“Wisdom of the Ages” – Anthony Esolen

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Here is a quick and generally reliable rule to follow. If people have always said it, it is probably true; it is the distilled wisdom of the ages. If people have not always said it, but everybody is saying it now, it is probably a lie; it is the concentrated madness of the moment.

~ Anthony Esolen, noted Dante scholar, professor of literature and Western civilization (currently at Thomas More College), and author of many books, including Out of the Ashes: Rebuilding American Culture and The Politically Incorrect Guide to Western Civilization.

 

On a lighter note, from our RC friends – the beard as a sacramental!

I think it’s important to be a man of virtue and distinction, and I think that in this vein the beard works as an excellent sacramental that sets us apart as men who desire these virtues. A sign of our masculinity in the world. I think a man can pursue these graces and virtues without a beard, but I don’t know why you would.

Source: This Is The Greatest Thing To Happen To Bearded Catholics Since The Franciscans… | uCatholic

While I am not Roman Catholic, as an Anglican I am part of the Church Catholic; and while I know many fine, earnest, and dedicated Christian men who do not sport beards, as a bearded man myself, I cannot fail to doff my hat to this sentiment!

Apparently the view was shared by no less an authority than the great saint and doctor of the Church, St. Augustine of Hippo:

st_augustine_beard_quote1

See also LentenBeards: Praying with the Bearded Saints – and of course, to tend your own beard in an appropriate blessed fashion, Catholic Balm Co.!

BELWEDER DECLARATION: “The Charter of Real Farming and Real Food”

Source: BELWEDER DECLARATION: “The Charter of Real Farming and Real Food”

Poland’s farmers speak up for “real farming and real food”:

Having in mind respect for the beautiful traditions of peasant family farms, which in a unique way contribute towards the preservation of culture and biodiversity of crops in the Polish countryside and the best foods available in Europe;

recognising [sic] the key role of small and medium farms in the protection and preservation of food sovereignty that is essential for the basic supply of food for the Nation;

and believing that the only way that can guarantee optimal health and good condition of natural environment is the promotion of a diet based on local high-quality foods and the preservation of country landscape marked by natural biodiversity,

we demand that the President and the Polish Government:

Immediately start implementing a conscious policy whose aim is the protection and promotion of true qualities of the Polish countryside which serve the Polish Nation, and which are currently being irrevocably devastated by rapid globalisation and development of industrial farming,

[and to] remove the restrictions concerning the possibility to buy a full range of products from local farmers by shops, schools, restaurants and other institutions… 

We urge the President and the Polish Government to protect the unique geographical and historical strength of Poland based on traditional Polish countryside and create/draw a new vision of farming in order to prevent the imminent global catastrophe that threatens life and health of mankind and biodiversity.

Follow the link to read the rest.

Another reason to say,

Bóg błogosławi polską!

(God bless Poland!)

Bóg błogosławi Polsce!

Bóg błogosławi Polsce

In honour of our Eastern European friends, especially the good people of Poland, who are fighting back against the EU, enforced mass immigration, and the “soft” jihad!

Then the Winged Hussars arrived…!”

Charge of the Winged Hussars - Vienna 1683

Bóg błogosławi Polsce!

(God bless Poland!)

Reflections on grounding oneself in the tradition

Those of us who respect, even revere the past, who value tradition, who both yearn for and promote the ways of the past as a helpful and healthful antidote to the psychological and cultural poisons of the present, are nonetheless living in a swirling vortex of those present poisons every day – nearly, every hour of every day. And for those of us who get a lot of our news and commentary online, the ceaseless 24-hour news cycle of factoids, “alternative facts,” pseudo-facts, and a plethora of competing perspectives can be overwhelming.

Even when the information is solid and accurate – which is not so often as one might wish – it is still coming at one at such a frenzied pace, and frequently with such a tinge of hysteria, that this commentator, at least, often feels like he’s on the bridge of a beleaguered starship Enterprise, bouncing Klingon disruptors off his forward shields, and praying those shields don’t collapse! Or to switch metaphors, to be struggling to find solid ground amidst the shifting sand of popular opinion, and even competing claims about the nature of truth and reality.

This is why it is so important to ground oneself in the tradition itself. Historical, intellectual, and philosophical, of course; but also cultural, artistic, and musical, among other components. Continue reading “Reflections on grounding oneself in the tradition”

Reflections on the Southern Agrarians and their lessons for us today

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Eastman Johnson (American painter, 1824-1906): Man With a Scythe – 1868.

I finally had the opportunity to acquire a book I have long wanted to read: “I’ll Take My Stand: the South and the Agrarian Tradition” by “Twelve Southerners,” a collection of essays written specifically for that publication (called by its authors a “symposium”) and published in 1930. Continue reading “Reflections on the Southern Agrarians and their lessons for us today”