44 percent at the end of September, marking a 13 percent shift in just one month.

The unfavorable rating for the NFL is now the highest among all of the mainstream professional leagues, coming in at 40 percent. At the end of September, baseball’s favorable rating was 65 percent.

The survey also showed that the NFL’s core fans, typically considered to be men aged 34 to 54, have started to turn on the sport, with favorable ratings dropping from 73 to 42 [a drop of nearly 30%] and unfavorable ratings rising from 19 to 47 between August and September.

This turn may reflect a number of factors, ranging from a (well-founded) distrust of the premises of these protests, to a feeling that athletes being paid millions to play a game don’t have any standing to be complaining about discrimination, to the belief that professional sports were a place to get away from politics for a while, and now that refuge has been eliminated, to the point – underscored by the picture, above – that NFL players are protesting “on the clock,” while they’re supposed to be doing their jobs.

There is, in my opinion, justification for all of these; and I suspect that for most former National Football League fans (of whose ranks I was never a member, so I can hardly be said to be “boycotting” a sport I rarely watched anyway), there are elements of all of the above playing into the dynamic.

Whatever the source, however, the effect is clear: (former) NFL fans are “voting with their feet” – and their wallets. Some teams are beginning to realize that their actions have backfired, and are beginning to backpedal. It remains to be seen if others will follow suit… and even if they do, whether NFL fans will be quick to forgive or forget.

Robert Grosseteste, Bishop of Lincoln, 1253 | For All the Saints

Robert Grosseteste, one of the outstanding English bishops of the thirteenth century, rose to preeminence in the Church from humble beginnings to distinguish himself as a scholar in all branches of study: law, medicine, languages, sciences, and theology.

Source: Robert Grosseteste, Bishop of Lincoln, 1253 | For All the Saints

Besides all this scholarly work, Grosseteste showed conspicuous energy and dedication in his work as bishop, saying “I am obligated to visit the sheep committed to me with all diligence, as Scripture prescribes.” He was indefatigable in carrying out visitations of his diocese, traveling regularly to each rural deanery, calling the clergy and laity together, preaching, confirming, and dealing with doctrinal questions.

Today is his commemoration, in the Anglican calendar.