HMS Queen Elizabeth deals with Hurricane Florence on way to F-35 trials | Business Insider

HMS Queen Elizabeth

HMS Queen Elizabeth was delayed by waves and winds caused by Hurricane Florence on its way to Norfolk, Virginia.

Source: HMS Queen Elizabeth deals with Hurricane Florence on way to F-35 trials – Business Insider

Maryland – my home state – represents!

“The British Royal Navy’s £3.5 billion ($4.5 billion) aircraft carrier had left the UK for America on August 18, to start September training with F-35B jets based at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland, the Royal Navy wrote on its official website.

Video clip of HMS Queen Elizabeth leaving Portsmouth:

“The stop in Norfolk, the second after a pit-stop in Florida on September 5, is the aircraft carrier’s last before it goes to Maryland for F35B jet training.

The journey was not all smooth sailing, thanks to Hurricane Florence:

“[The Royal Navy] said HMS Queen Elizabeth passed to the south of the Hurricane’s eye but still met four meter swells, five meter waves, and winds of 46 mph.”

An earlier article (“Britain’s newest and most powerful aircraft carrier is headed to America to train with F-35s for the first time“) had noted that

“Britain’s newest and most powerful aircraft carrier, HMS Queen Elizabeth, is on its way to America to train with F-35 jets for the first time,” and that “The deployment is significant because it will mark the first fighter jet landing on a British aircraft carrier in eight years.”

Video of F-35 vs the earlier, British-made, carrier-based fighter, the AV-8B Harrier II:

“The first landing on the HMS Queen Elizabeth will happen at the end of September, according to the Portsmouth News. The jets are expected to perform 500 take-offs and landings over an 11-week period, the Royal Navy said…”

“HMS Queen Elizabeth is the third largest aircraft carrier in the world at 280 meters long and a weight of 65,000 tonnes. In total, there will be about 1,500 people on board, the Portsmouth News reported.”

“It is expected to be on active duty in 2021.”

Additional information, from the “Save the Royal Navy” website:

“Carrier heaven” – US Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia – the world’s largest naval base, and home to six of the US Navy’s ten super-carriers
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Europe’s Christian revolution – and why the UK isn’t part of it | The Conservative Woman

Secular globalism’s chickens are coming home to roost.

Source: Europe’s Christian revolution – and why the UK isn’t part of it | The Conservative Woman

“Secular globalism’s chickens are coming home to roost. Globalism’s anti-cultural, anti-traditional thrust threatens a sense of place, identity and security. Confronted by this, people instinctively tend to resist by re-asserting their traditional identity. Secular globalism’s anti-traditional dynamic has produced a counter dynamic.

“A major plank of European identity is Christianity. As people feel vulnerable and experience anxiety due to the changes surrounding them over which they feel they have no control, it is natural for them to assert their customs, traditions, ethnicity, language and above all their spiritual roots.

“There is one major exception to this European renewal of Christianity: the UK. There are signs of recovery such as an increase in numbers training for ordination, but these are little more than straws in the wind.

“Why? Culture and faith are inseparable, they interact and influence each other.

“In the UK the mainstream denominations have completely bought into the progressivist globalist vision. Instead of leading the cultural conversation, they are frantically scrambling to catch up… Aping the world, they declare themselves irrelevant, and decline in numbers and influence.”

To say that this is a saddening – and also, anger-inducing – situation for The Anglophilic Anglican is to run the risk of understatement. There is, however, a glimmer of hope, albeit a faint one:

“The main areas of church growth in the UK are in churches insisting on teaching and living traditional Christianity. This is no surprise. Research on general social groups has shown that those with a consistent, unified message and clear boundaries which define who are inside the group and who are outside are actually attractive to outsiders.”

But as the article concludes, “Whether the mainstream denominations are prepared to take the risk of teaching a consistent, unified, and biblical message is another matter.” At least there are traditional Anglican jurisdictions that are doing just that. But the complete abdication of so-called “mainstream” Christian churches to the secular culture remains disheartening and frustrating.

A day in the life of an English “Bobby” (policeman) in 1959 – ah, the good ol’ days!

One year ago today, British & Commonwealth Forces posted this lovely video on their Facebook page, with the following commentary:

The British Policeman (1959) – a Public Information Film produced for the Colonial Office.

This portrait of a British Policeman was commissioned by the Colonial Office to promote Britain’s Police Service to the colonies and Commonwealth states.

Released in 1959, this film upholds one of the Central Office of Information’s (COI) founding principles and the reason for its commitment to producing Public Information Films. In December 1945 the incumbent Prime Minister Clement Attlee stated it was important “a true and adequate picture of British institutions and the British way of life should be presented overseas” through such films.

Following a ‘typical’ day in the life of Police Constable Jack Edwards, the film shows his ‘typical’ duties over an eight-hour shift. The film portrayal of PC Edwards as a guardian of law and order in 1950s Britain, understandably looks dated, when compared to today’s modern Police Service.

This film made available courtesy the UK National Archives.

How times have changed – and not particularly for the better, either!

Nota Bene: Why are British policemen known as “Bobbies”? Why, ’tis an affectionate and respectful nod to Sir Robert Peel, their founder:

“The concept of modern policing has its roots in pre-Victorian England, when the British home minister, Sir Robert Peel (1778-1850), oversaw the creation of London’s first organized police force. Before Peel’s 1829 reforms, public order had been maintained by a mix of night watchmen, local constables and red-coat-wearing army soldiers, who were deployed as much to quell political troubles as to deal with local crime.

“In creating London’s Metropolitan Police (headquartered on a short street called Scotland Yard), Peel sought to create a professionalized law enforcement corps that was as accountable to everyday citizens as to the ruling classes. When Peel’s opponents complained that the creation of the new police force would restrict personal liberties, Peel responded, ‘I want to teach people that liberty does not consist in having your house robbed by organized gangs of thieves, and in leaving the principal streets of London in the nightly possession of drunken women and vagabonds.’

“Instead of the resented red coats, Peel’s patrolmen wore black jackets and tall wool hats with shiny badges. They went out armed only with a short club and a whistle for summoning backup, walking regular beats and working to gain the trust of the local citizens. Robert Peel’s system was a success, and by the mid-19th century large American cities had created similar police forces. In London, the policemen were so identified with the politician who created them that they were referred to as ‘Peelers’ or—more memorably—’Bobbies,’ after the popular nickname for Robert.”

The Glories of the West: Scots Highlanders! Royal Regiment of Scotland

After [duty as] the Queen’s honour guard outside Balmoral Castle & Estate this week, the guard from Balaklava Company, the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, led by The Highlanders – 4 SCOTS Pipes & Drums, both of The Royal Regiment of Scotland, return to barracks through Ballater in Royal Deeside.

God Save the Queen!

A rousing rendition of the British National Anthem, “God Save the Queen”!

Lyrics follow:

God save our gracious Queen!
Long live our noble Queen!
God save the Queen!
Send her victorious,
Happy and glorious,
Long to reign over us:
God save the Queen!

O Lord our God, arise!
Scatter her enemies,
And make them fall.
Confound their politics,
Frustrate their knavish tricks;
On Thee our hopes we fix:
God save us all!

Thy choicest gifts in store,
On her be pleased to pour:
Long may she reign!
May she defend our laws,
And ever give us cause,
To sing with heart and voice:
God save the Queen!

Oh, Tommy Robinson #FreeTommy | Official Music Video – YouTube

“Oh, Tommy Tommy! Tommy, Tommy, Tommy, Tommy Robinson!”

There can be no question that the arrest and sudden incarceration – all taking place within about five hours – of activist and online journalist Tommy Robinson has struck a nerve with the British people. Whether this will prove the spark that sets the fires of open revolt against the present government remains to be seen, but Robinson has clearly become the icon around which a lot of British anger and resentment has coalesced.

And unlike the so-called “Resistance” against President Trump, here in the U.S., the Brits have a good deal of genuine authoritarianism, even downright tyranny, to revolt against. The sources of resentment are multiple:

  • BREXIT – in which a clear (albeit narrow) majority of the largest percentage of the British electorate to turn out for an election or referendum in decades voted to Leave the European Union, only to see the government stall, waffle, and second-guess until it’s now questionable whether a BREXIT will actually happen, or whether if it does, it will be hedged with so many conditions as to be in practice little better than Remaining.
  • Continued mass immigration, with pressure to submit to still more – most of it from places such as the Middle East, sub-Saharan Africa, and Southwest Asia (primarily Pakistan) which are both majority Muslim and culturally and ethnically alien to Britons, and which have led to a vastly increased crime rate in the UK as well as considerable cultural dislocation, leading to fears – entirely justifiable, in my view – that Britain is in danger of having its history, heritage, and present culture swept away and replaced by something foreign.
  • On the subject of crime, the dismaying unwillingness of the British police and judiciary to constructively address the problem of “grooming gangs” (or as British journalist Katie Hopkins accurately labels them, “rape squads”) made up of so-called “Asians” (Southwest Asians; again, Muslim Pakistanis) who seduce, enslave, rape, and abuse ethnic British girls with, to date, almost complete impunity, due to the fear by the authorities of being labeled “racist.” It is this that Tommy Robinson was protesting, when he was arrested.
  • And increasingly, thought-policing: Brits have been warned by the police to “be careful” what they post online and in social media, and that they could be arrested for posting anything that might be deemed a “hate crime” or incitement thereto. Given what happened to Tommy Robinson, who was live-streaming outside a court sentencing (a rarity!) members of one grooming gang, this has understandably had a chilling effect on public discourse regarding the above issues!

Draconian anti-gun laws have already stripped Britons of their ability to defend themselves, and now (as described above) their right to express themselves is coming under increasing attack, as well. As I have commented before, in more than one forum, George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four was not incorrect, it was just a few decades premature!

Nonetheless, as I say, the arrest and imprisonment of Tommy Robinson has galvanized a significant segment of the British public. It has certainly and understandably enraged those who have been frustrated and angry for some time over the issues listed above, but I have a strong sense that it has also awakened many others who, up to this point, had been reluctant to either admit to the problem, or to take a stand.

People are coming – however belatedly – to the realization that they, too, could be arrested and imprisoned simply for speaking their minds, expressing their opinions, in the public square: either literally, as Tommy Robinson did, or online. So it is no surprise to me that this has become a flashpoint in the UK. And maybe, God willing, a turning-point as well. I hope so! Time will tell.

The Medical and Legal Establishment Has Got It Wrong On Alfie Evans | Musings of an Old Curmudgeon

Image result for alfie evans

Of all the worldwide comment on the Alfie Evans case, the core truth was best encapsulated by a headline in the Wall Street Journal: “Alfie Evans and the State. A medical debate that’s gone global is not about the money. It’s about power.”

Source: Musings of an Old Curmudgeon: The Medical and Legal Establishment Has Got It Wrong On Alfie Evans

Most readers are probably at least somewhat familiar with the case of Alfie Evans, a 23-month-old boy from Liverpool with a still-undiagnosed neurodegenerative disorder (a fact which is itself concerning), who died in Alder Hey Hospital in Britain after a British court ordered life support removed (technically, they ruled that doctors could order the removal of life support, which they did).

This, despite his parents’ valiant fight to take him to Italy for further treatment, which resulted in Alfie being granted Italian citizenship, the Pope chartering a state-of-the-art air ambulance to fly him there, and the Italian government and even military standing by to serve in a support role.

Despite international outcry and support for Alfie and his parents, the hospital not only took him off the respirator – after which he continue to surprise everyone by living four more days – but for even denied him sustenance and hydration, and went so far as to station a police cordon outside the hospital so that he could not be removed.

The argument was that airlifting him to Italy – where he would, as is generally accepted, have had no more hope of recovery than in Britain – would not be “in the child’s best interest.” Apparently starving and dehydrating him was.

I was a relative latecomer to this saga, but after learning about it, the incident has touched me deeply. I found the linked response to be particularly on-target:

“[At] every stage of this power struggle, the motive invoked was Alfie’s ‘best interests.’

“In the event, Alfie’s best interests turned out to consist of removing his ventilation, depriving him of nutrition for more than 24 hours, giving him minimal hydration and refusing, with the support of the courts, to release him from the hospital where this regime was being imposed on him. Although judicial permission had been given, in principle though not in practice, for his parents to take him home, this was deferred due to fears they might abscond with him to Rome and secure him humane treatment…

“Nobody expected a miracle cure at the Bambino Gesù (though its world-class clinicians might at least have succeeded in diagnosing Alfie’s illness, in the interests of medical research). What was expected was that Alfie could have ended his days among people who did not automatically regard his best interests as synonymous with death. His palliative care would have been of a high order and, as a moral principle, he would not have been starved or dehydrated to death – the point at which gently allowing a hopeless case to slip away crosses the red line to become euthanasia…

“And what about his parents? In that environment they could have spent invaluable time with their son, become reconciled to the inevitability of his death, in the consoling knowledge that every human endeavour had been exhausted in the effort to save him. That experience would have brought them – though the over-used term may jar – ‘closure.’

“Why was that not allowed to happen? The air ambulance ordered by the Pope was state-of-the-art, the medical personnel highly qualified, even the Italian military were involved and the danger of harm to Alfie in transit minimal; and, if he had died naturally, it would have been no worse than suffocating at Alder Hey. At least his parents would have done their best for him.

“But family and parental rights are being marginalized in Britain. It was spelled out from the judicial bench that parental rights took second place to the child’s best interests, a subjective term that turned out to be a euphemism for killing him… Here, however, we had two loving parents, in full agreement, trying to take their child abroad with every medical facility both in transit and at their destination, but prevented by the state.

“That is the grim reality: Alfie Evans [was] a prisoner of the State.”

It was and is a tragedy. Not Great Britain’s finest hour!