The Notre Dame fire: what was saved and what was lost | Aleteia

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Amidst the fire’s wreckage, much of the treasures of Notre Dame were saved.

Source: The Notre Dame fire: what was saved and what was lost | Aleteia

While the damage to le Cathédrale de Notre Dame de Paris from Monday’s fire was very severe, not only the structure of the Cathedral, but many of the priceless, irreplaceable artifacts and relics contained within were preserved. In fact, it is remarkable, gratifying, and – I would maintain – miraculous, how much has been saved!

The roof and the spire are gone, of course (and the current plans to update the spire – rather than restoring it – are very concerning, to those of us who care about tradition, heritage, and aesthetics); but the treasures that remain include:

  • The High Altar and its Cross:

“However, amidst the chaos, the cross suspended above the altar remains intact, “painful and luminous at the same time,” in the words of Fr. Grosjean, a priest of the diocese of Versailles.”

  • Many statues, including three of the Blessed Virgin Mary
  • The largest and most famous of the Cathedral’s four organs, dating back to the 13th century
  • Incredibly, the Rose Windows and much of the Cathedral’s stained glass, including all or nearly all of its medieval stained glass
  • Furthermore, all of the major Christian relics appear to have been saved:

“The tunic of St. Louis and the Crown of Thorns were saved, said Bishop Patrick Chauvet, rector of the cathedral, on Monday evening. Two other relics kept at Notre Dame, a piece of the Cross and a nail from the Passion, also escaped the flames, thanks to the work of the firefighters.”

  • Even the rooster-shaped bronze reliquary that topped the Cathedral’s spiral survived both the inferno that consumed the spire, and the long fall that followed, and

“was found intact on Tuesday—damaged, but whole, according to Bishop Patrick Chauvet. The three relics that were miraculously saved within it are a piece of the Holy Crown of Thorns and relics of St. Denis and St. Genevieve, patrons of Paris.”

Follow the link for more details. But if this – both the fire itself, and what has by God’s grace survived it – is not an allegory for the times we are living in, and an inspiration to Christians concerned by the decline of Western Christendom, I do not know what is!

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Only by returning to the Faith can we truly rebuild Notre Dame | Catholic Herald

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Image by Getty.

What should make us tremble is that to truly rebuild Notre Dame will require becoming the kind of people who built her in the first place.

Source: Only by returning to the Faith can we truly rebuild Notre Dame | Catholic Herald

Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris was built out of stone and wood and glass without electricity or computers. It was not built by committee, or consultants or according to state regulations. It was built by a culture superior to our own. And we know it..

“As the spire cracked and buckled, millions of us felt civilization trembling…

“We tremble because we know that the world has been drawing down a Christian inheritance for centuries, drawing down the cultural wealth of the Faith into rampant prodigal decadence.

“The proximate cause of the fire is not yet known, but the symbolic cause is hundreds of years in the making…”

 

Photos show center of Notre Dame cathedral miraculously intact | New York Post

Smoke rises around the altar in front of the cross inside the Notre Dame Cathedral as a fire continues to burn in Paris

Source: Photos show center of Notre Dame cathedral miraculously intact | New York Post

Deo gratias!!! Thanks be to God! The interior damage to Notre Dame seems to have been much less severe than feared. The Altar and Great Cross are intact, along with much else (including woodwork!); even the very candles seem to have survived un-melted! You can say what you want, I call that a miracle. Again, thanks be to God!

“Photos from inside Notre Dame show the central part of the historic Gothic cathedral still intact. Rows of wooden pews and much of the nave appears to have been saved, according to the images. ‘Only a small part of the vault collapsed. Interior seems relatively untouched. Hallelujah!’ wrote @CathedralNotre

“Still, a massive hole can be seen in the 850-year-old cathedral’s roof. The pictures also show smoke emanating from the chancel, the area around the altar. Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo told Le Monde there was ‘a big hole in the roof.'” However, “‘The altar and its cross are preserved. It’s not as bad as I feared,’ she told Le Monde.”

That’s not to say there isn’t severe damage; there is. The spire and most of the roof is gone; there are several honking great holes in the vaulted ceiling. But the medieval stone-masons who built it, 800 years ago, did their work well! It holds, it stands; it appears to be, in fact, significantly intact. God grant it remains that way!

I go to bed with a much lighter and very grateful heart!

Massive fire breaks out in Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris | Fox News

Flames rise during a fire at the landmark Notre-Dame Cathedral in central Paris on April 15, 2019 afternoon.

The famed Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris was engulfed in flames on Monday leading to the collapse of the structure’s main spire.

Source: Massive fire breaks out in Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris | Fox News

Horrific. I am – uncharacteristically – all but speechless. And heartbroken.

200 years in the making, 800 years old, Notre Dame – the Cathedral of Our Lady – is the heart and soul of Catholic France… arguably, of European Christendom. Even in secular terms, so much priceless, irreplaceable art and architecture embodied in that structure. And the prayers of so many Christian faithful, for so many centuries, have winged heaven-ward from those walls and towers.

Lord, have mercy. Christ, have mercy. Lord, have mercy.

Rev. Thomas Harbold’s review of “Defending Boyhood: How Building Forts, Reading Stories, Playing Ball, and Praying to God Can Change the World” | Goodreads

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When Anthony Esolen – among the most able defenders of Western civilization, and Western Christendom in particular, active today – chooses to discourse on a subject, the wise person reads or listens attentively…

Source: Rev. Thomas Harbold’s review of Defending Boyhood: How Building Forts, Reading Stories, Playing Ball, and Praying to God Can Change the World | Goodreads

When Anthony Esolen – among the most able defenders of Western civilization, and Western Christendom in particular, active today – chooses to discourse on a subject, the wise person reads or listens attentively, nor does he or she lack reward for having done so. Esolen writes with exuberance, penetrating insight, and equally-penetrating wit, and Defending Boyhood is no exception to that rule. I was alternately delighted, intrigued, inspired, and moved.

As a former boy myself, I resonate strongly with the former boy that shines through Esolen’s mature, erudite, and engaging writing, and frequently found myself nodding in emphatic agreement. His treatment of boyhood, and boys – what they value, how they view life, and the goals and ideals that are common to boys across time, geography, and culture – has the ring of truth, and stands as a much-needed antidote to the venomous miasma that much of modern culture seems bent on creating around such formerly straightforward concepts as manhood, masculinity, and boyhood…

Read my whole review here.

 

Boston Globe op-ed suggests restaurant waitstaff ‘tamper’ with Republicans’ food | TheBlaze

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The Boston Globe is under fire after publishing an opinion piece suggesting that restaurant waitstaff tamper with Republicans’ – particularly President Trump staffers’ – food.

Source: Boston Globe op-ed suggests restaurant waitstaff ‘tamper’ with Republicans’ food – TheBlaze

Bastard.

I’m sorry, not sorry, for the language. It is, however, both accurate and warranted.

I also apologize for posting a second political post in one day, during a time when I said I’d do my best to avoid such posts, but the opinion piece to which the Blaze article refers is completely over the top! In fact, I’m so angry I can hardly think straight, much less write coherently.

First, read the linked article, if you haven’t already, for the details. Then here are my thoughts:

First off, this individual (who I will not dignify by naming) is absolute and complete scum of the earth. The fact that he would write such a piece for publication is more than ample evidence of that. And the Boston Globe, despite its efforts to weasel out of the situation, is complicit, for its lack of “editorial oversight” in the first place. What, in God’s name, where they thinking, to allow that to appear in print?

Quite aside from the ethical, health-related, and just plain disgusting-ness elements of this reprehensible screed, how could anyone, on any side of the political aisle, possibly think that tampering with food as an act of political terrorism is in any way acceptable, or in any way beneficial to their or anyone’s cause – or, for that matter, to our culture, society, and even economy?

While everyone knows that there are sometimes questionable practices in restaurants, and sometimes questionable food makes it out to the table, the entire restaurant culture of this (or any) country is founded on the assumption that such incidents are rare, and usually limited to “greasy spoon” types of establishments.

If people are going to have to start thinking – even when they go out to a nice dinner at a nice restaurant – “Well, gee, what if my waiter overhears a comment I make to a table companion, or doesn’t like my choice of hat, and decides I’m of a political persuasion he or she doesn’t like, so s/he decides to spit (or worse) on my food, as a result?” What’s that going to do to people’s willingness to go out to dinner?

The level and variety of stupidities embodied in the described opinion piece are so many and so epic that it just beggars description. AND – this is the crowning irony – this is from someone who considers conservatives to be haters. Let that sink in for a minute. This guy doesn’t like the President, so he considers that it’s perfectly okay to p___ in the food of those who do, and in fact stated that people who do so would “be serving America” (though he later, and completely unconvincingly, walked that back).

But that’s okay. Being on the other side of the political aisle is not.

Trump Derangement Syndrome is real. And I am coming increasingly – if reluctantly – to agree with the assertion that today’s “liberalism” (which is a far cry from classical liberalism) is a flat-out, full-blown mental illness.

As I said:

Bastard.

Sick, disgusting, brain-damaged bastard.

But I still wouldn’t p____ in his food, because I have standards.

Even for scum like him.

Glories of the West – the Pre-Rafaelites: “Gather Ye Rosebuds While Ye May” (Waterhouse)

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This lovely painting fortuitously came across my newsfeed this morning, posted by a friend of mine, Paul Edward Lafferty Smallwood, who posted it and commented,

“‘Gather Ye Rosebuds While Ye May,’ 1909, John William Waterhouse, English. John William Waterhouse (1849 – 1917) was an English painter known for working first in the Academic style and for then embracing the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood’s style and subject matter. His artworks were known for their depictions of women from both ancient Greek mythology and Arthurian legend.”

The reference is to a poem by Robert Herrick (1591-1674), entitled “To the Virgins, to Make Much of TIme”:

Gather ye rosebuds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles today
Tomorrow will be dying.

The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun,
The higher he’s a-getting,
The sooner will his race be run,
And nearer he’s to setting.

That age is best which is the first,
When youth and blood are warmer;
But being spent, the worse, and worst
Times still succeed the former.

Then be not coy, but use your time,
And while ye may, go marry;
For having lost but once your prime,
You may forever tarry.