Tony Esolen on sexual hedonism

“The sexual equivalent to the rejection of culture is a crass and mechanistic hedonism, seeking the pleasure of the day for its own sake… So one body preys upon another, and the last thing in the mind of either “partner” – note the business term – is that what they are doing should partake of time long past and time to come. The man is planting seed that contains within itself unnumbered generations, and the woman bears the egg, the haven for that seed, to be penetrated by it and fertilized, so that what begins from that moment is a new human life, a new instantiation of the divine image, a new dweller in time, oriented to eternity. That is in fact what is happening, but the hedonist denies it. He says that the child-making thing is not for making children.”

— Dr. Anthony Esolen, professor of English Renaissance and classical literature at Thomas More College of Liberal Arts, in Nostalgia: Going Home in a Homeless World

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QOTD: The difference between a terrorist and a warrior

“That is how you tell the difference between a terrorist and a warrior. A warrior makes themselves a human shield to protect the innocent. A terrorist uses the innocent as a human shield to protect themselves.”

— Mark Balzer (prior service, US Navy)

QOTD: Globalism and insecurity

“Cornell sociologist Mabel Berezin has identified… three insecurities inherent in globalized dynamics. Berezin notes that the nation-state historically promised to provide secure borders, a stable economy, and the space for celebration and perpetuation of a population’s customs, traditions, and religion. But as Berezin observes, these three securities have eroded as the result of dynamics in globalization.”

Stephen R. Turley, PhD: The Triumph of Tradition: How the Resurgence of Religion is Reawakening A Conservative World

“Eroded” is perhaps a gentle word, under the circumstances! As Turley points out in this excellent little volume (available via the Amazon.com link above, or as an e-book download directly from his site – I get no kickbacks from either), all three of these securities – border (e.g., territorial integrity and national sovereignty), economic, and cultural – are under sustained and aggressive attack from the forces of globalism.

While no one really likes to think in these terms, we are in a cultural and civilizational conflict, a low-grade, “soft” war which will prove to be – as Turley comments in some of his videos – as significant and far-reaching in its implications as the Cold War… perhaps even more so, as it has the potential (already partly realized) to radically reshape not only the political and economic, but the cultural and demographic map of the globe.

The Leftist media, and its allied academics and politicians, like to characterize those of us who are not only skeptical of, but downright opposed to, this “brave new world” as racists, xenophobes, bigots who blindly cling to the past rather than embrace the (so they believe, inevitable) future. In truth, it is they who are blind.

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The current situation in the West – including the United States – reminds me of nothing so much as an old Fur Trade-era freight canoe hurtling toward the precipice of Niagara Falls, with the steersman shouting “Keep paddling! What’s wrong? Don’t you want to embrace the future?” Those of us who would prefer survival are digging in our paddles, and striving to back and turn the canoe, before we reach the brink.

God grant us success!

QOTD: “Non scholae, sed vitae”

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Full form:

Non scholæ sed vitæ discendum est.

“We must learn not for school, but for life.”

— Latin proverb (paraphrase of Seneca)

 

Chesterton: Education, the soul of society

Chesterton – Education, the soul of society

One of the great failings – indeed, bitter tragedies – of our present age is that today’s education is not passing on the soul of society from one generation to another, but rather bludgeoning it to death, or at least, into unrecognizability.

Life with blood and sap in it!

This, from Timothy Jones at his “Old World Swine” blog:

Life in Christ means *real* life… with what C.S. Lewis called “some blood and sap in it.” Not the negation of desire (as the Buddha proclaimed), but the fulfillment of every true and eternal desire of the human spirit.

Every false desire is simply one of these true desires twisted back on itself. The Gospel does not kill desire, but untwists our desires to make them straight and true again (“true” in this sense like a well-planed board, or the path of a well-crafted arrow), so that we may follow them to their source… the creator God, One in Three.

Amen, and amen!