Don’t Mock Mike Pence For Protecting His Marriage, Commend Him

Liberals were horrified to learn that Mike Pence doesn’t dine alone with women who aren’t his wife and doesn’t drink if she’s not around. They shouldn’t be.

Source: Don’t Mock Mike Pence For Protecting His Marriage, Commend Him

Vice President Mike Pence sets clear boundaries, to protect the integrity of his marriage, and to avoid even the appearance of impropriety. For this, he is mocked and insulted by people on the Left. So, pussy hats and slut-walks are acceptable, but treating one’s marriage as the sacred thing it is, is not? All rightie, then… I wish I could honestly say I was surprised.

“Anyway, is Mike Pence a monster for not dining privately with women who are not his wife? What about not boozing it up at parties unless his wife is around? Not only is he not a monster, he sounds like he’s a smart man who understands that infidelity is something that threatens every marriage and must be guarded against…

“Infidelity destroys intimacy, happiness, and marriages themselves. But it happens because of the strong temptation that exists every day for most healthy people. When marriages end, the associated costs are financial, emotional, and physical. Divorce tends to be hard on men, women, and children. It harms economic and health outcomes for children, and decreases women’s standard of living over the course of their lifetimes. Guarding against it is smart…

“If divorce rates weren’t sky-high and if infidelity weren’t a problem faced by millions of couples, mocking Pence for the means by which he keeps his marriage intact might make more sense. Heck, if the human condition weren’t such that we all find it difficult to do the right thing, the mockery also might make sense.

“As it is, Pence’s smart tactics for avoiding the kind of marital failure that could destroy him, his wife, their family, and the lives of those around them is to be commended and celebrated.”

Emotional Connection: How to Get the Sex Life of Your Dreams

What is the one thing we want and need most in relationships?

If you said sex … you’re wrong.

Source: Emotional Connection: How to Get the Sex Life of Your Dreams

While the headline speaks of sex – it’s no secret that “sex sells” – this is really about more than just sexuality; it’s about the importance of emotional connection, intimacy, and commitment:

Recent studies have shown that people who have the highest sexual satisfaction and the most sex are married couples. This statistic defeats the commonly held notion that intimacy for couples must decrease with time, and that novel sexual encounters are the most satisfying.

In the context of a committed relationship, it is not novelty that determines satisfaction, but emotional connection.

The deeper you are able to connect with your partner emotionally, the more dynamic your sexual experience will be. The greater your emotional connection is with your partner, the more in tune you will be with their physical and sexual needs as well.  Emotional connection requires the most sensitivity of any of our needs, so it is the most important connection to practice.

Since it’s difficult to develop a significant emotional connection in the absence of a sustained and committed relationship, commitment is key to a healthy and satisfying sex life – as it is in pretty much every other aspect of a worthwhile relationship. So where did we get this crazy idea that promiscuity is a desirable trait?

In any case, some of us intuited this truth about the critical importance of emotional connection a long, long time ago… but it’s still kind of nice to see some additional research backing it up! Now I just need to find the right woman… nothing could be simpler, right? *wry grin*

After all, my standards aren’t high (irony alert!) – just someone with whom I can connect on all levels: physical, emotional, intellectual, and spiritual… One day, God willing!

Moral Minority by Patrick J. Deneen | Articles | First Things

Published within months of each other, three books share the belief that traditional Christians are a moral minority.

Source: Moral Minority by Patrick J. Deneen | Articles | First Things

Typical excellence from First Things, though this a sobering article, more than an encouraging one. Yet it is important to know where we stand, to be fully aware of the scope of the task ahead of us. And the task is large! Complex, as well. As this article notes,

“Politics will not save us. What is first of all necessary is to rebuild a culture in disarray. Compared with recovering the basic requirements of virtuous civilization — healthy communities, flourishing family life, sound education, a deep reservoir of cultural memory and practice, and formative religious faith — remaking the Supreme Court is a cinch. Philosophers who have described culture as the first requirement of a healthy civilization, from Plato to Burke to Tocqueville, have generally believed that the most one can consciously strive to achieve is preservation of a healthy culture, should one be fortunate enough to possess one. Once a culture is corrupted from within, however, they saw little hope of reversing its decay.”

Deneen further notes that despite some successes for political conservatives, over the last 30 to 40 years, the culture has changed, and not in a traditional direction: “For nearly thirty years, conservatives have triumphed politically amid a catastrophic breakdown of social and cultural norms, especially those that foster an ethic of self-sacrifice, commonweal, and practices that inculcate duty, discipline, respect, civility, and obedience.” In other words, the cultural corruption, the decay, is already deep-seated.

Continue reading “Moral Minority by Patrick J. Deneen | Articles | First Things”

The Anglophilic Anglican is creating a defense of Western Christendom | Patreon

Introducing The Anglophilic Anglican’s Patreon account!

St George Flag with Lion

Source: The Anglophilic Anglican is creating a defense of Western Christendom | Patreon

We live in a challenging time in history, one in which traditional Western and Christian values are under attack from a multitude of sources, including but not limited to militant Islam, militant atheism, and – perhaps even more concerning – widespread apathy and denial.

The Anglophilic Anglican is a blog and social-media project based in the United States but pro-British and pro-European in orientation, which seeks to promote and defend traditional Western and Christian values through original commentary and sharing of relevant content on my blog and various social media platforms [currently working on a YouTube channel, and other venues may be developed as time, money, and energy allows]. Your patronage enables me to devote less time and effort to mere subsistence, and more time and effort to this campaign, this task, this sacred duty!

If you find this blog and its content to be interesting, inspiring, enjoyable, or in any other way helpful, please consider supporting The Anglophilic Anglican (both the blog and its author) via Patreon.

Any amount is greatly appreciated: as indicated above, the less time and effort I have to spend pursuing subsistence income, the more time and effort I have available to defend the ideals and values of Western and Christian civilization against those who are attacking them, and to inspire others to take up the fight.

As well, of course, as to share interesting and relevant content and commentary on a wide range of topics closely or loosely related to things English / British, Anglican, or traditional (whether European or American). This blog has always had a fairly wide-ranging scope, and that will not cease to be the case, despite my decision to focus on culture and heritage defense.

I leave you with two thoughts – neither original, but both of them cogent and apposite: “We must stand together or we shall surely fall separately,” and “Good things are easily destroyed, but not easily created.” Let’s make sure we’re on the creative side of history!

I thank you very much in advance for your kind and generous patronage.

Yours in service to our common heritage and ideals,

The Anglophilic Anglican

Prayer is not wishful nonsense. It helps us to shut up and think | Giles Fraser – Loose canon | Opinion | The Guardian

Under that flag of convenience called free speech, people tear up their decency in the search for “likes”. Oh, how cheaply we trade the things that matter most. Have social media and the stamping foot of the 24-hour news cycle killed off the quiet dignity of grief, both religious and non-religious?

Source: Prayer is not wishful nonsense. It helps us to shut up and think | Giles Fraser Loose canon | Opinion | The Guardian

Some thoughtful reflections from Giles Fraser, a parish priest in south London, who blogs under the name of “The Loose Canon”:

Prayer is not a way of telling God the things he already knows. Nor is it some act of collective lobbying, whereby the almighty is encouraged to see the world from your perspective if you screw up your face really hard and wish it so. Forget Christopher Robin at the end of the bed. Prayer is mostly about emptying your head waiting for stuff to become clear. There is no secret formula. And holding people in your prayers is not wishful thinking. It’s a sort of compassionate concentration, where someone is deliberately thought about in the presence of the widest imaginable perspective – like giving them a mental cradling.

But above all, prayer is often just a jolly good excuse to shut up for a while and think.

He seems, from what I can determine, to be toward the left end of the political spectrum. But he is square on about this!

And of course, this is leaving out of the equation the question of whether or not prayer really is efficacious. As Christians, we believe that God knows our needs before we ask them, and often responds before we can ask. But he still wants to hear us ask – that demonstrates that we know precisely what we want and need, and hopefully have reflected on why.

Does praying increase the chance that God will respond? Maybe, maybe not. I’m inclined to doubt it, for the reasons I’ve already delineated. But I’m not going to stop praying, for that reason! It’s been said that prayer is not really for God, but for us, and I agree with that. It gives us the chance to thoughtfully ponder – and to lay before that most awesome and transcendent divine reality, God Himself – our concerns, and the concerns of others: to hold them lovingly in our hearts, and minds. That is no bad thing, regardless of any practical effects it may or may not have.

Prayer should not, it is true, distract us from taking what practical steps we are able to take, to effect the changes we want to see. As St. James the Apostle wrote,

If a brother or sister is ill-clad and in lack of daily food, and one of you says to them, ‘Go in peace, be warmed and filled,’ without giving them the things needed for the body, what does it profit? So faith by itself, if it has no works, is dead. (James 2:15-16)

Yet that does not invalidate prayer, as an act of mercy, of kindness, of compassion – and of faith in a God who is also merciful, kind, and compassionate. Sometimes prayer can, and often should, accompany action. Sometimes a situation is so overwhelming, or so out of our control, that all we can do is pray. And if that’s all we can do, then we should certainly do all that we can do.