Glories of the West: the art of Daniel Ridgeway Knight

A montage video of some of the beautiful paintings of American-born artist Daniel Ridgeway Knight. From the original post:

Paintings by American artist Daniel Ridgway Knight ( born in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania , 1839 – died in Paris,1924)

Knight was a pupil at the École des Beaux-Arts, Paris, under Gleyre, and later worked in the private studio of Meissonier. After 1872 he lived in France, having a house and studio at Poissy on the Seine.

He painted peasant women out of doors with great popular success. He earned his first major distinction in France at the Paris Salon in 1882 with his large oil on canvas Un Deuil. He would go on to be awarded the silver medal and Cross of the Legion of Honor, Exposition Universelle, Paris, 1889, was made a Knight of the Royal Order of St. Michael of Bavaria, Munich, 1893, and received the gold medal of honor from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, 1893.

 

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Glories of the West: J S Bach Cantata – ‘Wir danken dir, Gott, wir danken dir’ BWV 29

Source: J S Bach Cantata- ‘(Wir danken dir, Gott, wir danken dir)’ BWV 29- all of bach | YouTube

This, and pretty much anything else written by J.S. Bach!

The “cover photo” is a bit unfortunate; the poor woman looks like she is in pain. But the music is utterly magnificent, as might be expected!

“In honorable memory of all Confederate soldiers…” | Julian Enders

Source: Julian EndersIn Honor Of Our Southern Ancestors And Confederate Soldiers | Facebook

Glory in grey!

With everything else that has been going on, both in my own life and in the wider world, it is almost – but not quite – possible to lose sight of the fact that the assault on Southern history, heritage, culture, and iconography continues. The assault on the Confederacy – which did not end in 1865, but merely went dormant for a while, and now continues under other means – is only one front in the larger war against Western civilization, but it is an important one.

The iconography, and the example, of the Confederacy, representing brilliant and glorious resistance against a centralizing and despotic tyranny, continues to inspire and give hope to untold millions, not only in this nation but around the world. Is it any wonder that the proponents of globalism – whether corporate or governmental, or the diffuse and many-headed hydra of cultural Marxism – is determined to do all they can to stamp out that inspiration?

But they will fail. Because the spirit of the Confederacy is the spirit of human freedom, liberty, and self-determination – among the good gifts of a benevolent Creator – and though the embers of that spirit may gutter low and even appear to be smothered for a time, they cannot be wholly extinguished. And, in time, some breath of circumstance will blow upon them, and stir them back into glorious flame!

Deo Vindice!

God will vindicate!

The Confederates

Glories of the West: Gene Kelly – Roller Skates

Holy smokes! I had not seen this one. A stellar performance! I can barely stay upright on roller skates, much less tap-dance in them. A tap dancer extraordinaire. One of the true greats!

I also like how nice everyone looks: my parents’ generation: people dressed better just to step out the door (and sometimes even at home) than a lot of folks do to go to church, nowadays. If they even go, that is…

Glories of the West: Rondeau from Sinfonies de Fanfares – Suite de Symphonies – Jean-Joseph Mouret

Source: Jean-Joseph Mouret: Rondeau from Suite de Symphonies (Trumpet and Orchestra)

Best-known to those of us of a certain age as the opening theme of PBS’s wonderful “Masterpiece Theater,” this is a splendid piece of music, played in a manner well-suited to do it justice. As one commenter put it,

“I always thought of this beautiful tune as being archetypically English, but I guess I gotta give the French full credit on this one!”

 

Glories of the West: Richard Strauss – Also sprach Zarathustra, Op. 30

Also sprach Zarathustra, Op. 30 – “Thus Spoke Zarathustra” or “Thus Spake Zarathustra” – is a tone poem (also known as a symphonic poem) by Richard Strauss, composed during 1896 and inspired by Friedrich Nietzsche’s philosophical treatise of the same name.

Source: Richard Strauss – Also sprach Zarathustra, Op. 30 | YouTube

The opening to this epic composition is perhaps best known by many as the score to the opening sequence of Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey.” In a way, that’s kind of a shame, as it is more than worthy of appreciation on its own: indeed, the entire symphonic poem is. But that opening is truly epic!

N.B.: I hasten to add that I am not a Nietzschean (although honesty also compels me to admit that his assertion that “what does not kill us, makes us strong,” has helped inspire me to persevere through some very difficult times in life).

However, this is darned fine music.

Where Celtic and Nordic meet…

I have long been especially fascinated by the intersection of Celtic and Nordic traditions: two strains of the European folk that are closely related, and yet distinct – but which have mutually enriched each other (even as they have sometimes also fought each other!) for millennia.

Here is one example, vocal improvisation on a Celtic folk song, accompanied by the traditional Swedish nyckelharpa:

 

Source: https://www.facebook.com/jasinkamusic/

And interestingly enough, the young woman in question is Polish! So truly a coming-together of three streams of European tradition: Celtic, Nordic, and Slavic. Awesome!