The End of London, Prepare Yourself | Stefan Molyneux

Talk about your “inconvenient truth.”

This is sobering. Saddening. Angering. I loved London, when I was there in 1985 and again in 1990. (I also wanted to visit Paris some day. Not in its current state…) “When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life!” exclaimed Samuel Johnson, in 1777.  What a different 241 years make!

And of course, what is true of London (and other major cities in England, and increasingly throughout the British Isles) is true of many other places in Europe, and could rapidly become true of the United States, too, if those who support the migrant “caravans” – along with “sanctuary cities,” and similar inanities – have their way.

This video is not going to be an easy or popular one to listen to, especially for those who are still sucking at the teat of the dominant “liberal”/progressive narrative. Stefan Molyneux says things that are not going to go down easily, for some. But that does not make them wrong.

Unfortunately, he is all too right.

“Diversity is our strength.”

Bullshit.

Bullshit.

Bullshit.

Sorry, not sorry, for the language.

God damn – and I mean that quite literally, may God Almighty condemn to destruction in this life and perdition in the next – those who, in the name of an insane, twisted obsession with so-called “diversity,” are seeking to destroy the West, and its culture, history, and civilization (including, not incidentally, Christianity and the Judeo-Christian tradition). God damn them to Hell.

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By Order of the King – Rare British WW1 song | YouTube

Source: By Order of the King – Rare British WW1 song | YouTube

In light of the actual events of the Great War – the millions killed and millions more maimed by bullet and shell, or incapacitated by gas, the destruction of a whole generation in the trenches of Europe, and the host of unexpected consequences for Europe and the world – the optimism and upbeat tempo of this song is ironic, to say the least.

Even as much of an Anglophile and demi-monarchist as I am, I am not sure whether to shake my head with a rueful smile, or let the tears roll down my face. As I have commented on more than one occasion, and in more than one venue, that war should never have happened, and we are still reaping its bitter harvest to this day!

But the song is an interesting one, and catchy. I have a feeling I’m going to be humming the refrain for the rest of the day, at least…

Consecration of Samuel Seabury, first Anglican Bishop in North America, 1784 | For All the Saints

https://www.episcopalct.org/Customer-Content/www/CMS/files/Archives/Seabury_pic.jpg

Samuel Seabury, the first Bishop in the Protestant Episcopal Church, was consecrated to the episcopate by “Non-Juring” Bishops of the Scottish Episcopal Church in 1784.

Source: Consecration of Samuel Seabury, First Anglican Bishop in North America, 1784 | For All the Saints

A most important commemoration for all American Anglicans: the consecration to the episcopate of Samuel Seabury, the first Anglican Bishop not only in the newly-minted United States, but North America! (AFIK, that includes our friends to the north in Canada, but if I am wrong about that, I’m sure someone will correct me.)

“Samuel Seabury, the first bishop in the Protestant Episcopal Church, was born in Groton, Connecticut, on the thirtieth of November 1729. After ordination in England in 1753, he was assigned to Christ Church, New Brunswick, New Jersey as a missionary for the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel…

“After the War, a number of Connecticut clergymen, meeting in secret on the twenty-fifth of March, 1783, named Seabury or Jeremiah Leaming, whoever would be willing and able, to seek episcopal consecration in England. Leaming declined, while Seabury accepted and set sail for England.

“After a year of negotiation, Seabury found it impossible to obtain episcopal orders from the Church of England because, as an American citizen, he could not swear allegiance to the Crown… Seabury then turned to the Non-Juring bishops of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and on the twenty-fourth of November 1784, in Aberdeen, he was consecrated by the bishop and the bishop coadjutor of Aberdeen and the bishop of Ross and Caithness, in the presence of a number of clergy and laity.”
Continue reading “Consecration of Samuel Seabury, first Anglican Bishop in North America, 1784 | For All the Saints”

Why Prince Charles Is Laying a Wreath For Queen Elizabeth This Morning for Remembrance Day at London’s Cenotaph

Wreaths Are Laid At The Cenotaph On Remembrance Sunday

Today, the royal family is marking the 100th anniversary of World War I.

Source: Why Prince Charles Is Laying a Wreath For Queen Elizabeth This Morning for Remembrance Day at London’s Cenotaph

“At 92, Queen Elizabeth is showing no sign of slowing down. Just last week, for example, she was spotted horseback riding on the grounds of Windsor Castle. But she has started to pass on some of her responsibilities to the younger members of her family.

“This morning, Prince Charles lay a wreath at London’s Cenotaph on his mother’s behalf during the national service of remembrance. It is the second year the Prince of Wales has performed the duty on Remembrance Day, which this year holds additional significance, as it falls on the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I.”

Queen saddened by death of her beloved corgi called Whisper | Daily Mail Online

Daniel Craig, left, was filmed escorting The Queen and her corgis to the Opening Ceremony of the London 2012 Olympics
Daniel Craig, left, was filmed escorting The Queen and her corgis to the Opening Ceremony of the London 2012 Olympics

The Queen has been left deeply saddened by the death of a corgi she adopted after the dog’s owner died. Twelve-year-old Whisper had become a royal favourite and would follow her from room to room.

Source: Queen saddened by death of her beloved corgi called Whisper | Daily Mail Online

Her Majesty is reportedly mourning the death of her last Welsh corgi – a breed long-connected with The Queen, to the point of becoming iconic: as much a part of Her Majesty’s public persona as her famous hats and handbags. Whisper died in Windsor Castle after an illness of some weeks, ending the Royal association with the breed, which dates back to her 18th birthday, in 1944, when she was given a corgi – “Susan” – by her father, King George VI.

Whisper was “inherited” after the death of his owner, Bill Fenwick, a former gamekeeper at the Royal estate of Sandringham, in 2016. His late wife Nancy was known as the “keeper of the Queen’s corgis” and took care of the royal pups when Her Majesty was away on tours. Whisper was the only corgi owned by Queen Elizabeth II that she had not raised herself, and the only one not descended from the line of Susan. He was known as a “friendly chap” who devotedly followed her from room to room.

She stopped breeding corgis five years ago, reportedly because “she feared tripping over excitable puppies,” and was “worried about who would look after them when she no longer could.” Her Majesty retains two “dorgis” – dachshund / corgi crosses – named Candy and Vulcan, and several Labradors, the latter of whom live full-time at Sandringham. The Daily Mail reports that “The death of any of her corgis has always hit her hard and Whisper’s was no different.”

Deepest sympathy to Her Majesty on the loss of her canine friend and companion!

Rules: oldest restaurant in London, serving traditional British food

Rules was established by Thomas Rule in 1798 making it the oldest restaurant in London. It serves traditional British food, specialising in classic game.

Source: Oldest restaurant in London. It serves traditional British food.

Rules restaurant, at 35 Maiden Lane, Convent Garden, London, “serves the traditional food of this country at its best – and at affordable prices. It specialises in classic game cookery, oysters, pies and puddings.” I must confess, their version of “affordable” is not exactly mine (a situation often the case here in the U.S., as well), but I would nonetheless love to go there!

The website notes,

“Rules is a heritage restaurant. There is a demand for the best in life as we are confronted with so much mediocrity. In an age when everyone is deluged with homogeneous brands, we like to create the special. There is a real unfulfilled need and desire to experience it.”

With that, I cannot disagree!

Fried Chicken In The 18th Century? 300 Year old Recipe | Townsend

An old English recipe from Nathan Bailey’s 1736 cookbook, “Dictionarium Domesticum,” courtesy of Jas. Townsend & Sons. Sounds tasty!