Dear Traditional Worshipers: How Do We Find Our Way?

It’s not about sentimentality. It’s not about taste or preference. It’s about meaning.

Source: Dear Traditional Worshipers: How Do We Find Our Way?

“It’s devastating to see what’s happened to worship in the church… The blindness surrounding the issue is astounding. The insistence that the common trends of the day are most fitting for public worship is wrong and short-sighted. It’s [grievous] that most churches now let Christians choose to not learn the historic creeds, or the great tradition of hymns and songs, or the great privilege of praying together and reading Scripture together. The commercialization of our sacred time, well, it’s nothing short of tragic…

“[But] it’s not enough to say ‘we like [traditional worship].’ That doesn’t matter. The worst thing that ‘contemporary worship’ did when it came on the scene was to promote itself as just another worship option, and then get away with labeling the liturgy as a choice, also. When we make the conversation about preference, we don’t get anywhere… It’s not about sentimentality. It’s not about taste or preference. It’s about meaning. So maybe we need to rethink our plan of action…

A lot of wisdom, here, in my opinion.

Man Snaps Photo Of NYC In 1956

A picture has surfaced of the New York City skyline back in 1956, which shows three buildings decorated with window crosses for Easter. Featured in a newspaper article, [the photograph] shows the buildings lit up with huge crosses.

Source: Man Snaps Photo Of NYC In 1956

The article accompanying the picture (warning: extremely add-heavy and slow-loading page) comments,

“Things were a lot different 60 years ago. For one, public displays of Christianity were something that, regardless of your political affiliation, could be appreciated and admired by all. This is not the case anymore…

“Whoever took this photo probably would never have guessed that over 60 years later, this country would have morphed into a society that would erase any display of Christian faith from the public square under the guise of tolerance, multiculturalism, and secularism.

“Even our holidays, which have been a tradition in this country for generations, are under threat. No longer is it appropriate to say ‘Merry Christmas.’ We are supposed to say ‘Happy Holidays’ to be respectful of other spiritual faiths. Of course, this is less about being multicultural and more about being anti-Christian and anti-tradition.

“This picture shows a world that makes progressive-secularists furious. It was a world where free speech actually included freedom for Christians to express their faith, without fear of censorship, mockery, or even lawsuits being leveled against them.”

As Archie Bunker would have said, “those were the days!”

 

“The Friendly Village” china pattern – a family memory, “Made in England”

A thread I was following elsewhere today, on the subject of family china patterns, reminded me of my family’s “everyday” pattern, “The Friendly Village,” by Johnson Brothers:

Friendly Village china pattern - Johnson Brothers

It is an English pattern, thus my decision to post this on The Anglophilic Anglican. The pottery itself is known as “transferware,” but is apparently (hard to find detailed information on the subject!) based on the Johnson Brothers’ process for producing a type of durable vitreous earthenware known as “White Granite,” celebrated for having the look of fine china but being tough and chip resistant like ironstone. Indeed, most people simple refer to it as “Johnson Brothers ironstone.”

Following WW II, the Johnson Brothers gained Royal Warrants from Queen Elizabeth II and the Queen Mother. I seem to recall seeing those on the backstamps of our set; they are missing from this one:

Friend Village "Made in England" backstamp

But I may be misremembering. For more details, please see the excellent, interesting, and photographically well-illustrated essay found here, at Nancy’s Daily Dish.

The Friendly Village first appeared in 1953, and it was probably around that time that Ma and Pa purchased it – Pa, actually, as this was a simpler and economically more robust time, when a family could survive and thrive on a single income: the husband was the “breadwinner,” and the wife not only mother but “homemaker,” as it was called. It is a lovely, rustic, and charming pattern, and I am fortunate enough to have inherited it! Sadly, it is – along with much else – languishing in storage at the moment, until I have a place where I can properly exhibit and utilize it. I miss it, along with many other things that are currently stored!

Here are a few more pictures, gleaned from the internet:

 

The set pictured at the upper-left is very similar to ours – including the oval-shaped serving plate – with the exception that our set has the teacups, as pictured to the right, rather than the larger coffee cups. We also have two oval serving bowls, not pictured, that I was not able to find on the net. Our family set also has the creamer (small pitcher) and, I think, a sugar bowl, although I’m not certain about the last.

The gravy boat, pictured at the bottom, is somewhat unique in that it’s not fastened to its under-plate! As as result, one has to be careful that it does not slide around or even off, depositing the gravy on the table or floor, rather than the food… For some reason, we have two of them; we never, to my recollection, used both at the same time – and despite occasional slippage, never had a significant spill.

At any rate, a fun (if somewhat bittersweet, under the circumstances) romp through family history and eating traditions!

HRH The Prince of Wales – “Recovery of the soul”

HRH Prince Charles - Recovery of the soul

I do not agree with everything Prince Charles has to say, but in this I believe His Royal Highness is 100% correct. When I do agree with him, it usually has to do with architecture, agriculture, or tradition!

Is the “natural habitat” of Catholic Christians (including Anglicans) urban or rural?

Angelus-Jean-François_Millet
The Angelus (1857–59) by Jean-François Millet

I wrote this piece as a reply to a thread in a Facebook group called “Catholic Village Movement: Rebuilding Christendom.” The idea was floated that, Many of us came from cities just 100 years ago. Maybe cities are the Catholic’s natural environment. Ugh. Gross. But also maybe true.” I am not so sure. In fact, I doubt it!

Here is my response – please read “Catholic” or “Catholics” to include all branches of the Church Catholic, including not only those of the Roman observance, but our Eastern Orthodox brethren, and of course, those of us who are Anglicans – slightly cleaned up and elaborated upon from the original:

I have just been an observer of the conversations on this group heretofore, but for what it’s worth (maybe nothing), here’s another perspective on the urban-vs-rural thing. Yes, “pagani” meant, roughly, “country bumpkins.” Actually it meant, literally, “dwellers in the pagus,” with “pagus” meaning – interestingly enough – “village,” but also district, countryside, rural portions of a civitas (http://latinmeaning.com/pagus-latin-to-english-translation/). It had, by the early Christian era, acquired a slightly pejorative cast to it, like “hicks” or “rednecks.”

So the question to ask ourselves is, why did those who clung to their pre-Christian religions (shades of Obama’s infamous “bitterly clinging to God and guns” remark…) become known as “pagani” (“pagans”)? Because a) new teachings took longer – a lot longer – to percolate out to the countryside, in those pre-hi-tech (and, for many, pre-literate) days, and b) because the cities had become inhospitable to them, having been largely converted to the new religion, Christianity. The situation is similar today, although the roles are reversed.

Ask yourself, where is the greatest survival of Christian (not only, but including, Catholic) belief and practice today? Hint: it’s not in the big, densely-populated coastal urban enclaves! It’s in the “flyover states,” and in more rural sections of the rest of the states. And for many of the same reasons that the “pagus” remained “pagan” long after Christianity had begun to gain traction in the more urban areas: cities are not, and never have been, amenable for those who want to maintain traditions. Continue reading “Is the “natural habitat” of Catholic Christians (including Anglicans) urban or rural?”

Alle Stadlstern Sieger 2006-2010 – 30 Jahre Musikantenstadl (HQ) – YouTube

With so much drama and frustration circulating around the situation in Europe these days, let’s take a break and enjoy this medley of traditional European music!

And let’s not forget the beautiful Marilena:

And “Europeans have no culture.” Uh-huh… riiiiiiiight.