Old-fashioned toys, not video games, best for kids, pediatricians say | WRCBtv.com – Chattanooga

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Don’t be fooled by all those “educational” electronics in stores. What’s best for your kids, pediatricians say, are old-fashioned toys that require you to actually interact with them.

Source: Old-fashioned toys, not video games, best for kids, pediatrician – WRCBtv.com | Chattanooga News, Weather & Sports

“Play is important for child development, but children learn best from adults. They get language skills, learn about how the world works, and get feedback that can reinforce learning and positive behavior, the American Academy of Pediatrics says in new guidelines for people buying toys for kids.”

The most amazing part of this is that, apparently, it comes as a surprise to some people!

The AAP cautions that

“a little common sense goes a long way, the AAP says in its reminders. Kids need to use their imaginations, they need to move both their hands and their bodies and they need to express creativity. Simple toys such as blocks, crayons and card games can fill these needs better than the flashiest video game”

And goes on to add,

“The truth is most tablets, computer games, and apps advertised as ‘educational’ aren’t. Most ‘educational’ apps target memory skills, such as ABCs and shapes,” the guidelines read.

“These skills are only one part of school readiness. The skills young children really need to learn for success in school (and life) include impulse control, managing emotions, and creative, flexible thinking. These are best learned through unstructured and social play with family and friends.”

So-called educational games and apps on digital media may, in fact, delay social development [emphasis added], especially for young children, because [such technology] interferes with their learning about real-life facial expressions and gestures.”

When it comes to screen time, less is more:

“Parents also need to remember to limit kids’ use of video and computer games, the AAP says. ‘Total screen time, including television and computer use, should be less than one hour per day for children 2 years or older and avoided for those younger than 2 years of age,’ the guidelines point out.”

That was the rule in my growing-up years, when “screens” meant television. I may have chafed at it, at the time, but (with the perspective and, hopefully, maturity that age brings) I recognize the wisdom of the restriction, now.

Caveat emptor! “Some products may be marketed in a way that makes parents feel their kids are missing out if they don’t get them. Don’t fall for it, the AAP says.” Oh, really? Do ya think? Gee, I didn’t know that corporations ever marketed their products in ways that over-state their benefits and minimize their risks… *wry smile*

In any case:

Read the whole article – there’s a lot more information, and it’s all interesting, especially to those who care about the social and physical, as well as intellectual and psycho-emotional, development of children.

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March for Life: Amazing Turnout and Resolve to Stop Abortion | TFP Student Action

Source: March for Life: Amazing Turnout and Resolve to Stop Abortion | TFP Student Action

I occupy what I suppose some might consider a “moderate” position on the abortion issue, in that I believe abortion should be safe (to protect the life and health of women, in the event that it is medically necessary – and yes, that does occur, at times), legal (to ensure that it is safe), and rare (because the taking of a human life should always be a last resort, never ever a first option – and abortion should never be considered a form of birth control). I am resolutely opposed to the reprehensible calls by those on the extreme left for abortion “on demand, without apology” – and expecting the government (and thus, the taxpayers) to fund it.

On the subject of “my body, my choice” – frequently touted by those advocating the pro-abortion position – this is obviously false on its face: a fetus may depend on the woman’s body for its survival, prior to a certain stage of gestation, but from the moment of conception it is clearly a distinct individual, having its own individual genetic makeup (combining genes from both parents), and its own distinct, individual development.

“My body”? As one recent photo of a pro-life poster (which I wish I could find; I apparently failed to save it) put the matter, “since when do we think a woman has four legs, four arms, two heads, two hearts, and two different sets of genes?” It is not (just) a woman’s body; and therefore her sovereignty over it is a shared sovereignty: shared with the father of the child, and with the unborn child itself, who from the moment of conception is a child not only of his or her human parents, but a child of God.

Therefore it is with encouragement and optimism that I greet reports that the March for Life in Washington, DC, which occurred on Friday (18 January 2019) was reportedly the largest to date, with a turnout that may have been as high as 300,000 – many, if not most, of these being young people. Those on the Left who think that time is on their side, that all they have to do is wait for all the “old fogeys” to die off, may be unpleasantly surprised by the conservatism of the rising generation!

These young people have seen the failures and consequences of the “Me Generation,” and of the failed political and social experiments of the Left since the 1960s, and in many cases, want none of it. Indeed, it seems that we are seeing the beginning of a serious and growing backlash… thanks be to God.

The Vocation of Motherhood… and Fatherhood, too.

The text that goes with this picture is a bit hard to make out, so here it is:

“Remember motherhood was God’s plan for women, not men. We all forget that motherhood is the norm and a career is abnormal. Some are compromising and urging our good high school girls to colleges and careers. Mother Teresa’s words are so enduring to our times when she said that, ‘God calls us to be faithful, not successful.’ Anyone who wishes to debate Mother’s words should pray to God for grace and insight to understand these words of wisdom. These words are especially true for the mothers of our day and time. Many mothers are so wrapped up in the ‘media success’ of these times that they see nothing wrong with going out to work. Very few mothers ‘have’ to work outside the home and it is to the detriment of family life.”

—Rosie Gil

As I wrote in response to this at the time, I agree – but I also think we sometimes forget that it was God’s plan for fathers to be at or near home most of the time, too, unless they were on a journey for the benefit of the family, or fighting to protect it.

Whether farmers – as were the majority of people until quite recently in human history – tradesmen, or merchants (the latter two of which usually had their shops or offices downstairs, with the family residence upstairs), most men spent most of their time in relatively close proximity to, and often / usually working together with, the rest of their family, right up until the Industrial Revolution.

I am not trying to detract in any way from the vital role and vocation of motherhood, or the desirability of mothers being able to devote themselves full-time to that vocation, if at all possible, and to the closely allied one of homemaking – literally, creating a home that is worthy of a family to live in.

I am simply pointing out that I believe God’s original plan was for families to be organic, integrated units of relationship, with all members working together for the common good, and supporting one another in daily living – not mom and kids at home, and dad working somewhere else, a long commute away, and only seeing them in the evening and on weekends.

The 1950s, as idyllic a time as it was in some (though not all) respects, was neither the norm nor the ideal, either – nor, certainly, were the “dark, satanic mills” of the Industrial Revolution. We have fallen a long way from the original plan, imho, in many respects!

Greek to Me, by Mary Norris | The New Yorker

Mary Norris, also known as the Comma Queen, on the pleasures of a different alphabet.

Source: Greek to Me, by Mary Norris | The New Yorker

While I must confess that I really do not have an urge to study Greek, either ancient or modern (if I were going to take up the study of ancient languages again, they would be Latin and Old English) I thought this was an interesting piece.

Combining a first-person memoir with a defense of the study of classical languages in our current era, it is fair apologia which deserves to be considered by, as author Mary Norris puts it, “anyone who doubts the value of studying a dead language.”

It’s also worth a share in light of my earlier post on Greece’s Nea Dexia party, as it points out one of the ways in which the Greek “hill” (the Acropolis, in Failos Kranidiotis’ engaging metaphor) has influenced, and continues to influence, Western culture.

(Nota Bene: It should be noted that The New Yorker can still publish worthwhile articles – so long as one stays away from its left-leaning political ones.)

QOTD: “We want a Europe based on its three hills…”

“We want a Europe based on its three hills: Acropolis, Capitolium and Golgotha. Hellenism, Rome and Christianity. An alliance of sovereign states against foreign enemies, terrorism and illegal emigration, with low taxes, rebirth of national production and motives to families to make more children.”

— Failos Kranidiotis, of the Greek nationalist and populist party Nea Dexia (the New Right)

Source: New patriotic Greek party wants higher birth rates and to protect Europe from Islamic colonisation – Interview

Globalism (which has both a sociopolitical and a corporate element) and cultural Marxism are strong, and firmly entrenched in the political, social, and academic elites of the West. The “long march through the institutions” has been, in many ways, all too dismayingly successful. But now, at long last, there is a real push-back.

People are beginning to see that, in the memorable image of Hans Christian Andersen’s story, “the Emperor has no clothes.” Or perhaps one should say, if the globalist / cultural Marxist “emperor” does have clothes, they include the jackboots of totalitarianism!

In any case, nationalist and populist sentiment is growing, and political parties with a nationalist and populist orientation are either springing up (like Nea Dexia) or finding new inspiration and expression (like the French Rassemblement National) with increasing vigour. Popular movements such as the Gilets Jaunes (Yellow Vests) are another manifestation of the same trend.

It’s as if the antibodies in the blood of the West have finally detected and begun to react against the disease that has been afflicting it for so long! Those of us who have been watching with both sorrow and anger the agony of the West’s long self-immolation find this a refreshing and hopeful development, and one inspiring cautious optimism.

And I find this motif of the “three hills” of Europe to be a powerful image. Granted, one of them (Golgotha) is not actually in Europe! But anyone who doubts the impact of Christianity on the development of Europe, and its right to be include as one of the core pillars of what was, after all, known as “Christian Europe,” or “Western Christendom,” is simply not paying attention.

It has long been understood – and only quite recently come into question, by those who seek to disassemble the West entirely – that Classical Greece, Ancient Rome, and Christianity are the three pillars or wellsprings of traditional Western culture. The philosophy, art, and literature of Greece, the legal, administrative, and military ability of Rome (and the political insights of both), and the spiritual, moral, and social teachings of Christianity have, between them, defined the West for millennia.

Remove any of the three, and we are left with something less that EVROPA.

Without wishing in any way to minimize the important (indeed, vital) contributions of my own Celtic and Germanic forebears, Europe – and thus, the West! – stands or falls on the Three Hills. It is on them that we must form our shield-walls, and from them that we shall begin the Reconquest of our culture and heritage from those who seek to destroy it.

‘The gilets jaunes are unstoppable’ | sp!ked

Christophe Guilluy on the cultural divide driving the yellow vests.

Source: ‘The gilets jaunes are unstoppable’

“The gilets jaunes (yellow vest) movement has rattled the French establishment. For several months, crowds ranging from tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands have been taking to the streets every weekend across the whole of France. They have had enormous success, extracting major concessions from the government. They continue to march…

“The middle-class reaction to the yellow vests has been telling. Immediately, the protesters were denounced as xenophobes, anti-Semites and homophobes. The elites present themselves as anti-fascist and anti-racist but this is merely a way of defending their class interests. It is the only argument they can muster to defend their status, but it is not working anymore.

“Now the elites are afraid. For the first time, there is a movement which cannot be controlled through the normal political mechanisms…”

Again: Vive la France!

The Son Rises in the West: France & the Resurrection of the Faith | The Imaginative Conservative

Notre Dame

“Christianity has died many times and risen again; for it has a God who knew the way out of the grave.”

— G.K.Chesterton, The Everlasting Man

Source: The Son Rises in the West: France & the Resurrection of the Faith ~ The Imaginative Conservative

Vive la France!

Christus regnat et imperat!

The gates of Hell shall not prevail against Christ’s Body, the Church; certainly the gates of secularism shall not. And France was pretty far gone: if she is reviving, there is hope for the West, generally!

Read, and be encouraged…!