Empty the stadiums.

Boycott the NFL

I don’t usually waste time even thinking about “sportsball,” much less writing about it. But the National Football League has jumped the proverbial shark, with this “take a knee” during the National Anthem B.S. – and even more, by refusing to admit they have taken a wrong turn, but instead doubling down on their stupidity.

The idea that the NFL would dare to complain about “lack of respect,” when they are disrespecting our flag and everything it stands for – including the sacrifice of all those who have fallen defending that flag, and “the Republic for which it stands,” over the centuries – just fills me with absolute and complete disdain for those sorry excuses for human beings. “Respect”? They deserve none. They’re being paid millions to play a frickin’ game, and they’re acting like spoiled children! Despicable.

And yes, I agree that they have a right to “take a knee” if that’s what they want to do. Absolutely. And the rest of us have the right to think that they’re despicable, reprehensible children with no respect or appreciation for the incredible opportunities they and everyone else in this country possess simply by virtue of being born here. As one friend pointed out, the very fact that they have the right to behave in such a pitiful fashion without being jailed for it is precisely why they should not do it!

Cretins.

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Chesterton and Belloc on the nature of democracy

Chesterton and Belloc - nature of democracy

Source: The Wrath of Gnon – Twitter feed

The author of the “Wrath of Gnon” blog quotes G.K. Chesterton and Hilaire Belloc on the nature of democracy. Some interesting concepts, and worth considering, in my opinion! Reminds me of hagiographer James Kiefer’s reflection on the English King Charles I, who for his defense of the historic episcopate and the Book of Common Prayer is accounted by many Anglicans a martyr:

“On the scaffold, he said (I quote from memory and may not have the exact words):

“No man in England is a better friend to liberty than myself, But I must tell you plainly that the liberty of subjects consists not in having a hand in the government, but in having that government, and those laws, whereby their lives and their goods may be most their own.”

“That is to say, one may reasonably ask of a government that it establish justice in the land; so that judges do not take bribes, so that innocent men are not convicted of crimes, while the guilty are convicted and punished, so that honest men need fear neither robbers nor the sheriff. One may further ask that taxes be not excessive, and that punishments be not disproportionate to the crime. Charles would have said, ‘Do not ask whether the laws were made by men whom you elected. Ask whether they are reasonable and good laws, upholding justice and the public weal.’

“He would have invited comparison of his record in this respect with that of the Long Parliament (which sat for twenty years without an election, and whose members came to think of themselves as rulers for life, accountable to no one) and Cromwell (who eventually dissolved Parliament and ruled as a military dictator, under whose rule the ordinary Englishman had far less liberty than under Charles).”

There is much truth in the above. Both the ancients and our own Founders knew that democracy is inherently unstable, since it depends upon popular sentiment that can be easily swayed by a demagogue, and the closer it is to “pure” democracy, the thinner the line dividing it from demagoguery and dictatorship.

While I am not sure I would be entirely happy under the sort of absolute monarchy Charles I favoured, I do tend to agree both with King Charles I, as quoted above, and with the “Wrath of Gnon” author – who writes, referring to Chesterton and Belloc’s comments on democracy,

“Give me a Council of Elders to govern me, and a King to protect me.”

More on the Autumn Equinox

Cornucopia – horn of plenty

Yesterday (September 21st) may have been the traditional date for the Autumn Equinox – that I was born on the Equinox is an excuse I often cite for any eccentricities in my character! – but today is this year’s astronomical Equinox: that point in the Autumn of the year when the day and night are of equal length (“equinox” literally means “equal night”). So I offer this discussion of the day by a friend:

22nd September

The Celtic festival of Mabon – The autumnal equinox

The autumnal equinox is the time when the day and night are of equal length. This was a solar festival of great importance to the Celts who used the sky as both clock and calendar, as it was seen as a turning point in the year and as such, a time to get prepared for the colder months to follow.

Traditionally, this would have been the second harvest festival, celebrated with a feast and offerings to give thanks for the fruits of the earth and also acknowledge the harsh times ahead. The “Harvest Moon” is associated with the autumnal equinox, as being the closest full moon to it. It occurs when the moon rises approximately 30 minutes later from one night to the next. Thus, there is no long period of darkness between sunset and moonrise for several days following the actual date of the full moon.

The Celts did not seem to have a specific name for this time of year, but it has become widely known recently as Mabon, named after the character from the mabinogian, Mabon ap Modron.

Mabon Ap Modron (son of Modron) is stolen from his mother Modron when he is only 3 days old. While Modron grieves for her loss, Mabon, the bright child of promise, is hidden or locked away (depending on the version ) in a castle for many years. His rescue becomes a quest for one of Arthur’s knights. Cei, Arthur’s adopted brother, and Gwrhyr, the translator of animal languages. In their journey they must seek out many ancient animals, each older and wiser than the one before.

They visit a Blackbird, a Stag, an Owl and an Eagle, until they are finally led to the salmon of Llyn Llyw, the oldest animal of them all. The enormous salmon carries them downstream to Mabon’s prison in Gloucester, where they hear him through the walls, singing a lamentation for his fate. The rest of Arthur’s men launch an assault on the front of the prison, while Cei and Bedwyr sneak in the back and rescue Mabon.

In the restored Druidic tradition of the Order of Bards, Ovates, and Druids, and other British Druidic Orders, this day is known as “Alban Elfed“:

The name for the festival of the Autumn Equinox in Druidry is Alban Elfed, which means ‘The Light of the Water’. The Wheel turns and the time of balance returns. Alban Elfed marks the balance of day and night before the darkness overtakes the light. It is also the time of the second harvest, usually of the fruit which has stayed on the trees and plants that have ripened under the summer sun. It is this final harvest which can take the central theme of the Alban Elfed ceremony – thanking the Earth, in her full abundance as Mother and Giver, for the great harvest, as Autumn begins.

Whether you call it Alban Elfed, Mabon, the Autumn Equinox, or the first day of Fall, I hope you have an enjoyable celebration of this day when light and dark are in balance!

Autumn Equinox Rituals September 2017 Mabon Celebration

Find the way to honor this ancient holiday that works best for you.

Source: Autumn Equinox Rituals September 2017 Mabon Celebration

Although yesterday, September 21st – which also happens to be my birthday! – was the traditional date of the Autumn Equinox, today, the 22nd, is the “official,” astronomical date for this year (it varies between the 20th and, occasionally, as late as the 23rd).

With the coming of the Fall Equinox, Summer is at an end; and for those with eyes to see it, the signs of the changing seasons are everywhere apparent in the natural world. Trees are changing colours, leaves spin or drift lazily down, autumn wildflowers – chickory, asters, goldenrod – replace those of summer, and birds gather in foraging flocks or roost along telephone wires, gathering energy for the migration… or, if year-’round residents, for the long season of cold and reduced food sources.

This is always a bittersweet time of year for me: having been born into this season, I love it, and wait for it with anticipation and even longing for most of the rest of the year. The sights, the sounds, the smells, even the tastes of Autumn speak to my soul. But I would be less than honest if I did not admit to a tinge of regret as the sun slips earthward earlier each evening, and rises later and more reluctantly each morning.

Besides, it is a transition, and transitions are always poignant, for me. So it is not without mixed feelings that I greet the Autumn Equinox! With that in mind, I share this essay: a lovely selection of suggestions for both celebrating this season, and dealing with the sometimes conflicting emotions it can evoke within us.

“Nowadays, the fall equinox reminds us that, not only is the weather going to change, but so will our personal lives and plans. Home and family usually take center stage during the colder months, which can mean moving our priorities around. Consider this day a brief respite before you find yourself dragging out the heavy coats and planning holiday meals.”

Indeed! Read and, hopefully, enjoy – perhaps, even find some comfort.

The Right Needs Joy | Jacobite

If you really wish to “red-pill the normies,” you must show them how to love.

Source: The Right Needs Joy – Jacobite

“Right-leaning young people are awash with ironic memes that call out the contemporary plagues on Western society with humor. If nothing else, you have to admit that today’s young right has fun…

“But mockery and irony are far cries from true, abiding joy. Joy is an essential aspect of human flourishing, and a posture of mockery and irony is diametrically opposed to the experience of joy…

“Young conservatives and reactionaries, much as they flail their hands at the death of Western civilization and the loss of wisdom, do very little in the way of actually preserving the beauty and truth underlying this great tradition.

“If joy is truly a result of love, man must be very careful to develop the right affections in his breast. Right now many on the right seem hellbent on cultivating affection for dank memes rather than for truth, goodness, and beauty.”

This is one of the reasons I endeavor (with mixed success, I am sure) to keep the current incarnation of this blog from descending into nothing but darkness and despair – and believe me, it’s easy to fall into the sin of despair, if you are truly paying attention to current events these days.

I post political and meta-political content, in much greater quantity than formerly, because I think people need to be informed. But I also try to post lighter-hearted pieces – historical, seasonal, and of course, monarchical (!) – and try, again with mixed success, to keep the two aspects of this blog balanced.

To the extent that I fail to do so, I apologize! In times of trouble, we need the light of history, hope, and humour more than ever.

Happy 80th Birthday to Middle Earth!

hobbit-cover-01

As if it weren’t enough that both the traditional date of the Autumnal Equinox, and my own birthday, fall upon this date, today is also the 80th anniversary of the publication of J.R.R. Tolkien‘s classic The Hobbit, back on 21 September, 1937!

The above picture is the cover art from the original Allen & Unwin (U.K.) edition; the one below is the cover of the paperback Ballantine (U.S.) edition which was my personal introduction, in 1977, to the world of Middle Earth:

1976Hobbitballantine

My father, who was then hospitalized following a heart attack, had first The Hobbit, and then all three volumes of The Lord of the Rings, brought to him by a friend to read; as he finished one, I proceeded to devour it in turn. They have remained a major influence on me – literarily, linguistically, and philosophically – ever since!

So I salute the great Professor Tolkien and his epic achievement. May he rest forever in the Undying Lands, beyond the Sundering Seas!

Would the world be a better place if Germany won World War 1? (Part 1) – YouTube

An interesting take on “alternate history”!

Many people either instinctively realize or have discovered through study that the defeat of the Central Powers (Germany, Austria-Hungary, the Ottoman Empire, and Bulgaria) by the Allied Powers (Britain, France, Russia, and eventually the United States) – and especially the draconic surrender terms insisted upon by the French – led directly to the rise of Hitler and the Nazis in Germany, and everything that followed.

(World War One, of course, was a completely unnecessary and horribly destructive “brother’s war” which accomplished absolutely nothing positive and much to the contrary, and the negative effects of this debacle continue to ripple through Europe and the world on many levels to this day. But I digress…)

But what if the Central Powers had won? Not just attained a negotiated peace (which would almost certainly have happened, were it not for a violent Communist insurgency within the Fatherland itself which forced Germany to sue for peace – it strains both language and credulity to claim that Germany “lost” the war when its troops were inside enemy territory on all fronts), but actually won outright?

Unlikely, perhaps, but not inconceivable – especially if the United States had stayed out, as we would have been well-advised to do. Allied propaganda aside, would the world have been a worse place… or a better one? This videoPart 2, and Part 3 suggest that the latter scenario is the more likely. Despite my pride in my paternal grandfather, who fought for the U.S. in WW I, I am inclined to agree. These three videos (the second and third are embedded below) do a very good job, in my opinion, of explaining why.