‘We’ll meet again’ – Queen recalls WWII song in bid to lift nation in lockdown | UK News | Sky News

Source: ‘We’ll meet again’ – Queen recalls WWII song in bid to lift nation in lockdown | UK News | Sky News

The Queen’s address to the nation, the Commonwealth, and the world!

Her Majesty has outdone herself, yet again. In only the 5th such address in the 68 years of her reign, Queen Elizabeth II speaks with her characteristic mix of absolute graciousness, steely determination, and lifelong devotion to her people and her duty. As Sky News reports,

“The Queen has drawn on her experience of wartime spirit to call on the country to ‘remain united and resolute’ to overcome the coronavirus crisis. In an historic address to the nation recorded inside Windsor Castle, the monarch said: ‘Together we are tackling this disease and I want to reassure you that if we remain united and resolute, then we will overcome it.’

“In a deeply moving and personal message, Her Majesty reflected on how difficult it is for many spending time apart during the coronavirus pandemic. ‘We should take comfort that while we may have more still to endure, better days will return: we will be with our friends again; we will be with our families again; we will meet again,’ she said…

“‘While we have faced challenges before, this one is different. This time we join with all nations across the globe in a common endeavour, using the great advances of science and our instinctive compassion to heal. We will succeed – and that success will belong to every one of us.'”

Her Majesty is, as always, an inspiration. God save The Queen!


UPDATE: Reports are that Britons have “flocked to Twitter” to express their support of Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, following her extraordinary address.

Screenshot_2020-04-05 Queen praised by Britons as monarch issues moving coronavirus rallying call - REACTION

The Express noted that Her Majesty “provided a deeply personal address as the UK desperately fights the accelerating coronavirus outbreak,” as she asserted that “those who come after us will say that the Britons of this generation were as strong as any,” and “that the attributes of self-discipline, of quiet, good-humoured resolve and of fellow feeling still characterise this country.”

“The monarch acknowledged the ‘grief’ some have experienced, the ‘financial difficulties’ many face, and the ‘enormous changes’ the country is enduring during the current nationwide lockdown to tackle the spread of coronavirus. She added in the future everyone will be able to feel ‘pride’ in how they rose to the challenge.”

I say again: God save The Queen! God bless Her Majesty, and keep her in health and safety.

 

Her Majesty The Queen will address the UK and Commonwealth on Sunday

Screenshot_2020-04-03 (7) The Royal Family - Posts

“On Sunday 5th April at 8pm (BST)‬ [3:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time] ‪Her Majesty The Queen will address the UK and the Commonwealth in a televised broadcast.‬ As well as television and radio, The Queen’s address will be shown on The Royal Family’s social media channels.”

One presumes that this will be in regard to the ongoing coronavirus situation. It is sad that Her Majesty has had to deal with so many crises and controversies in recent years, and now this. She’s 93 years old, for goodness sake! But as the comment above aptly noted, she is an inspiration to us all. God save The Queen! Health and long life to Her Majesty.

 

Inside the World’s Only Surviving Tattoo Shop For Medieval Pilgrims | Atlas Obscura

The Razzouk family has been inking religious pilgrims in the Middle East for 700 years.

Source: Inside the World’s Only Surviving Tattoo Shop For Medieval Pilgrims – Atlas Obscura

I am not, as a rule, fond of tattoos – either on myself, or on others. The contemporary drive to get “inked” is one which is largely lost on me; indeed, The Anglophilic Anglican has posted previously in an attempt to discourage that urge: especially on young women, but young men as well. As I commented at the time,

“I have never really liked tattoos. That some of them can be artistically interesting is beside the point: that artistry could have been expressed in a different medium. And I especially don’t care for them on girls and young women – or women in general, for that matter. Now, I’m not necessarily opposed to a small, tasteful, and discretely-placed tattoo on a woman. But anything more reminds me, frankly, of someone spray-painting graffiti all over the Sistine Chapel.”

But I am no longer a young man, and every rule has its exception. This might well be one, should I ever – by God’s grace – be fortunate enough to make it to the Holy Land. Although done in modern fashion for reasons of health and safety, the history, tradition, symbolism, and heritage expressed here is worlds away from the tattoo parlor down the street inking you with your favorite band, an ostensibly “tribal” design from who-knows-what tribe, or even the name of your girlfriend:

“For 700 years the Razzouk family has been tattooing marks of faith. Coptic Christians who settled in Jerusalem four generations ago, the family had learned the craft of tattooing in Egypt, where the devout wear similar inscriptions. Evidence of such tattoos dates back at least as far as the 8th century in Egypt and the 6th century in the Holy Land, where Procopius of Gaza wrote of tattooed Christians bearing designs of crosses and Christ’s name. Early tattoos self-identified indigenous Christians in the Middle East and Egypt. Later, as the faithful came to the Holy Land on pilgrimage, the practice expanded to offer these travelers permanent evidence of their devotion and peregrination…

“Family lore dates the Razzouk’s involvement in this cultural practice to 1300, starting first in Egypt among Coptic (Orthodox) Christians and later in the Holy Land for Christians from a variety of backgrounds… [Pilgrims’ accounts dating to the late 16th century] report designs that have become enduring pilgrimage tattoos, such as the Jerusalem cross—a motif consisting of a central, equal-arm symbol flanked by four smaller versions—along with images of Christ, Latin mottoes, dates in banners, and more.”

I have not changed my generalized views on tattooing, as expressed in that earlier post. But every rule has its exception; and if, as I say, by God’s grace I am ever able to make a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, this may be the one exception to my personal “no tattoos” rule. A family which has been engaged in the practice for 700 years, since the 1300s? A direct, lineal link with medieval pilgrims, of Chaucer’s age? Using designs – and stencil blocks into which those designs have been carved – known to date back at least to 1749 (one block, for the Jerusalem cross, they say is known to date back 500 years)? Yes. I could do that.

If I did, what design would I choose? Well, I’d take a look at what was available, of course. But I have a feeling I already know: the very one pictured above: the Jerusalem pilgrim’s cross – which was also the sigil of the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem – and very likely, the “IHS,” with it. “In Hoc Signo.” In This Sign… Conquer.

Yeah.

Screenshot_2020-03-29 Since 1300 ( razzouktattoo) • Instagram photos and videos


Razzouk Tattoos has a website, of course. Everyone does, these days! Even tattooers to medieval pilgrims, with a 700 year history. Perhaps especially them!

There is also a CNN video about them:

https://www.cnn.com/2016/09/06/middleeast/jerusalem-tattoos-lee/index.html

Glories of the West: Colonial Williamsburg from Above

From Colonial Williamsburg, which comments:

We’re loving this drone footage taken by one of the administrators of our Architectural Preservation and Research Facebook group, Director Matt Webster, for everyone missing the Historic Area. He says it was a little windy, so forgive the shifts in the video! We thought a little fife and drum soundtrack would go perfectly.

I agree: it does!

 

Glories of the West: Tchaikovsky’s “Hymn of the Cherubim,” with Beautiful Christian Churches

And not merely “Glories of the West” – the Glories of Christendom! East as well as West. Beautiful music, and a remarkable assemblage of magnificent European churches, in a variety of traditional styles. Lovely!

Coronavirus and Covid-19: Nothing will be the same after this | Bjorn Andreas Bull-Hansen

Norwegian author and YouTuber Bjorn Andreas Bull-Hansen has some interesting thoughts on the long-term, cultural significance of coronavirus (COVID-19 / SARS-COV-2). The existence of this virus will definitely have effects on how we think about things, how we act, where we go, who we interact with:

“We’re going to see people understanding the value of family, we’re going to see people returning to the local communities; people will travel less, people will have a lot more skepticism toward foreigners, towards foreign cultures. I’m sure there will be a lot of push-back toward this, that people will call you a lot of names if you have that kind of skepticism” – but, he strongly implies, it’s going to happen, whether some folks like it or not.

This is starting to hit home to me. I have just learned that because Maryland has decided to cancel all school classes and programs for two weeks, starting on Monday, I am going to be taking some serious hits professionally and financially. I may lose two weeks of pay. At least. Maybe more, if things continue.

It’s definitely making me think. I am vulnerable, here. I’m vulnerable economically, since I’m dependent very much on what others do for my employment. We all are, to some degree. But I’m acutely so, by the nature of my job. I’m vulnerable health-wise, again due to the nature of my employment.

And I am vulnerable, too, in that I am living a) close to a very large and fairly unstable city – Baltimore – which has a history of rioting, and which could become very unpleasant very quickly if things get bad; and b) in a context in which it is very difficult for me to “prep” – to stockpile food and supplies, and to operate “off the grid,” if necessary. Not just difficult, but nearly impossible, at present.

I have been resisting the thought of moving – even as I have also been pondering the prospect – partly because I was “once burned, twice shy” by my 2013-14 relocation to Maine; and partly because it is simply a daunting concept. Where will I go? What will I do to make money, to support myself? I have no easy answers. But this coronavirus outbreak is definitely making me think more deeply about the questions.

Another way in which this has touched me: I stopped at the local supermarket on my way home from work today. Thought nothing of it, there were just a few things I wanted to get, some for supper, some for later. I walked into a “panic buying” situation, as the school closings had caused local people to make a run on the store. In this one incident, I now have more of a sense of what it must have been like to have lived in the Soviet Union, at least as regards empty shelves in the stores.

I ended up getting more than I had intended, just because I wasn’t sure it’d be there the next time! And this was because there has been a single “community-transmitted” case of coronavirus detected in the State of Maryland: that is to say, an individual who had no known exposure to coronavirus through travel or an infected individual, meaning the precise source was unknown.

While I am not saying that an abundance of caution is inappropriate in this case, it does make me wonder what would happen in a more dramatic emergency. And yes, this certainly does cause one – at least, this one – to hope that our contemporary reliance on global supply chains, porous borders, and “just in time” delivery models are overdue for a rethink.

Understanding the value of family, returning to the local communities, less-frequent or at least more thoughtful and less-casual travel, and more skepticism toward foreigners, all sound like pretty good ideas to me, at this point.

Bull-Hansen has more to say, too, than what I have quoted and reacted to. Definitely worth a watch, and worth considering his comments. “Stay strong,” he concludes. “We will get through this. We will all get through this.”

May God grant it.

 

Words Have Meaning | The Southern Agrarian (with some thoughts and reflections inspired thereby)

https://i1.wp.com/www.southernagrarian.com/wp-content/uploads/GentlemanDefinition_IMG_2959_1200w-640x427.jpg

gen-tle-man – noun a : a man of noble or gentle birth b : a man belonging to the landed gentry c(1) : a man who combines gentle birth or rank with chivalrous qualities (2) : a man whose conduct conforms to a high standard of propriety or correct behavior …

Source: Words Have Meaning | The Southern Agrarian

There is much that could be said about this piece, and all of it good. Read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest!

One thing for which I especially wish to thank the author, Stephen Clay McGeehee, is his mention of the absurd and dismaying irony in today’s so-called “gentlemen’s clubs.” I have long been struck by the complete divorce from reality represented by that designation. True gentlemen’s clubs, in the classic and authentic sense, are few and far between, nowadays, alas. But they once existed! And a few still do.

One superb example, which is still extant (though nowadays it has become “coed,” like so many other distinguished institutions for men) is The Cosmos Club, in Washington, DC. It was there that the National Geographic Society was founded, in 1888 – only ten years after the Club opened.

Its website, which I commend to the attention of my readers, mentions that

“Cosmos Club members have included three U.S. Presidents, two U.S. Vice Presidents, a dozen Supreme Court justices, 36 Nobel Prize winners, 61 Pulitzer Prize winners, and 55 recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.”

The “About the Cosmos Club” page includes a very interesting video on the Club’s history, to which I link here:

Even the dress code is admirable:

“Gentlemen are expected to wear jackets, dress slacks, a collared long-sleeved shirt (tucked-in) or turtleneck at all times. Ties are required only in the Garden Dining Room at Sunday brunch, and at lunch and dinner. Ties are not required anywhere else in the clubhouse.

“Ladies are expected to dress in an equivalent fashion, which means dresses, suits, skirts or dress slacks with jackets or tops of equivalent formality. Leggings or tights, unless worn with skirts, dresses, or long jackets, are not considered to be of equivalent formality.

“Military uniforms and national dress of equivalent formality are also acceptable.” [I am presuming that this includes formal Scots Highland dress!] “At black-tie events, members and guests in attendance are expected to dress appropriately for the occasion.

“Sweat suits or other athletic or sports attire, jeans or other denim garments, sneakers, flip-flops, athletic footwear and shorts are never acceptable in the public rooms.”

Amen!

Alas, I am unlikely ever to rise to a level of social distinction to be invited to membership in the Cosmos Club! But I can, and do, admire it from afar. And on a more international level, once finds such organizations as the International Order of St. Hubertus. The website of the U.S. branch notes that

“The International Order of St. Hubertus is comprised of an international group of individuals, Ordensbrothers, who are passionate about the sports of hunting and fishing, and who are vitally interested and actively involved in the preservation of wildlife, its habitat, and the tradition of ethical hunting and fishing.”

International Order of Saint Hubertus • Established Anno Domini 1695

The motto of the Order is Deum Diligite Animalia Diligentes: “Honoring God by Honoring His Creatures.” This is another one for which I regret that I will almost certainly never qualify! But once again, I respect and admire them, even though I must do so from afar.

Both of these, and the other remaining exemplars of their type, are a far cry from what is referred to as “gentlemen’s clubs,” in the common (in several sense of the word) parlance! But I have now digressed far from the central point – that words do, indeed, have meaning, and that the words we choose matter, and matter deeply – of this excellent essay, to which, once again, I commend your sympathetic attention.

As Stephen Clay McGeehee so aptly concludes,

“Perhaps we cannot stop the process of cultural Marxism as it destroys our society by changing the way people think. Perhaps it has already gone too far. We can, however, control it in our families, among our friends and associates, in our churches, and other places where we have a leadership role. Men think in words, and words have meaning. Insist that words be used correctly.”

Indeed.