‘We’ll meet again’ – Queen recalls WWII song in bid to lift nation in lockdown | UK News | Sky News

Source: ‘We’ll meet again’ – Queen recalls WWII song in bid to lift nation in lockdown | UK News | Sky News

The Queen’s address to the nation, the Commonwealth, and the world!

Her Majesty has outdone herself, yet again. In only the 5th such address in the 68 years of her reign, Queen Elizabeth II speaks with her characteristic mix of absolute graciousness, steely determination, and lifelong devotion to her people and her duty. As Sky News reports,

“The Queen has drawn on her experience of wartime spirit to call on the country to ‘remain united and resolute’ to overcome the coronavirus crisis. In an historic address to the nation recorded inside Windsor Castle, the monarch said: ‘Together we are tackling this disease and I want to reassure you that if we remain united and resolute, then we will overcome it.’

“In a deeply moving and personal message, Her Majesty reflected on how difficult it is for many spending time apart during the coronavirus pandemic. ‘We should take comfort that while we may have more still to endure, better days will return: we will be with our friends again; we will be with our families again; we will meet again,’ she said…

“‘While we have faced challenges before, this one is different. This time we join with all nations across the globe in a common endeavour, using the great advances of science and our instinctive compassion to heal. We will succeed – and that success will belong to every one of us.'”

Her Majesty is, as always, an inspiration. God save The Queen!


UPDATE: Reports are that Britons have “flocked to Twitter” to express their support of Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, following her extraordinary address.

Screenshot_2020-04-05 Queen praised by Britons as monarch issues moving coronavirus rallying call - REACTION

The Express noted that Her Majesty “provided a deeply personal address as the UK desperately fights the accelerating coronavirus outbreak,” as she asserted that “those who come after us will say that the Britons of this generation were as strong as any,” and “that the attributes of self-discipline, of quiet, good-humoured resolve and of fellow feeling still characterise this country.”

“The monarch acknowledged the ‘grief’ some have experienced, the ‘financial difficulties’ many face, and the ‘enormous changes’ the country is enduring during the current nationwide lockdown to tackle the spread of coronavirus. She added in the future everyone will be able to feel ‘pride’ in how they rose to the challenge.”

I say again: God save The Queen! God bless Her Majesty, and keep her in health and safety.

 

His Royal Highness, Charles, Prince of Wales, with a compassionate and encouraging message at this time of coronavirus.

As most watchers will know, HRH The Prince of Wales has recently recovered from what was fortunately a mild case of COVID-19, himself, so he is presumably especially empathetic to others suffering, or with anxiety because of, this pandemic. May God preserve Her Majesty and all members of the Royal Family. God save The Queen!

 

Her Majesty The Queen will address the UK and Commonwealth on Sunday

Screenshot_2020-04-03 (7) The Royal Family - Posts

“On Sunday 5th April at 8pm (BST)‬ [3:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time] ‪Her Majesty The Queen will address the UK and the Commonwealth in a televised broadcast.‬ As well as television and radio, The Queen’s address will be shown on The Royal Family’s social media channels.”

One presumes that this will be in regard to the ongoing coronavirus situation. It is sad that Her Majesty has had to deal with so many crises and controversies in recent years, and now this. She’s 93 years old, for goodness sake! But as the comment above aptly noted, she is an inspiration to us all. God save The Queen! Health and long life to Her Majesty.

 

Announcement regarding changes to The Queen’s diary | The Royal Family

The British Monarchy

As a sensible precaution and for practical reasons in the current circumstances, a number of changes are being made to The Queen’s diary.

Source: Announcement regarding changes to The Queen’s diary | The Royal Family

As the saying goes, “things are getting real.” Her Majesty’s schedule is being rearranged in a manner suitable to precautions regarding the global coronavirus pandemic. Praying for the preservation in good health of Her Majesty, Prince Philip, and the rest of the Royal Family, as well as all the people of Britain and the United Kingdom. Indeed, all the people of the world!

A Prayer “In the time of any common Plague or Sickness,” from The Book of Common Prayer 1662:

O ALMIGHTY God, who in thy wrath did send a plague upon thine own people in the wilderness, for their obstinate rebellion against Moses and Aaron; and also, in the time of king David, didst slay with the plague of Pestilence threescore and ten thousand, and yet remembering thy mercy didst save the rest; Have pity upon us miserable sinners, who now are visited with great sickness and mortality; that like as thou didst then accept of an atonement, and didst command the destroying Angel to cease from punishing, so it may now please thee to withdraw from us this plague and grievous sickness; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

The English Cream Tea Company: The Etiquette of Afternoon Tea

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Source: The English Cream Tea Company. Etiquette

One could hardly call oneself an Anglophilic Anglican – much less “THE” Anglophilic Anglican! – without holding the classic English tea (the meal, not merely the beverage) in great respect and appreciation. Ranging from a light snack to a fairly substantial meal, “tea” can mean a number of different things!

Contrary to the expectations of us former Colonials on this side of the Pond, what many of us would think of as “high tea” is nothing of the sort. “High” vs “low” tea has nothing to do with levels of aristocratic sophistication, but rather the height of the table: “high tea” is the traditional evening meal of the laboring class, featuring meat pies and other such substantial fare, eaten between 5 o’clock and 7 o’clock at a high table (think dining room or – more likely for workers – kitchen) after arriving home from work.

What we often (and erroneously) think of as “high tea” is actually low tea – also known as “afternoon tea” – so named because it is taken at a low table surrounded by comfy chairs and sofas in the drawing room. It was and is served around four o’clock, to tide one over between lunch (originally, in upper-crust England, a mid-morning meal closer to our brunch) and a late dinner, around 8 o’clock.

A “full tea” is an afternoon (low) tea of three courses: the first savory (typically tea sandwiches, also known as finger sandwiches, and sometimes also including other savories such as quiche or soup), the second comprising scones with jam and cream, and the final sweet pastries and/or other confections.

Illustration depicting the difference between the different types of tea service

But the simplest form is a “cream tea,” consisting of – as one might expect – merely the scones, with clotted cream and jam, lemon curd, or similar, and of course, tea. It is this meal with which the linked Etiquette page, including a very enjoyable video, is concerned, for there is a definite etiquette involved. Yet, as Jane Malyon, of The English Cream Tea Company, points out, “Etiquette is not about putting on airs and graces and pretending to be posh! It’s actually all about consideration.” Indeed!

For additional information on the fascinating subject of the English tea, check out “How is High Tea Different from Afternoon Tea? Deciphering British Tea Time” and “What Is the Difference Between Afternoon Tea and High Tea? How history shaped the British afternoon and high tea traditions,” at The Spruce Eats.

There is also a Cream Tea Society, whose website notes that National Cream Tea Day (in Britain) is the 26th of June this year (2020). Alena Kate Petitt of The Darling Academy also comments on this day, here. And if you’re looking for ideas for a full, as opposed to a simple cream, tea, you might also want to check out these “Recipes for a Complete Afternoon Tea Menu.” For general information on British meals, see “The Different Meals and Mealtimes in Britain,” at the same site. And enjoy your tea!

 

The Moggcast Returns: “Wash your hands for one verse of the National Anthem” – “we can all play our part” against Coronavirus. | Conservative Home

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Jacob Rees-Mogg, MP for North East Somerset in the British Parliament, currently serving as Leader of the House of Commons and Lord President of the Council, and a noted conservative voice in Britain, gives his views on a number of issues, including preventing the spread of coronavirus.

Source: The Moggcast Returns. “Wash your hands for one verse of the National Anthem” – “we can all play our part” against Coronavirus. | Conservative Home

I joke that Jacob Rees-Mogg is my “spirit animal.” I like the man very much: his style, his wit and intelligence, his dry and often self-deprecating sense of humour. He is a classic Brit of the old school, both thoroughly entertaining and highly informative to listen to; and this “Moggcast,” the first such fortnightly podcast since the dramatic British elections last Autumn, is no exception to that rule!

Among his comments is the common-sense advice, in helping to prevent the spread of the coronavirus (Covid-19, which, sadly, is approaching pandemic status, if indeed it is not already there): to use a tissue when coughing or sneezing, “and toss it in the bin” after, and to wash one’s hands for the length of time it takes to sing one verse of the (British) National Anthem.

(Washing one’s hands with soap, and doing so for a sufficient length of time – 20-30 seconds – can actually kill the virus, which is surrounded by a layer of fatty tissue, which soap dissolves.)

He does suggest that one does so “quietly… otherwise I think gentlemen’s toilets might get a bit noisy.” A fine example of that wry sense of humour I mentioned above! In any case, that advice sparked several comments, of which my favorite (only very lightly edited) was

God save our gracious Queen,
Let’s keep our pawses clean,
God save the Queen!
Rub rub rub rub rub rub,
Scrub scrub scrub scrub scrub scrub,
Wash hands, you dirty grub!
God save the Queen!

I do love it.

Indeed, I think this may become my standard hand-washing theme song!

And after Her Majesty, The Queen, may God bless Jacob Rees Mogg! He’s young enough that he may yet be Prime Minister one day. I hope he is, and that I live to see it!

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Some reasons to read Beowulf | The Wordhoard

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“Here are just a few reasons why you might want to read Beowulf.”

Source: Some reasons to read Beowulf | The Wordhoard

There are many reasons you may wish to read Beowulf, the classic Old English epic – which has, of course, been translated into modern English many times. Among the reasons cited by this blogger:

“First, it is a famous example of literature from the Early Middle Ages. Second, it represents English-language literature in its infancy. Third, it has had impacted modern literature since its rediscovery.”

All true, of course! But I am convinced that the best reason is that it’s a rousing good story, created, recited, and later written and read, by and for our forebears – at least, the ancestors of those of us who are of English heritage, by blood, language and culture!

Here is a modern-English translation, and one that grasps the rhythms and richness of the great original. And here is a recitation of the opening stanzas, in the original language:

I like this one, because it’s set up in such a way that one can follow along in both Anglo-Saxon (Old English) and modern English!