Evening Prayer for The Sunday Next Before Advent, 2018

Evening Prayer (Vespers) for The Sunday Next Before Advent, 2018, according to The Book of Common Prayer 1928.

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Morning Prayer (with Sermon) for the Sunday Next Before Advent, 2018

The Sunday Next Before Advent: “Stir-Up” Sunday!

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Good morning, folks, and a joyous Sunday to you! For those of us who are Christians, today is the Sunday Next Before Advent (Propers follow, below): since the Church’s calendar begins on Advent Sunday, then in a sense I suppose one could think of this as the Christian “New Year’s Eve.” Although if we become intoxicated, let it be with the Holy Spirit, and not with more carnal potions! At least not this early in the day…

Today is also known as “Stir-Up Sunday,” from the opening words of the Collect for the day: “Stir up, we beseech thee, O Lord, the wills of thy faithful people…” – a most apt petition, on this last Sunday before the beginning of the season of both penitent preparation and joyous expectation that is Advent! Indeed, just as the “Gesima” Sundays in late Winter prepare us for the coming of Lent, so “Stir-Up” Sunday gives us the opportunity to prepare to keep a holy Advent.

It is also the day on which many in England (and some here in the States, if of English heritage and affections) “stir up” the traditional Christmas pudding. The lovely “Full Homely Divinity” blog recounts the matter thus: Continue reading “The Sunday Next Before Advent: “Stir-Up” Sunday!”

Teaching video: a shortened form of Evening Prayer

Welcome to my first “teaching video” – in this case, on a rubrically-correct but condensed or abbreviated form of Evening Prayer.

The rubrics of the The Book of Common Prayer 1928 permit a significant degree of reduction in the length of Evening Prayer (Vespers) while retaining its form and a lot of its contents, making it perhaps easier to fit into our often hurried, harried, and hectic early 21st century lives.

If you have the time and opportunity to say the full Office on a regular basis, more power to you! Give thanks to God for that blessing. But if you do not, here is a way to say a shortened form of the Office which is, nonetheless, fully in accord with the rubrics contained in the 1928 Prayer Book.

And here is the very interesting and informative blog post which inspired this teaching video: Evensong at Home: A New Shortened Form for Busy Families. I encourage you to check it out – especially if you found my verbal explanations confusing.

Vespers for the Second Sunday before Advent, 2018 – The Book of Common Prayer 1928

Here is the video of Vespers (Evening Prayer) for the 25th Sunday after Trinity – Second Sunday before Advent, 2018.

The Litany, or General Supplication – The Book of Common Prayer 1928

For some time I have been doing live broadcasts of Morning and Evening Prayer (and occasionally other Anglican devotions) on Facebook. For some reason (not sure whether it’s insufficient memory and processing speed, the internet connection I have available, or some other glitch), I have not been able to broadcast live recently. Consequently, I’ve had to find a way to record the videos offline and then post them. Having found it, it occurs to me that I can now post them on The Anglophilic Anglican, too!

This is the first such: a bit of a “test run.” It is The Litany, or General Supplication (also known as “The Great Litany”). from The Book of Common Prayer 1928. I hope you enjoy, and find it of benefit!

Consecration of Samuel Seabury, first Anglican Bishop in North America, 1784 | For All the Saints

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Samuel Seabury, the first Bishop in the Protestant Episcopal Church, was consecrated to the episcopate by “Non-Juring” Bishops of the Scottish Episcopal Church in 1784.

Source: Consecration of Samuel Seabury, First Anglican Bishop in North America, 1784 | For All the Saints

A most important commemoration for all American Anglicans: the consecration to the episcopate of Samuel Seabury, the first Anglican Bishop not only in the newly-minted United States, but North America! (AFIK, that includes our friends to the north in Canada, but if I am wrong about that, I’m sure someone will correct me.)

“Samuel Seabury, the first bishop in the Protestant Episcopal Church, was born in Groton, Connecticut, on the thirtieth of November 1729. After ordination in England in 1753, he was assigned to Christ Church, New Brunswick, New Jersey as a missionary for the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel…

“After the War, a number of Connecticut clergymen, meeting in secret on the twenty-fifth of March, 1783, named Seabury or Jeremiah Leaming, whoever would be willing and able, to seek episcopal consecration in England. Leaming declined, while Seabury accepted and set sail for England.

“After a year of negotiation, Seabury found it impossible to obtain episcopal orders from the Church of England because, as an American citizen, he could not swear allegiance to the Crown… Seabury then turned to the Non-Juring bishops of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and on the twenty-fourth of November 1784, in Aberdeen, he was consecrated by the bishop and the bishop coadjutor of Aberdeen and the bishop of Ross and Caithness, in the presence of a number of clergy and laity.”
Continue reading “Consecration of Samuel Seabury, first Anglican Bishop in North America, 1784 | For All the Saints”