Europe’s Civilizational Exhaustion – Gatestone Institute

Pictured: French police eject some of the 80 migrants and pro-illegal-immigration activists who occupied the Basilica of Saint Denis, on March 18, 2018. (Image source: Video screenshot, YouTube/Kenyan News & Politics)

“In Sweden, by 2050, almost one in three people will be Muslim. The civilizational exhaustion is seen in Europeans’ falling birth rates, mushrooming public debt, chaos in the streets, and a refusal to invest in security. Islam is filling the cultural vacuum of a society with no children and which believes – wrongly – it has no enemies.”

Source: Europe’s Civilizational Exhaustion | Gatestone Institute

  • Islam is filling the cultural vacuum of a society with no children and which believes — wrongly — it has no enemies.
  • In Sweden, by 2050, almost one in three people will be Muslim.
  • The European mainstream mindset now seems to believe that “evil” comes only from our own sins: racism, sexism, elitism, xenophobia, homophobia, the guilt of the heterosexual white Western male — and never from non-European cultures. Europe now postulates an infinite idealization of the “other”, above all the migrant.
  • A tiredness seems to be why these countries do not take meaningful measures to defeat jihadism, such as closing Salafist mosques or expelling radical imams.
  • Muslim extremists understand this advantage: so long as they avoid another enormous massacre like 9/11, they will be able to continue taking away human lives and undermining the West without awakening it from its inertia.

Is this really what we want? Because it’s what we’re going to get, if we don’t – collectively – wake up, and start defending what is valuable: our history, our culture, our heritage.

This essay – which makes for sobering reading, but for that very reason should be read, marked, learned, and inwardly digested by defenders of the West – continues,

Stephen Bullivant, a professor of theology and the sociology of religion at St Mary’s University in London, recently published a report, “Europe’s Young Adults and Religion”:

“Christianity as a default, as a norm, is gone, and probably gone for good – or at least for the next 100 years,” Bullivant said.

According to Bullivant, many young Europeans “will have been baptised and then never darken the door of a church again. Cultural religious identities just aren’t being passed on from parents to children. It just washes straight off them… “And we know the Muslim birthrate is higher than the general population, and they have much higher [religious] retention rates.”

That is a very dangerous and worrying combination – to put it mildly. The situation has gotten so bad that no less a figure than Richard Dawkins, who is as this essay notes is

an atheist and the author of The God Delusion, responded to the study’s release by tweeting to his millions of Twitter followers:

Before we rejoice at the death throes of the relatively benign Christian religion, let’s not forget Hilaire Belloc’s menacing rhyme:

“Always keep a-hold of nurse
For fear of finding something worse.”

Dawkins is apparently concerned that after the demise of Christianity in Europe, there will not be an atheistic utopia, but a rising Islam.

Dawkins’ concern is well-founded. Secularists and atheists of Dawkins’ ilk – not, clearly, Dawkins himself, who though misguided is vastly more intelligent than many of his followers – have been happy enough to use Islam (*) as a foil for Christianity (and I would not be surprised if many have not rejoiced, secretly, in the deaths of Christians in the Middle East and elsewhere), believing that it is doing much of their work for them, and that they can then control and enervate it, too.

This makes about as much sense as trying to chain a dragon to boil a pot of tea. What they fail to realize is that those who passionately believe in something – whether that “something” is truth or falsehood, witness the passionate belief in Communism many still possess, despite its theoretical “defeat” in the 1980s and ’90s – will always have an edge over those who believe in nothing. And unlike the heirs of Western Christendom, Islam is not tired, not exhausted: it has had a rest of some centuries, and has awoken.

It is time, and past time, for us to awaken, too – to awaken to our peril, and to defend ourselves against it. We have a moral responsibility to do so (and as Christians, a religious duty, since Islam is a false religion, and a dangerous ideology): not only for ourselves, but for our ancestors, and for our descendants. So far, we are abjectly failing both. We are betraying our patrimony, by failing to defend it, and pass it on.

What is at stake, here? Let’s look to history: when the Iberian Peninsula fell to the Muslims, it took 700 years to reconquer it – and that was with most of the rest of Europe free. How long will the Reconquista take, if the whole West should fall? None of us will live to see it! But if we fail to wake up, we may live to see that fall.

Again I ask: is this really what we want?

 


• And more generally, multiculturalism and mass immigration, which – far from being a source of strength – weakens and breaks down cultural cohesiveness and integrity, and damages the host culture’s ability to defend itself against attacks both from within and from without. But Islam is the most significant unifying force among many of these immigrants, especially in Europe, and increasingly in the U.S., too.

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Christian Persecution and Genocide Is Worse Now Than “Any Time in History,” Report Says

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“Not only are Christians more persecuted than any other faith group, but ever-increasing numbers are experiencing the very worst forms of persecution.”

Source: Christian Persecution and Genocide Is Worse Now Than “Any Time in History,” Report Says |Newsweek

Sadly, this article has caused me to add a new tag to my list: “Persecution of Christians.”

Incredibly, there are still those who believe that Christians “have a persecution complex,” that we are the ones doing the “persecuting,” and if anyone does attack us, it’s no more than we deserve. Well, it’s not a persecution “complex” if we really are being persecuted – and we are indeed, as this report makes plain.

“The persecution and genocide of Christians across the world is worse today “than at any time in history,” and Western governments are failing to stop it, a report from a Catholic organization said.

“The study by Aid to the Church in Need said the treatment of Christians has worsened substantially in the past two years compared with the two years prior, and has grown more violent than any other period in modern times…

“The report examined the plight of Christians in China, Egypt, Eritrea, India, Iran, Iraq, Nigeria, North Korea, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria and Turkey over the period lasting from 2015 until 2017. The research showed that in that time, Christians suffered crimes against humanity, and some were hanged or crucified.

“The report found that Saudi Arabia was the only country where the situation for Christians did not get worse, and that was only because the situation couldn’t get any worse than it already was.”

The Newsweek article goes on to add that

“The report put special focus on Middle Eastern countries like Iraq and Syria, where the authors argued Christians would have been entirely wiped out if it weren’t for military action and the assistance of Christian humanitarian organizations, like Aid to the Church in Need.

“The defeat of Daesh [the Islamic State militant group] and other Islamists in major strongholds of the Middle East offers the last hope of recovery for Christian groups threatened with extinction,” the report found. “Many would not survive another similar violent attack.”

Nor is the violence limited to the Middle East.

“In Africa, the report focused on countries like Sudan, where the government ordered that churches be destroyed, and Nigeria, where ISIS-affiliated groups like Boko Haram have led a surge in attacks on Christians. In Eritrea, hundreds of Christians have been rounded up and imprisoned over the past year because of their faith.

“The report also documented numerous case studies in which Christians in countries such as India and Nigeria were murdered or beaten for practicing their faith.”

The majority of these crimes are – not surprisingly – perpetrated by Muslims, whether in the Middle East or Africa, with the addition (more surprisingly, to someone like myself who since my college days had believed the assertion that “polytheists are religiously tolerant”) of some militant Hindus in India.

It is true that the situation has not yet really reached the U.S., and is only beginning to impact Europe. But we are islands in the storm, and the sea is rising. What makes the situation even more alarming is that Western governments seem all too eager to welcome in large numbers of immigrants from many of the very regions and even countries where the problem is greatest.

I am moderately confident that it is true, as is always claimed, that the majority of these are peace-loving and non-violent. But I suspect the majority are basically peace-loving and non-violent in the countries where Christians are under violent attack, too. It doesn’t take a particularly large percentage of malefactors to cause a large problem!

And the cultural and religious milieu supports the militants, whether or not the majority of the population does. Do we really wish to import this problem into the West? I don’t!

As to the belief that Christians deserve to be persecuted for their actual or alleged crimes in the past – anyone who believes that is either sadly deluded, or mentally disturbed. Yes, it’s true that some Christians have committed some unfortunate and even terrible acts in the name of their faith, over the centuries. It’s called human nature… or, in Christian terms, sinfulness. And it is far from unique to Christianity!

As a faith, however, Christianity teaches love of one’s neighbor, and even for one’s persecutors (it is possible to love someone in principle while still using whatever means necessary to prevent them from harming oneself or others, so let us set aside the idea that a Christian must be a pacifist, immediately), in a way that few other religions – and certainly not Islam – does not.

And Christians have been in the forefront of movements to end slavery, seek peaceful relations between nations and peoples, and even to provide medical, agricultural, and other assistance to less-developed nations, engage in disaster relief, assist displaced persons, and many other such activities.

Indeed, one of the great ironies of the present crisis is that through its strong support of aid to the down-trodden, Christianity has been partially responsible for the population explosion in some parts of the world that are distinctly unfriendly to Christianity, and the West! But that, unfortunately, is a chance one takes when one is trying to be decent to other people.

But here again, the question arises: do we really want to welcome into our own nations people who are unfriendly to us, or whose cultures and value systems are alien, even inimical, to ours? Particularly in large numbers? A few here and there can be assimilated, or if they are not, are unlikely to cause much trouble. But en masse… well, the “no-go” zones appearing in a growing number of European cities should serve as a cautionary tale, in my opinion.

With respect to Christianity, and our Christian responsibility to love our neighbor, and welcome the stranger: as I have commented before, in the parable of the “Good Samaritan,” even that compassionate and benevolent individual did not welcome the person he helped into his own home. He set him up in an inn, and paid the innkeeper to nurse him back to health. Nor is there any indication that he continued to support him, once health was restored. These points should, I think, serve as a model for us!

Loving your neighbor as yourself starts with loving yourself: not to excess, but in a properly ordered fashion. And loving yourself includes having self-respect, without which it is unrealistic to expect anyone else to respect you, either. It also includes the willingness and ability to protect yourself, and those you love (by extrapolation including your nation and culture), from those who would harm or assault them. Anything else is not love, but a form of self-immolation.

And even if you are willing to sacrifice yourself for another – which, if done for the right reasons, can be praiseworthy (if done for the right reasons… otherwise, it’s just foolishness) – no one has the right to sacrifice others, or to fail to defend them if that is within one’s power. And beyond individuals, we have both a right and a responsibility under natural law – which is, after all, God’s law – to protect and defend our people and our heritage, that we might pass them on, undiminished, to our posterity.

Pope Pius XII - Sacred inheritance

Again, our responsibility to those who came before and to those who will come after (*) are factors which must be taken into account. We can sacrifice ourselves, and our own possessions, if we so choose; but we do not have the right to sacrifice others, or their possessions and patrimony.

(* Remember the famous “seven generations” of Native American lore? As in, whatever we do should be considered in light of seven generations? This refers to the effect of that action, or inaction, on our own generation, plus the three generations that came before us, and the three that will follow – that is to say, ourselves, our ancestors, and our descendants – that none be dishonoured. Something even those of us who are not Native Americans might profitably keep in mind!)

It is this collective, community-focused, social and cultural responsibility which is often missed or ignored by people who have been trained by our dysfunctional culture to believe that it’s all about me, and what I want. Charity really does begin at home, with our family and our immediate community; once they are cared for, protected, etc., then we can widen the circle – carefully and advisedly, and not beyond our means – outward. But if we help others at the expense of our own (family, people, community), that is not morally virtuous, it is morally vicious.

So, to conclude: this report, from Aid to the Church in Need, makes it clear that the persecution and genocide of Christians across the world is worse today “than at any time in history,” and that Western governments are failing to stop it. We need to do what we can, and pressure our governments to do what they can, to try to protect persecuted Christians world-wise – and we need to push back against the false claim that Christians are the persecutors, and not the persecuted.

But we also need to make sure that we are not importing the problem onto our own shores, and into our own cultures. We of the West cannot be a bastion for others if we are allowing ourselves to be undermined! We need to stand strong, and limit immigration to those who we can be confident will be assets, not liabilities; who support our values, and who will be a benefit, not a detriment, to our cultures.

And not solely for our own sakes: for all our faults, the Western world is the last, best hope for freedom and opportunity. We cannot take everyone in! But we can serve as an example, an inspiration, and (cautiously) as a resource. While it’s a mistake to confuse any earthly entity or institution with the Kingdom of God, we are the closest thing the secular world has to that “shining City on a hill” mentioned in Scriptures – and the closer we cleave to our Judeo-Christian patrimony, the brighter we shine. If our light has dimmed in recent times, it is because we have fallen away from that ideal.

Should the West ever fall entirely, the outlook for the rest of the world will be bleak and dark indeed.

Richard Dawkins: Islam Is ‘The Most Evil Religion In The World’ | Interface Institute

Source: Richard Dawkins: Islam Is ‘The Most Evil Religion In The World’ | Interface Institute

I am no fan of Richard Dawkins, by any means. But it is interesting, to say the least, that although this über-“liberal” militant atheist has been largely lionized by the Left through decades of criticizing Christianity, the “PC police” jump on him when he dares to turn his critique to Islam!

Do they really think they wouldn’t be the first against the wall, or lined up on their knees to be beheaded, if the likes of ISIS or Iran’s “Revolutionary Guard” were ever to come to power in the West?

“In a speech at the Cheltenham Science Festival in the U.K., Dawkins slammed the moral idiocy of cultural relativism, arguing against the ill-conceived notion that all religions are more or less the same.

“’It’s tempting to say all religions are bad, and I do say all religions are bad, but it’s a worse temptation to say all religions are equally bad because they’re not,’ he stated.

“Refusing to submit to de facto blasphemy laws, Dawkins then dropped the bomb.

“’If you look at the actual impact that different religions have on the world it’s quite apparent that at present the most evil religion in the world has to be Islam,’ he said in no uncertain terms.”

Interesting, as a side note, that he uses the term “evil,” which is a theological term as well as a moral category (in the ancient world, from which our ideas of morality and ethics came, there was no clear-cut distinction between the two, as we sometimes like to pretend there is today).

If there were no objective moral standard, how could one speak of Islam as “evil”? It would simply be one of the best ideologies, at present, at achieving dominance – at least in certain spheres. And if there is a moral standard, where did it come from, in the absence of a Divine Lawgiver…?

Just sayin’…!

Leaked recording: Berlin police instructor calls Muslim recruits ‘enemy in our ranks’

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Source: Leaked recording: Berlin police instructor calls Muslim recruits ‘enemy in our ranks’

Sadly, this does not come as a surprise!

On the tape, the unidentified police instructor complains that many officers who come from migrant backgrounds, particularly those of Turkish and Arabic origins, refuse to pay attention in the academy classrooms and many have trouble speaking or writing German, Die Welt reported…

These Muslim recruits have put the future of the Berlin police force in jeopardy according to the instructor who said the migrant police officers would be “a second-class of police that will only be corrupt”.

“These are not colleagues, that’s the enemy. This is the enemy in our ranks and I have never felt such hostility in this class,” he added.

An English friend of mine on Facebook comments, “My son attended an Uniformed Services course at College prior to joining the Paras, and he said the same thing about the Middle Eastern [students] on his course. He said 50% of the class were made up of them, they were lazy, cheeky, stupid, bereft of discipline and he thought they were there for inside information to help them fight against us.”

Unfortunately I would not be a bit surprised. I am reminded of the fact that the 9/11 terrorists here in the U.S. learned to fly the airliners they used as weapons at American flight schools. The idea of Muslims in Germany and Britain learning information, tactics, etc., from the police and military of those countries seems all too credible, to me.

Kindness, openness, and willingness to share information has been a hallmark of Western society for centuries, and especially following the end of the Second World War – and heretofore, it has been a source of strength. But in the present environment, it seems to be more a source of vulnerability.

Touché!

British Prime Minister Theresa May reacting to the recent train-bombing in London by an 18-year-old Islamic immigrant

STEP 1) Feign shock
STEP 2) Express resolve
STEP 3) Say good things about Islam
STEP 4) Pretend that taking in more Muslims “defeats terrorists” and makes us safer

Source: The Religion of Peace

London bombing shows danger of Islamification in Britain and Europe. Is the US next? | Fox News

The terrorist bombing Friday of a train on the London Underground, which injured 30 people – including one of my very close friends – was yet more evidence of a painful truth: the Islamification of the United Kingdom and Europe is well under way, changing the very character of the continent that gave birth to Western Civilization.

Source: London bombing shows danger of Islamification in Britain and Europe. Is the US next? | Fox News

This is indeed an excellent essay, and the fact that it is written by someone who was, herself, touched by the latest bombing in London – through a friend of hers, who was fortunate that when the bomb detonated in her train compartment, it did not go off properly. I strongly recommend that you “read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest” this essay!

But like most other writings on the subject of Islam, in her commendable zeal to protect religious liberty and avoid tarring with too broad a brush, Ms Davis misses a few important points.

She quotes the Brookings Institute definition of Islamism, which of course is quite accurate, as far as it goes. However, consider: any religion worth its salt believes that its “values should play a role in public life,” and that it “has things to say about how politics should be conducted, how the law should be applied, and how other people – not just themselves – should conduct themselves.” If it does not, it hardly qualifies as a religion at all: at best, it is some form of nebulous personal spirituality.

Certainly, Christianity has things to say about these issues. Buddhism (more so in the East than in the West, but in some places even here) has things to say about these issues. Hinduism and certainly Taoism have things to say about these issues. The difference lies in how those values are promoted and expressed, and what the religion in question sees as its ultimate role in society.

I don’t feel that I can speak authoritatively for the other religions mentioned, but I do believe that I can speak fairly authoritatively for Christianity, having degrees in medieval studies and theology and being an ordained Christian minister. And what I can say is that while Christianity has certainly not been immune to the temptations to power-politics and even violence that come from a too-close alliance with secular authorities, such things are foreign and even contrary to the teachings of the Christian faith itself.

The fundamental teachings of Christianity are encapsulated in Christ’s summary of the law: “Love the Lord your God… and your neighbor as yourself.” This concept is repeated and reinforced in such passages as “love your enemies, and pray for those who persecute you,” and “a new commandment I give unto you: that you love one another.” Similar teachings appear in the writings of the Apostles, Christ’s successors after His crucifixion, resurrection, and ascension.

And his final instruction was to “go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.” Baptize. Not conquer. Not subjugate. Not kill. Baptize. That is a voluntary action: one must make a choice to receive the teachings, before baptism can take place (1). Nowhere is violence called for (2). Nowhere are Christians called to fight, kill, or make war against the “infidel.” Nowhere are they told to make non-Christians second-class citizens (dhimmi) who must die, convert, or admit they are inferior and pay protection money (jizya).

Beyond that, Christians are supposed to be the “leaven in the loaf” of the body politic, not its rulers and dominators. Christ was clear about this, stating “My kingdom is not of this world,” and instructing his listeners to “render unto Caesar the things that are Caesar’s, and to God the things that are God’s.” His Apostles followed the same track, exhorting the early Christians to “honour the king,” and to obey the secular authorities, including the (then pagan) Roman Emperor. Christians were – and are – intended to seek to exert a positive influence on the actions of secular and political authorities by example and moral exhortation, not, as I say, domination and rulership.

So Christianity has, and God willing will continue to have, “things to say” about “how politics should be conducted, how the law should be applied, and how [people in general] should conduct themselves.” The important point is that the Christian faith itself – regardless of what deluded or over-zealous devotees may have done on their own initiative – does not teach that Christianity, or its followers, should politically dominate the world, and it does not teach violence as a way to spread its teachings. You can search the New Testament, and for that matter the Fathers of the Church (approximately corresponding to Islamic prophet Mohammed’s immediate successors), in vain for any such teachings.

And that is the point that so many otherwise intelligent and perceptive individuals – on both sides of the political aisle – consistently miss, or misunderstand: Islam is not just another religion. It does not merely believe that “its values should play a role in public life.” It does not simply have “things to say about how politics should be conducted, how the law should be applied, and how other people… should conduct themselves.” Would that that’s all it were! But it is not.

It is a religious / spiritual / theological justification for absolute dominance, conquest, and subjugation, in all realms: religious, political, judicial, economic, and military. One is either part of the Dar al-Islam, the Realm of Submission to Allah, or one is part of the Dar al-Harb, the Realm of Conflict, and thus subject to conquest so that submission to Allah may be enforced upon you. Those are the choices. And that is why the present contest between the West and Islam is a civilizational, existential conflict, whether one likes to think of it in those terms or not. Islam has not left us any choice in the matter.

All of that said: this is nonetheless a cogent and timely article, and an important warning for us, here in the U.S. It is well worth a read! Just don’t let yourself get caught up into too erroneous concepts, which this otherwise superb essay implicitly accepts: a) that Islam / Islamism is just a religion, and that b) no other religion has, or should have, things to say to and about the rest of (secular) society.

Personally, as The Anglophilic Anglican, I am heartsick at what is happening in Britain, and I pray it’s not too late to reverse it. But it will take some doing, and it may take sterner measures than people nowadays have the stomach for, unfortunately.

I also pray that we may resist this evil – and yes, it is an evil, both Islam and its Sharia law, and the loss of Western values, ideals, and the history and heritage of our Western civilization to Islam – here in the United States. Better not to let it gain any more of a foothold than it already has, rather than trying to get the camel back out once it’s already in the tent!


 

(1) Yes, I know there were some mass, forced baptisms in the course of the conversion of Europe. But those were the exceptions rather than the rule; they were done by secular rulers for primarily political purposes; and they were clearly contrary to the teachings of the Christian faith. Everyone has sinned and fallen short, and Christians are no exceptions.

(2) Christ’s most violent action was to make a whip of knotted cords and drive the money changers out of the Temple, turning over their tables. Not, please note, killing them! And when he exhorts his disciples that “let he who has no sword sell his cloak and buy one,” and is told they have two swords (for twelve disciples) he says, “It is enough.” When one of them actually uses his sword, cutting off the ear of the High Priest’s servant, Christ heals him. Contrast that to the actions of the Prophet of Islam and tell me there is moral equivalency between the two!

British academic and journalist Douglas Murray schools pro-immigration activists on immigration – YouTube

I have to confess, I had not even heard of Douglas Murray, that I can recall, until literally a few days ago. But in my opinion, he’s brilliant. Very, very well said, Sir!

Heck, you want to talk colonialism? It’s not just the Ottoman Empire – although he is completely right to point to them as a prime example. It’s the whole sweep of Islam across the Middle East, North Africa, and southern Europe, including the Iberian Peninsula in the 7th and early 8th centuries, and far beyond later on, all the way to India, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines… If that’s not colonialism, I don’t know what is!

I like what one Indian commentator had to say on the subject (ellipses are in the original):

Bravo. As an Indian, I’ve noticed everyone loves to blame the British, while conveniently forgetting Muslims (Turkish mainly) that have destroyed and robbed India. The British used India as a business to generate their wealth and in turn ended up building functional infrastructures still in use.

What the Muslims did was erect f_cking monuments of oppression… and mosques over desecrated Temples and completely eradicate our history in many places. British only tried to enslave us while empowering some locals.. but Muslims not only enslaved us but killed us and very strongly tried to change our identities. British came here and learnt from India.. but Muslims came and robbed our knowledge to claim it as their own and burnt the rest.

People need to stop thinking every f_cking thing against Muslims is Islamophobia…. In the new age, you are able to stand freely against colonialism / anything else really when it comes to the “West” … but if it were still Islamic, you’d be silenced swiftly like an animal (as the Muslims boast in their taunts towards free speech activists).

Indeed. The double-standard is strong in the Left! Especially ironic, since they’d be among the first against the wall, tossed from tall buildings, or beheaded, if Islam ever actually did come to power in the West…

And yes, the “alt-right” is correct: as promoted and practiced by many (most) Left-wing activists today, “diversity” and “multi-culturalism” are indeed code words for being anti-white, anti-European – for rejecting and seeking to overthrow the West, both culturally and demographically. That may not be a popular view in many quarters, but it is a fact, and readily apparent if you’re paying attention.