Painstaking restoration underway to preserve Carter’s Grove

Carter’s Grove, one of the country’s most significant examples of Georgian architecture, survived the Revolutionary War and the Civil War.

Source: Painstaking restoration underway to preserve Carter’s Grove | Lifestyles | dailyprogress.com

Attacked in recent years by insects and damaged by water, the property on the north shore of the James River in James City County was in danger of falling into disrepair until a Chicago businessman bought the property about 8 miles southeast of historic Williamsburg in 2014 for $7.2 million — and took on the monumental task of preserving it.

While I am sorry it is no longer part of Colonial Williamsburg, I am very glad Carter’s Grove – one of the finest examples of a Georgian-era stately home in the United States – is being restored by someone who cares about the place! It was a feature of just about every visit to Williamsburg with my family, when I was growing up, and we went often. I hope the owner will open it to the public once again, when the restoration is complete. But in any case, it’s good to know the work is being done!

Work begins to try to save Christianity’s holiest shrine: Jesus’ tomb – The Washington Post

They are trying to save the holiest site in Christendom: “We don’t know what we will find.”

Source: Work begins to try to save Christianity’s holiest shrine: Jesus’ tomb – The Washington Post

“The work will finally begin, and it is past time,” said the Rev. Peter Vasko, president of the Franciscan Foundation for the Holy Land.

“The place is falling apart,” he said.

Vasko recalled the first time he prayed over the covered tomb as a young priest and trembled with the realization, “I am not worthy.”

“This is the real thing,” Vasko said. “It is not a holy place. It is the holy place.”

Tomb Of The King – YouTube

One of the things which struck me with great force as I toured England and Scotland in 1985, and Ireland, England, and Wales in 1990, was the tremendous antiquity in which the very land was steeped. It was awe-inspiring enough to touch Roman brick (!), for person born and raised in a country that things 300 years is “old,” but the heritage of the British Isles goes so much further back than that… I was particularly taken by the barrow-mounds, to which I had been first introduced in fictional form through the works of J.R.R. Tolkien. To actually be face-to-face with true barrows, in all their reality (though without, so far as I know, barrow-wights), was a remarkable experience.

But familiarity breeds contempt, they say; and it was with great sadness that I learned, later in life, that not all in Britain share this American-of-British-ancestry’s passion, respect, and even reverence for a past which reaches back thousands of years, yet retains a strange and mystic continuity with the present. Just as Americans seem to think nothing turning areas of great natural beauty into strip malls or housing developments, it seems that there are interests in Britain that think nothing of driving roads through, or building car-parks on top of, ancient structures that have stood for millennia… including the tombs of prehistoric kings and chieftains.

In this haunting song, Damh the Bard sings of one such barrow. I do not know whether it is intended to be entirely representative, or whether he had a specific site in mind when he wrote it, but either way, he evokes the feelings of sadness and frustration I myself feel when I hear of antiquities — whether ancient Oaks or ancient Barrows — bulldozed for the sake of what we so glibly call “progress.” In hopes that we may someday, as humans, outgrow our childish lack of respect for those who came before, I give you Damh the Bard’s “The Tomb of the King.”