March for Life: Amazing Turnout and Resolve to Stop Abortion | TFP Student Action

Source: March for Life: Amazing Turnout and Resolve to Stop Abortion | TFP Student Action

I occupy what I suppose some might consider a “moderate” position on the abortion issue, in that I believe abortion should be safe (to protect the life and health of women, in the event that it is medically necessary – and yes, that does occur, at times), legal (to ensure that it is safe), and rare (because the taking of a human life should always be a last resort, never ever a first option – and abortion should never be considered a form of birth control). I am resolutely opposed to the reprehensible calls by those on the extreme left for abortion “on demand, without apology” – and expecting the government (and thus, the taxpayers) to fund it.

On the subject of “my body, my choice” – frequently touted by those advocating the pro-abortion position – this is obviously false on its face: a fetus may depend on the woman’s body for its survival, prior to a certain stage of gestation, but from the moment of conception it is clearly a distinct individual, having its own individual genetic makeup (combining genes from both parents), and its own distinct, individual development.

“My body”? As one recent photo of a pro-life poster (which I wish I could find; I apparently failed to save it) put the matter, “since when do we think a woman has four legs, four arms, two heads, two hearts, and two different sets of genes?” It is not (just) a woman’s body; and therefore her sovereignty over it is a shared sovereignty: shared with the father of the child, and with the unborn child itself, who from the moment of conception is a child not only of his or her human parents, but a child of God.

Therefore it is with encouragement and optimism that I greet reports that the March for Life in Washington, DC, which occurred on Friday (18 January 2019) was reportedly the largest to date, with a turnout that may have been as high as 300,000 – many, if not most, of these being young people. Those on the Left who think that time is on their side, that all they have to do is wait for all the “old fogeys” to die off, may be unpleasantly surprised by the conservatism of the rising generation!

These young people have seen the failures and consequences of the “Me Generation,” and of the failed political and social experiments of the Left since the 1960s, and in many cases, want none of it. Indeed, it seems that we are seeing the beginning of a serious and growing backlash… thanks be to God.

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The Vocation of Motherhood… and Fatherhood, too.

The text that goes with this picture is a bit hard to make out, so here it is:

“Remember motherhood was God’s plan for women, not men. We all forget that motherhood is the norm and a career is abnormal. Some are compromising and urging our good high school girls to colleges and careers. Mother Teresa’s words are so enduring to our times when she said that, ‘God calls us to be faithful, not successful.’ Anyone who wishes to debate Mother’s words should pray to God for grace and insight to understand these words of wisdom. These words are especially true for the mothers of our day and time. Many mothers are so wrapped up in the ‘media success’ of these times that they see nothing wrong with going out to work. Very few mothers ‘have’ to work outside the home and it is to the detriment of family life.”

—Rosie Gil

As I wrote in response to this at the time, I agree – but I also think we sometimes forget that it was God’s plan for fathers to be at or near home most of the time, too, unless they were on a journey for the benefit of the family, or fighting to protect it.

Whether farmers – as were the majority of people until quite recently in human history – tradesmen, or merchants (the latter two of which usually had their shops or offices downstairs, with the family residence upstairs), most men spent most of their time in relatively close proximity to, and often / usually working together with, the rest of their family, right up until the Industrial Revolution.

I am not trying to detract in any way from the vital role and vocation of motherhood, or the desirability of mothers being able to devote themselves full-time to that vocation, if at all possible, and to the closely allied one of homemaking – literally, creating a home that is worthy of a family to live in.

I am simply pointing out that I believe God’s original plan was for families to be organic, integrated units of relationship, with all members working together for the common good, and supporting one another in daily living – not mom and kids at home, and dad working somewhere else, a long commute away, and only seeing them in the evening and on weekends.

The 1950s, as idyllic a time as it was in some (though not all) respects, was neither the norm nor the ideal, either – nor, certainly, were the “dark, satanic mills” of the Industrial Revolution. We have fallen a long way from the original plan, imho, in many respects!

QOTD: “We want a Europe based on its three hills…”

“We want a Europe based on its three hills: Acropolis, Capitolium and Golgotha. Hellenism, Rome and Christianity. An alliance of sovereign states against foreign enemies, terrorism and illegal emigration, with low taxes, rebirth of national production and motives to families to make more children.”

— Failos Kranidiotis, of the Greek nationalist and populist party Nea Dexia (the New Right)

Source: New patriotic Greek party wants higher birth rates and to protect Europe from Islamic colonisation – Interview

Globalism (which has both a sociopolitical and a corporate element) and cultural Marxism are strong, and firmly entrenched in the political, social, and academic elites of the West. The “long march through the institutions” has been, in many ways, all too dismayingly successful. But now, at long last, there is a real push-back.

People are beginning to see that, in the memorable image of Hans Christian Andersen’s story, “the Emperor has no clothes.” Or perhaps one should say, if the globalist / cultural Marxist “emperor” does have clothes, they include the jackboots of totalitarianism!

In any case, nationalist and populist sentiment is growing, and political parties with a nationalist and populist orientation are either springing up (like Nea Dexia) or finding new inspiration and expression (like the French Rassemblement National) with increasing vigour. Popular movements such as the Gilets Jaunes (Yellow Vests) are another manifestation of the same trend.

It’s as if the antibodies in the blood of the West have finally detected and begun to react against the disease that has been afflicting it for so long! Those of us who have been watching with both sorrow and anger the agony of the West’s long self-immolation find this a refreshing and hopeful development, and one inspiring cautious optimism.

And I find this motif of the “three hills” of Europe to be a powerful image. Granted, one of them (Golgotha) is not actually in Europe! But anyone who doubts the impact of Christianity on the development of Europe, and its right to be include as one of the core pillars of what was, after all, known as “Christian Europe,” or “Western Christendom,” is simply not paying attention.

It has long been understood – and only quite recently come into question, by those who seek to disassemble the West entirely – that Classical Greece, Ancient Rome, and Christianity are the three pillars or wellsprings of traditional Western culture. The philosophy, art, and literature of Greece, the legal, administrative, and military ability of Rome (and the political insights of both), and the spiritual, moral, and social teachings of Christianity have, between them, defined the West for millennia.

Remove any of the three, and we are left with something less that EVROPA.

Without wishing in any way to minimize the important (indeed, vital) contributions of my own Celtic and Germanic forebears, Europe – and thus, the West! – stands or falls on the Three Hills. It is on them that we must form our shield-walls, and from them that we shall begin the Reconquest of our culture and heritage from those who seek to destroy it.

The Son Rises in the West: France & the Resurrection of the Faith | The Imaginative Conservative

Notre Dame

“Christianity has died many times and risen again; for it has a God who knew the way out of the grave.”

— G.K.Chesterton, The Everlasting Man

Source: The Son Rises in the West: France & the Resurrection of the Faith ~ The Imaginative Conservative

Vive la France!

Christus regnat et imperat!

The gates of Hell shall not prevail against Christ’s Body, the Church; certainly the gates of secularism shall not. And France was pretty far gone: if she is reviving, there is hope for the West, generally!

Read, and be encouraged…!

The Epiphany of Our Lord | For All the Saints

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The Epiphany of Our Lord: The Manifestation of Christ to the Gentiles.

Source: The Epiphany of Our Lord | For All the Saints

Today is one of the high feasts of the Church year, and the “last act,” so to speak, of the Nativity Cycle. Christmastide, proper, ended last night on Twelfth Night; today begins Epiphanytide, the significance of which is explained below:

“The name of this Feast of our Lord is derived from a Greek word meaning manifestation or appearing. Historically, Anglican Prayer Books have interpreted the name with a subtitle, ‘The Manifestation of Christ to the Gentiles.’ The last phrase is, of course, a reference to the narrative of the Wise Men, the Magi, who appeared in Judaea from the East in order to worship the newborn King of the Jews.”

In the Western Church, including the Anglican tradition, the Wise Men are the major focus of this feast, and its accompanying season. But in the larger Christian tradition, Epiphany has a three-fold emphasis, and celebrates not only the visit of the Magi, but also Christ’s baptism by John the Baptist in the River Jordan, and his miracle at the Wedding in Cana, when he turned water into wine:

No photo description available.

The Wise Men – who very likely were indeed Persian Magi – are sometimes referred to as “the Three Sacred Kings” (“Los Tres Santos Reyes,” in Spanish-speaking countries, where this is a very important feast), as in the favorite carol, “We Three Kings of Orient Are.” Neither their countries of origin or their number are known for certain; these were not details the Gospel writers thought important enough to record.

But they are typically portrayed as being three in number, and often of different ethnicities, to reflect the fact that Christ came for all peoples and all nations. Kings or Magi, three or many, and wherever they originated, these somewhat mysterious figures are witnesses that Christ’s birth was of universal, not merely local, significance. For which we should rejoice!

Here is the Biblical account:

“When Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judæa, in the days of Herod the king, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem, saying, Where is he that is born King of the Jews? for we have seen his star in the east, and are come to worship him… When they had heard the king, they departed; and, lo, the star, which they saw in the east, went before them, till it came and stood over where the young child was. When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy. And when they were come into the house, they saw the young child with Mary his mother, and fell down, and worshipped him: and when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto him gifts; gold, and frankincense, and myrrh.”

— Matthew 2:1-2, 9-11 (KJV)

May everyone who reads this enjoy a holy and blessed Feast of the Epiphany, and an equally blessed Epiphanytide!

Epiphany Chalking of the Doors | The Homely Hours

The chalking of the Door is typically done on January 6th on the Feast of the Epiphany and celebrates the revealing of Christ to the world in three events…

Source: Epiphany Chalking of the Doors | The Homely Hours

From the excellent blog, “The Homely Hours” – a traditional family liturgy performed upon the Feast of the Epiphany:

“This short liturgy is a way of yearly marking our homes, usually at the front or main entrance, with sacred signs and symbols to intentionally set our homes apart as places of Christian hospitality, as safe and peaceful outposts of the Kingdom of God in the world, as habitations of healing and rest. We again invite God’s presence into our homes and ask His blessing upon all those who live, work, or visit throughout the coming year.”

“C+M+B” has a dual significance: it represents the names of the Three Wise Men (Magi, or Sacred Kings), as traditionally named by the Church: Caspar, Melchior, and Balthasar; and it also stands for Christus Mansionem Benedicat, Latin for “Christ, this house Bless.” It is flanked by the numbers representing the year: this year, it would read

20 + C + M + B + 19

Please follow the link for more!

How America helped revive the Boar’s Head feast | Catholic Herald

https://anglophilicanglican.files.wordpress.com/2018/12/Screen-Shot-2018-12-17-at-10.55.45.jpg?w=840

“Yet as with Christmas itself, Anglo-Catholicism and a great many other good things, Romanticism opened up the early 19th century to a rebirth of the Boar’s Head…”

Source: How America helped revive the Boar’s Head feast | Catholic Herald

“The boar’s head, as I understand,
Is the rarest dish in all the land…”

But not so rare, it seems, as it once was!

“Despite the cosmopolitan origins of so much of our distinctly American manner of celebrating Our Lord’s birth, in the popular mind… England is seen as the Christmas country par excellence. And among its customs that we try to emulate – in addition to the aforementioned carols services and the yule log – is the Boar’s Head Festival…

“The late 19th and early 20th centuries in the US saw an explosion of Anglophilia among the ‘better classes’… In this atmosphere, Dr Edward Dudley Tibbits, an Episcopal priest, brought the Boar’s Head tradition in 1892 to the Hoosac School in upstate New York, which he had founded three years previously.”

It was picked up by a number of Episcopal churches and cathedrals, and from thence has spread: “it can now be found at Lutheran, Methodist, Congregational and Presbyterian churches as well… In recent years, it has finally come to a few Catholic churches too.”

I have tended to think of the Boar’s Head Feast as a Twelfth Night (Eve of the Epiphany) custom; but in fact it was not, of old, limited to that occasion. As this article notes, “In medieval England, a highly decorated boar’s head was a centrepiece of Yuletide feasting in abbeys and great halls alike,” although it is true that “it is usually offered during the Twelve Days after Christmas, and so helps emphasise that magical liturgical period between Christmas and Epiphany.”

Like many ancient customs, it may also – as the article again notes – serve as a useful means of evangelization! Such an event may attract those who would be unlikely to darken the doors of a church, under other conditions. And in a jaded, secular, and gloomily (or sometime manically) self-referential age, ancient customs and traditions hold a good deal of appeal, for many, and this trend seems only likely to increase.

And if the seemingly secular jollity points to higher, sacred truths – as the Boar’s Head Feast points to Christmas, and thus, the Incarnation of God’s Incarnate Word in the Person of His Son our Saviour, Jesus Christ – so much the better! For, after all:

“Our steward hath provided this,
In honour of the King of Bliss…

Caput apri defero,
Reddens laudes Domino!”

(“The boar’s head I bear, giving praises to the Lord!”)

Deo gratias!