“It’s Time to Let Classical Music Die” | NewMusicBox

This is what we’re up against, folks!

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“There comes a point in some abusive relationships where the victim wakes up out of their Stockholm syndrome and learns that they need to plan an escape. My fellow musicians of color: it is time to accept that we are in an abusive relationship with classical music.”

Source: It’s Time to Let Classical Music Die | NewMusicBox

 

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Glories of the West: J S Bach Cantata – ‘Wir danken dir, Gott, wir danken dir’ BWV 29

Source: J S Bach Cantata- ‘(Wir danken dir, Gott, wir danken dir)’ BWV 29- all of bach | YouTube

This, and pretty much anything else written by J.S. Bach!

The “cover photo” is a bit unfortunate; the poor woman looks like she is in pain. But the music is utterly magnificent, as might be expected!

Glories of the West: Rondeau from Sinfonies de Fanfares – Suite de Symphonies – Jean-Joseph Mouret

Source: Jean-Joseph Mouret: Rondeau from Suite de Symphonies (Trumpet and Orchestra)

Best-known to those of us of a certain age as the opening theme of PBS’s wonderful “Masterpiece Theater,” this is a splendid piece of music, played in a manner well-suited to do it justice. As one commenter put it,

“I always thought of this beautiful tune as being archetypically English, but I guess I gotta give the French full credit on this one!”

 

Glories of the West: Richard Strauss – Also sprach Zarathustra, Op. 30

Also sprach Zarathustra, Op. 30 – “Thus Spoke Zarathustra” or “Thus Spake Zarathustra” – is a tone poem (also known as a symphonic poem) by Richard Strauss, composed during 1896 and inspired by Friedrich Nietzsche’s philosophical treatise of the same name.

Source: Richard Strauss – Also sprach Zarathustra, Op. 30 | YouTube

The opening to this epic composition is perhaps best known by many as the score to the opening sequence of Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey.” In a way, that’s kind of a shame, as it is more than worthy of appreciation on its own: indeed, the entire symphonic poem is. But that opening is truly epic!

N.B.: I hasten to add that I am not a Nietzschean (although honesty also compels me to admit that his assertion that “what does not kill us, makes us strong,” has helped inspire me to persevere through some very difficult times in life).

However, this is darned fine music.

Glories of the West: Beethoven – Concerto for Violin and Orchestra (Hilary Hahn, violin)

More of the culture that “Europeans don’t have”….!