“Angles at Play” – England in sport and spirituality | Crisis Magazine

 

“England is a strong land and a sturdy, and the plenteousest corner of the world… England is full of mirth and of game, and men oft-times able to mirth and game; free men of heart and with tongue.”

Source: Angles at Play – Crisis Magazine

An interesting take, from a Roman Catholic perspective, on the relationship between England’s “land of mirth and game,” and the English spirit, and spirituality – particularly as expressed in traditional faith and practice during the centuries of medieval catholicism, but continuing well into the modern era, especially in more rural (and thus, typically, traditional) areas:

“The English have a genius for play. Which other nation of Christendom has at the center of its villages not just a church but a field for sport? Along with the church and pub, the quintessential center of the English village is the cricket green…

“The origins of sport lie in the recreations and pastimes of pre-modern rural people. The agrarian and religious calendar shaped popular recreation as it did nearly every other aspect of English culture. From the land full of mirth and game, originated the primordial forms of many of the sports the world enjoys today.

“During the Middle Ages, the Church’s feast days were firmly embedded in England’s seasons of agricultural labor. Plough Monday, spring-time celebrations, harvest feasts, and autumn fairs were vital moments within the rhythm of organic English society. Robert Malcolmson notes how feast days were the occasion for festive leisure and for archaic forms of contemporary sports.

“Most of the saints’ days fostered in medieval England were tragically suppressed during the English Reformation, but many of the associated customs survived. Parish feasts (known as wakes) continued into the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries while the principal holidays—Christmas, Shrovetide, Easter, May Day, and Whitsuntide—continued to be observed despite the best efforts of the essentially urban puritan movement.”

Well worth a read!

 

His Royal Highness, Charles, Prince of Wales, with a compassionate and encouraging message at this time of coronavirus.

As most watchers will know, HRH The Prince of Wales has recently recovered from what was fortunately a mild case of COVID-19, himself, so he is presumably especially empathetic to others suffering, or with anxiety because of, this pandemic. May God preserve Her Majesty and all members of the Royal Family. God save The Queen!

 

Her Majesty The Queen will address the UK and Commonwealth on Sunday

Screenshot_2020-04-03 (7) The Royal Family - Posts

“On Sunday 5th April at 8pm (BST)‬ [3:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time] ‪Her Majesty The Queen will address the UK and the Commonwealth in a televised broadcast.‬ As well as television and radio, The Queen’s address will be shown on The Royal Family’s social media channels.”

One presumes that this will be in regard to the ongoing coronavirus situation. It is sad that Her Majesty has had to deal with so many crises and controversies in recent years, and now this. She’s 93 years old, for goodness sake! But as the comment above aptly noted, she is an inspiration to us all. God save The Queen! Health and long life to Her Majesty.

 

The English Cream Tea Company: The Etiquette of Afternoon Tea

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Source: The English Cream Tea Company. Etiquette

One could hardly call oneself an Anglophilic Anglican – much less “THE” Anglophilic Anglican! – without holding the classic English tea (the meal, not merely the beverage) in great respect and appreciation. Ranging from a light snack to a fairly substantial meal, “tea” can mean a number of different things!

Contrary to the expectations of us former Colonials on this side of the Pond, what many of us would think of as “high tea” is nothing of the sort. “High” vs “low” tea has nothing to do with levels of aristocratic sophistication, but rather the height of the table: “high tea” is the traditional evening meal of the laboring class, featuring meat pies and other such substantial fare, eaten between 5 o’clock and 7 o’clock at a high table (think dining room or – more likely for workers – kitchen) after arriving home from work.

What we often (and erroneously) think of as “high tea” is actually low tea – also known as “afternoon tea” – so named because it is taken at a low table surrounded by comfy chairs and sofas in the drawing room. It was and is served around four o’clock, to tide one over between lunch (originally, in upper-crust England, a mid-morning meal closer to our brunch) and a late dinner, around 8 o’clock.

A “full tea” is an afternoon (low) tea of three courses: the first savory (typically tea sandwiches, also known as finger sandwiches, and sometimes also including other savories such as quiche or soup), the second comprising scones with jam and cream, and the final sweet pastries and/or other confections.

Illustration depicting the difference between the different types of tea service

But the simplest form is a “cream tea,” consisting of – as one might expect – merely the scones, with clotted cream and jam, lemon curd, or similar, and of course, tea. It is this meal with which the linked Etiquette page, including a very enjoyable video, is concerned, for there is a definite etiquette involved. Yet, as Jane Malyon, of The English Cream Tea Company, points out, “Etiquette is not about putting on airs and graces and pretending to be posh! It’s actually all about consideration.” Indeed!

For additional information on the fascinating subject of the English tea, check out “How is High Tea Different from Afternoon Tea? Deciphering British Tea Time” and “What Is the Difference Between Afternoon Tea and High Tea? How history shaped the British afternoon and high tea traditions,” at The Spruce Eats.

There is also a Cream Tea Society, whose website notes that National Cream Tea Day (in Britain) is the 26th of June this year (2020). Alena Kate Petitt of The Darling Academy also comments on this day, here. And if you’re looking for ideas for a full, as opposed to a simple cream, tea, you might also want to check out these “Recipes for a Complete Afternoon Tea Menu.” For general information on British meals, see “The Different Meals and Mealtimes in Britain,” at the same site. And enjoy your tea!

 

Some reasons to read Beowulf | The Wordhoard

Image result for beginning of beowulf

“Here are just a few reasons why you might want to read Beowulf.”

Source: Some reasons to read Beowulf | The Wordhoard

There are many reasons you may wish to read Beowulf, the classic Old English epic – which has, of course, been translated into modern English many times. Among the reasons cited by this blogger:

“First, it is a famous example of literature from the Early Middle Ages. Second, it represents English-language literature in its infancy. Third, it has had impacted modern literature since its rediscovery.”

All true, of course! But I am convinced that the best reason is that it’s a rousing good story, created, recited, and later written and read, by and for our forebears – at least, the ancestors of those of us who are of English heritage, by blood, language and culture!

Here is a modern-English translation, and one that grasps the rhythms and richness of the great original. And here is a recitation of the opening stanzas, in the original language:

I like this one, because it’s set up in such a way that one can follow along in both Anglo-Saxon (Old English) and modern English!

 

Shrove Tuesday: penitence, absolution, and… pancakes!

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Pancake races are apparently a “thing” in the UK, for Shrove Tuesday  – the day before Ash Wednesday, and the start of Lent – and have been for centuries. Even clergy and choristers get into it, on occasion! Not to mention some really cute kids…

The town of Olney takes credit for their origin, as recorded on the town website:

“According to tradition it was in Olney, back in 1445, that pancake racing started. On Shrove Tuesday the church bell rang out to signal the start of the church service.

“A local housewife who was busy cooking pancakes before the start of Lent, ran to the church. She was still carrying her frying pan and wearing her apron and headscarf, and tossed the pancake to prevent it from burning.

“Local people who saw this were amused, and later started to organise pancake races. Pancake races still take place in Olney each Shrove Tuesday.”

Several of these pics are from Olney itself (a town which presumably gave its name to a town in Maryland, near where I grew up), both modern and historical; others are from elsewhere around the web… and the UK!

But of course, Shrove Tuesday (Pancake Day, Doughnut Day, Fastnacht, Mardi Gras, Fat Tuesday, etc.) is not just an excuse to eat yummy pancakes or doughnuts. It is about preparing for a holy Lent by being shriven (past participle of “shrove”) – forgiven, pardoned – for one’s duly repented sins, in preparation for the great season of self-examination, repentance, and preparation that is Lent.

 

What Princess Charlotte’s Portrait Teaches Us About Raising Adults | Intellectual Takeout

What Princess Charlotte’s Portrait Teaches Us About Raising Adults

Is it possible that in treating children like children – both in the way we dress them and the activities we allow them to pursue – we will better prepare them for a natural, responsible transition to adulthood some day in the future?

Source: What Princess Charlotte’s Portrait Teaches Us About Raising Adults | Intellectual Takeout

Annie Holmquist, Editor of Intellectual Takeout, often has good things to say, and this is no exception. This essay is a few years old, but that does not make it any less apropos. She notes a Spanish clothing designer – Spain being one country where traditional clothing for children is much more common than it is here in the US, or apparently in the UK – as commenting,

“The style is much more classic for children, with Peter Pan collar shirts, soft colours, floral prints. We keep the essence of timeless clothing for children and enjoy seeing our children look like children.”

(See also this earlier essay on the subject.)

The Anglophilic Anglican is a hopeless traditionalist – and darned proud of it! – so needless to say, I agree. But it may be more than merely an aesthetic preference. As Holmquist continues,

“I can’t help but wonder if the Royals have caught onto an idea that’s been completely overlooked by all of us commoners across the pond… after reading the ideas behind the Spanish approach to children’s dressing which the Royals follow, I had to ask myself if the American habit of dressing children as mini-mes has helped to fuel the rise of immature and incapable adults.”

Well worth a read!