What is Maundy Thursday 2018? The meaning behind Holy Thursday, the Last Supper and how the Queen marks occasion | Mirror Online

Her Majesty The Queen, and The Duke of Edinburgh, at the Royal Maundy Service at Blackburn Cathedral.

Her Majesty takes part in the ancient Royal Maundy Thursday service, where she will distribute coins

Source: What is Maundy Thursday 2018? The meaning behind Holy Thursday, the Last Supper and how the Queen marks occasion | Mirror Online

A brief synopsis, from this article:

Also called Holy Thursday, Covenant Thursday, Sheer Thursday and Thursday of Mysteries, Maundy Thursday marks the beginning of the three day celebration of Easter, an important time in the Christian calendar.

The day comes before Good Friday, and this year it has fallen on March 29.

It commemorates the last supper of Jesus Christ, when Christians believe he shared bread and wine with his disciples.

According to the Bible, Jesus also washed the feet of his followers and commanded them to love each other.

The word Maundy comes from the Latin word ‘mandatum’, meaning command.

How is Maundy Thursday marked in the UK?

The Queen will mark Maundy Thursday by distributing alms as part of a tradition dating back to the 13th century.

She will be accompanied by the Duke of Edinburgh for the service at Leicester Cathedral where the Maundy Money will be distributed to 91 men and 91 women – representing each of her 91 years.

The 182 recipients of the Maundy money are senior citizens who will be given the gifts in recognition of the service they have given to the church and their local area.

Wishing all of my Christian readers – English or not! – a holy and blessed Maundy Thursday, and remainder of this Sacred Triduum.

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The Queen Opens Up On Wearing The Crown | Royal Reviewer (YouTube)

 In this video we will be taking a look at The Queen as she speaks candidly about wearing the crown jewels and attending her own Coronation.

Source:  Royal Reviewer (YouTube)

Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II – called by some “the last Christian Monarch” – speaks on the practical difficulties of Crowns and Coronations. Also includes a look at the other Royal Regalia which are part of the last Coronation service in the world with roots extending back into the Middle Ages: a remarkable example of the continuity of the British Monarchy.

I found myself especially moved and touched by the Sovereign’s Ring – “known by some as the Wedding Ring of England,” which symbolizes the lifetime commitment of the Monarch.

Her Majesty The Queen has certainly dedicated her life to serving her people and Kingdom – indeed, the United Kingdom, as well as the Commonwealth Realms of which she is Head of State – as she promised at her unexpected Accession, following the untimely death of her father, King George VI.

She has done it with grace, poise, and dignity, as well as consummate wisdom and shrewdness, for longer than any other British Monarch, and with unmatched skill. Loved and respected by her own people and by millions around the world, it will be long e’er we see her like again.

May God continue to grant Her Majesty health and long life!

Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II – Accession Portait

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II - Accession Portait

A further celebration of the Accession of Her Majesty, The Queen, on this the 66th year of her reign. God save The Queen! And may our gracious Lord grant her continued health and long life!

O LORD our heavenly Father, high and mighty, King of kings, Lord of lords, the only Ruler of princes, who dost from thy throne behold all the dwellers upon earth; Most heartily we beseech thee with thy favour to behold our most gracious Sovereign Lady, Queen ELIZABETH; and so replenish her with the grace of thy Holy Spirit, that she may always incline to thy will, and walk in thy way: Endue her plenteously with heavenly gifts; grant her in health and wealth long to live; strengthen her that she may vanquish and overcome all her enemies; and finally, after this life, she may attain everlasting joy and felicity: through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

— “A Prayer for the Queen’s Majesty,” Book of Common Prayer 1662 (UK)

God save The Queen! On the 66th anniversary of her Accession to the Throne

HM Queen Elizabeth on her Accession

Today is the 66th anniversary of the Accession of Her Majesty. Always a bittersweet day for the Queen, coming as it did as a result of the death of her dear father, His Late Majesty King George VI, aged only 56.

— from the Constitutional Monarch Association

ALMIGHTY God, who rulest over all the kingdoms of the world, and dost order them according to thy good pleasure: We yield thee unfeigned thanks, for that thou wast pleased, as on this day, to set thy Servant our Sovereign Lady, Queen ELIZABETH, upon the Throne of this Realm. Let thy wisdom be her guide, and let thine arm strengthen her; let truth and justice, holiness and righteousness, peace and charity, abound in her days; direct all her counsels and endeavours to thy glory, and the welfare of her subjects; give us grace to obey her cheerfully for conscience sake, and let her always possess the hearts of her people; let her reign be long and prosperous, and crown her with everlasting life in the world to come; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Commemoration of Charles I of England, King and Martyr (1649)

Sanctus Carolus Defensor Fidei

Charles I of England and Scotland, King and Martyr: 30 January 1649

(from today’s entry in the late James Kiefer’s excellent series of hagiographies)

At the end, when Charles was Cromwell’s prisoner, he was required to assent to a law abolishing bishops in the Church of England. He had previously given his consent to such an abolition in Scotland, where the Puritans were in the majority, but here he dug in his heels and declared that Bishops were part of the Church as God had established it, and that he could not in conscience assent to Cromwell’s demand. His refusal sealed his doom, and it is for this that he is accounted a martyr, since he could have saved his life by giving in on this question. He was brought to trial before Parliament, found guilty of treason, and beheaded 30 January 1649. On the scaffold, he said (I quote from memory and may not have the exact words):

“No man in England is a better friend to liberty than myself, But I must tell you plainly that the liberty of subjects consists not in having a hand in the government, but in having that government, and those laws, whereby their lives and their goods may be most their own.”

That is to say, one may reasonably ask of a government that it establish justice in the land; so that judges do not take bribes, so that innocent men are not convicted of crimes, while the guilty are convicted and punished, so that honest men need fear neither robbers nor the sheriff. One may further ask that taxes be not excessive, and that punishments be not disproportionate to the crime. Charles would have said,

“Do not ask whether the laws were made by men whom you elected. Ask whether they are reasonable and good laws, upholding justice and the public weal.”

He would have invited comparison of his record in this respect with that of the Long Parliament (which sat for twenty years without an election, and whose members came to think of themselves as rulers for life, accountable to no one) and Cromwell (who eventually dissolved Parliament and ruled as a military dictator, under whose rule the ordinary Englishman had far less liberty than under Charles).

In his struggle with his opponents, Charles considered himself to be contending for two things:

(1) the good of the realm and the liberty and well-being of the people, which he believed would be better served by the monarch ruling according to ancient precedent, maintaining the traditional rights of the people as enshrined in the common law, than by a Parliament that ended up denying that it was either bound by the law or accountable to the people; and

(2) the Church of England, preaching the doctrine of the undivided Church of the first ten centuries, administering sacraments regarded not as mere psychological aids to devotion but as vehicles of the presence and activity of God in his Church, governed by bishops who had been consecrated by bishops who had been consecrated by bishops… back certainly to the second century, and, as many have believed, back to the Twelve Apostles and to the command of Christ himself.

In his Declaration at Newport, in the last year of his life, he said:

“I conceive that Episcopal government is most consonant to the Word of God, and of an apostolical institution, as it appears by the Scripture, to have been practised by the Apostles themselves, and by them committed and derived to particular persons as their substitutes or successors therein and hath ever since to these last times been exercised by Bishops in all the Churches of Christ, and therefore I cannot in conscience consent to abolish the said government.”

In a day when religious toleration was not widespread, King Charles I was noteworthy for his reluctance to engage in religious persecution of any kind, whether against Romanists or Anabaptists.

http://justus.anglican.org/resources/bio/92.html

King Charles I – Anglican Martyr | Anglican History Blog

charleyboy

30 January: Commemoration of Charles I of England, King and Martyr

Source: King Charles I Anglican Martyr | Anglican History Blog

“A devotional cult was established in Charles’ name and he is considered an Anglican martyr, especially by Anglo-Catholics. It is said that if Charles had been willing to abandon the Church and give up the episcopacy he might have saved his throne and his life. Charles would not give to either demand, and as Gladstone said, ‘it was for the Church that Charles shed his blood on the scaffold.’

“Charles was removed as a saint from the calendar in 1859 but his feast day continues to be observed in the Church of England. The Society of King Charles the Martyr continues devotional activities in his memory…

“Charles is commemorated in churches across England and his last word of ‘REMEMBER’ can be found on statues. A hymn written to St. Charles contains this verse:

“For England’s Church, for England’s realm (Once thine in earthly sway), Lest storms our Ark should overwhelm, Saint Charles of England pray!”

Romania’s Prime Minister resigns after disagreement with the royal family | Royal Central

Romania’s Prime Minister Mihai Tudose resigned after losing the support from his own political party. Former Prime Minister Tudose recently decided to expel the royal family from Elisabeta Palace. This resulted in a statement from parliament speaker Liviu Dragnea and leader of the Social Democratic Party where it was announced that Prime Minister Tudose had signed his resignation.

Source: Romania’s Prime Minister resigns after disagreement with the royal family – Royal Central

Support for monarchy seems to be growing in a number of areas of the world, and one of these is certainly Romania!

“Last week, the Romanian royal family was ordered to evacuate the Elizabeth Palace before 5 February on the direct order of then Prime Minister Mihai Tudose. This created huge protests. Former Prime Minister Mihai Tudose, a former communist, lied publically to the press and said that the royal family had been using the castle without paying for it. These allegations were strongly denied in a statement by Crown Princess Margarita. The news was first reported internationally by “The International Monarchist Conference”.

“Parliament speaker Liviu Dragnea had declared himself a royalist and in favour of the Royal House of Romania. The fact that the Prime Minister lied about this and tried to have the royal family thrown out of the palace was condemned strongly by the majority of the parliament and speaker Dragnea. This has resulted in the ongoing political crisis.”

Most interesting!