“For The Ladies” (and Gentlemen) | Be A Southern Gentleman

Source: Be A Southern Gentleman – For The Ladies (and Gentlemen)

Stephen Clay McGehee, a good friend of The Anglophilic Anglican, writes on his excellent blog “Be A Southern Gentleman,”

“Over the years, I have received several emails from ladies wanting tips on how and where to find a Southern gentleman. Southern gentlemen are few and far-between in today’s society, and ladies who want what marriage should be, who want a husband who will honor and cherish her and treat her like his queen, will be looking for a way to meet them. That is exactly how it should be, and those Southern gentlemen are certainly looking for those same Southern ladies. There is no magic formula to make this happen, but perhaps we can pass along a few ideas that may help.”

I am myself seeking a Southern lady – although I would be open to one from another geographic region, if she shared the same attributes and values! – and so I found this very interesting. Perhaps others may as well.

modest-yet-alluring
English actress Hermione Corfield demonstrating how it is possible to dress tastefully and still look attractive, even alluring.

Stephen sketches out general categories such as “Networking,” “Outward Appearance,” “Activities,” “Manners, Etiquette, and Lifestyle” (the first two, in particular, seeming to be almost unknown – or at least, held in little esteem – in today’s world), and includes “A few other notes.” I particularly liked his penultimate comment in this section:

“If all of this sounds too submissive or weak or ‘Goody Two Shoes’ for you, then do yourself and Southern gentlemen a favor and realize that you are not a good match. Southern gentlemen and ladies are both quite rare. There is a reason for that.”

Of equal interest (to me, anyway, being a gentleman rather than a lady) to Stephen’s original blog post is the response from a self-described “single lady” named Nancy, who describes “some of what I look for in a man, as a potential husband/partner.”

What is especially interesting to me is that among the ten characteristics she lists as being important to her, being a “ripped hunk with abs of steel,” or being a multimillionaire, do not make the list.

So what does she look for?

She does (understandably) seek someone who leads “a basically healthy lifestyle,” and who is “neat, clean, and tidy” (“Are his cloths neat? Does he wear anything beyond t-shirts and sweat pants? Are his hair, mustache, and beard neatly trimmed? Does he have good hygiene practices?”) – but assuming she is being honest in her assessment, she’s not looking for a superman or a movie star.

Instead, she seeks characteristics like “Does he have a pleasant sense of humor? Is he comfortable in his own skin? How does he treat me? Does he seem concerned about my happiness and welfare? Does he have anger issues? Is he ‘father material’?”

These, with the rest of her list, are characteristics that a young woman might profitably consider, as she seeks a man – and which a man might profitably seek to foster, if he seeks a decent, respectable, and worthy woman to be his sweetheart and eventual wife.

The Case Against Tattoos | Blue Collar Logic

This is an excellent video. The arguments are logical, reasonable, and well-expressed. And I don’t think that’s just confirmation bias, either, although I admit he and I are on the same side of this issue.

Full disclosure: I have never really liked tattoos. That some of them can be artistically interesting is beside the point: that artistry could have been expressed in a different medium. And I especially don’t care for them on girls and young women – or women in general, for that matter. Now, I’m not necessarily opposed to a small, tasteful, and discretely-placed tattoo on a woman. But anything more reminds me, frankly, of someone spray-painting graffiti all over the Sistine Chapel.

As Dave Morrison points out at the beginning of this video, if you already have the equivalent of a full-sleeve tattoo (or more), don’t bother watching. It’s too late. If you have a small rose, butterfly, faerie, etc., on your hip-line (or equivalent), and firmly intend to stop there, you don’t need this video. But if you’re looking forward anxiously to getting inked, or getting more ink, then maybe it might be a good idea to watch, listen, and ponder the wisdom of Morison’s words.

And if you know somebody who is, especially a teenage girl, it might not be a bad idea to share. The self-respect you save could be that of someone you care about.

UPDATE: The above-linked video was directed primarily at young women. He has since posted one directed toward young men:

Nothing Says Woman Quite Like a Dress – Crisis Magazine

Source: Nothing Says Woman Quite Like a Dress – Crisis Magazine

If there is one thing that I think is a vibrantly encouraging sign in the process of re-traditionalization in the West – a movement which seems slowly but surely to be gathering momentum – it is the way in which more and more women seem to be finding value in traditional feminine practices, whether it is home-making, the wearing of the veil in church, or in this case, what used to be the sine qua non of femininity, wearing a dress.

I will gladly admit, I am biased: I grew up with women wearing dresses. Both my grandmothers, and my mother, wore exclusively dresses or skirts – even for housework – all through my childhood and young-adult years, and in fact until the day they died. Ma, it is true, did try out the “pantsuit,” when those were in fashion; but she was not comfortable in it and quickly abandoned it, despite the protests of my older brothers, who I suppose wanted a “hip” mother.

Well, Ma may not have been “hip,” but she was a wonderful mother, wife, and homemaker, and my absolute model and ideal of feminine beauty – inside and out! So while I confess to appreciating, in my more carnal moments, the appeal of an attractive young woman in well-fitting jeans, shorts, or a short skirt, it is a dress, or a well-chosen skirt-and-blouse ensemble, that says “womanhood” to me. Continue reading “Nothing Says Woman Quite Like a Dress – Crisis Magazine”

Re-Asserting a Feminine Tradition – Crisis Magazine

I wear the chapel veil at Mass as an affirmation and an embrace of my feminine difference. According to the ancient traditions of the Church, only women may be veiled in the presence of God…

Tradition binds us together and gives our faith a richness, mystery, and depth that the modern world finds frightening because it cannot be satisfactorily explained.

Source: Re-Asserting a Feminine Tradition – Crisis Magazine

I post about this periodically because I think that veiling – while always voluntary and optional – is a powerful symbol of femininity, and the sacred distinctiveness of women, at a time when our popular, secular society seems to be bound, bent, and determined to eradicate true distinctiveness in, ironically, the name of “diversity.” So this article is particularly powerful, for me, because the author is a woman who is saying the same thing… only much better than I could, and “from the inside,” so to speak. Here are a few excerpts:

“The problem is, the modern world is trying to liberate us from ourselves. Modern society demands that women be able to compete with men, to show that there is nothing actually different about us. The modern world, for all of its lip-service to diversity, is terrified of differences. It does not know how to cope with true differences because it can only see relationships in terms of power struggles: who can best whom, who is oppressing whom? If you are different, if you have a different nature then, the modern world concludes, it must be because some tyrannical force is keeping you from your full potential to be exactly the same as everyone else.

“But true equality is not sameness. God created us male and female and found us to be very good, but he did not ever intend to create us exactly the same, with irrelevant bodily differences that can be hacked off, ignored, or chemically altered as we see fit. God is entirely too fine a craftsman for that… The contraceptive mentality of the modern world is attempting to eradicate this difference, this distinctively feminine difference, in pursuit of its value of sameness that it has mistaken for equality. In these days, when the life of the unborn is held rather cheaply, and the family is under assault, I wear the chapel veil as an embrace of my distinctly feminine nature.”

Two other points, one specific to veiling, the other more general:

“According to the ancient traditions of the Church, only women may be veiled in the presence of God… Men are not allowed to cover their heads in church. When the bishop and the pope remove their head coverings, they are submitting themselves in humility before the presence of God, not asserting some sort of male superiority with their bare heads. When more of society wore hats, it was a much more obvious sign, but even today, we acknowledge that when a man removes his hat, it is a sign of deference and respect—and if you need a reminder, pay attention the next time the national anthem is sung.”

That is powerful. As I said, veiling is voluntary and optional. But for those who choose to participate, this is something they can do that men cannot: women alone are allowed to be veiled, to have their heads covered in the presence of God. Men, in contrast, must “uncover,” they must remove their hats in God’s presence. This is something I was sorta-kinda aware of – of course I knew since childhood that I had to take my hat off in church – but this nonetheless really rather smacked me in the face. There’s more that she shares about this in the article, and it’s worth reading.

And then there’s this, which I quoted at the beginning:

“Tradition binds us together and gives our faith a richness, mystery, and depth that the modern world finds frightening because it cannot be satisfactorily explained.”

To which I can only say, amen!

Mother and Daughter Country Sweethearts Aprons

Source: Mother and Daughter Country Sweethearts Aprons

It saddens me that so few women wear aprons these days. It may seem a small thing, in a world in which so many terrible things are happening (this very day, a radical Islamic terrorist from Uzbekistan ran down and killed at least eight people in Manhattan with a truck, while shouting “Allahu akbar!”), but it is both a symbol and a thing itself.

Aprons are attractive and feminine, as well as being useful for keeping a woman’s clothes clean (and if they have pockets, carrying needful items for sewing, cooking, or wiping the tears of a sobbing child). But they are also a uniform, of a sort: the uniform of a woman who takes caring for her home and family seriously – a priority, not just one among many possible tasks, that she may, or may not, do if she has time.

And if she has a daughter, and they are wearing a matching mother-daughter set like this one, she is both setting an example and encouraging solidarity and emulation on the part of the rising generation. That is something which has always been important, but now that it is no longer taken for granted, no longer a given, is perhaps more vital than ever!

A woman who puts on an apron is girding herself for battle with entropy, chaos, and dissolution. She is taking a stand against disorder on the domestic front, and in so doing, she is also taking a stand against disorder in the wider world. That may sound excessively cosmic, but I think there is real truth to it. So I am happy to see these! Hope they encourage more women to “put on the uniform,” and take up the fight.

 


 

(The others on the page are lovely, too. The only thing I wish is that the pictures showed an actual mother with her daughter! Although I suspect she’s probably the one taking said pictures…)

Feminism -vs- feminine principle

It should be clear to any inquiring mind that modern Feminism has absolutely no desire to celebrate the Feminine Principle but has every desire to abandon it in favor of the Masculine Principle and to merely demote actual men to the status of the Bestial Principle. Or, to put it more clearly, Modern Feminism wishes to make women into men and men into baboons – sports-watching, beer-drinking, sex-obsessed, dullard baboons. What Feminism leaves behind in this move, ironically, is anything authentically Feminine.

“… Modern Feminism wishes to make women into men and men into baboons – sports-watching, beer-drinking, sex-obsessed, dullard baboons.” While simultaneously, ironically, and hypocritically, complaining about them being so.

The Deeper Meaning Behind Wearing a Dirndl – Rare Dirndl Blog

Source: The Deeper Meaning Behind Wearing a Dirndl – Rare Dirndl Blog

Another diversion to the German side of my ancestral heritage! I have to confess, I like seeing a woman wearing a dirndl – if it’s a real one, not (as the author puts it) a “beer wench costume [from] Amazon”: always have, always will. I also very much enjoyed this blog post’s discussion of the deeper implications of dirndl-wearing.

And I particularly like the young woman in the picture above, because this is a contemporary rendition of the traditional outfit, proving a) that it’s not just an antiquarian affectation, and b) as I have said more than once on this blog, traditional is attractive! It is possible to be demure and alluring at the same time, and this lovely young lady is proof.